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Shed / workshop cladding

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ewanjp

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Hi all,

In the (very) slow process of building a new shed / garden workshop at my new house. It's 3.6 x 3m on screw foundations. At the moment the frame of the thing is up (build for 2x4s and 2x5s) and covered in thick black plastic to keep the weather off. Recently had a baby so it's a very drawn out project, but I was hoping sheet material prices would come down - they've not.... I figured I would clad the sides of the thing over xmas as I have a couple of weeks off. Trying to decide what is best:

a) 11mm OSB with 150mm featheredge from the local wood yard on top of that (roughly 800 quid)
b) just 150mm featheredge without the OSB (roughly 400 quid)

It's primary use will be as a shed, but my wife will also probably use it for some garden stuff as well (potting plants and such). I built a workshop at my old house, which I used 19mm ship lap but I can't find that locally apart from at wickes which is normally very poor quality. It'll be used to store some reasonably high value items (bikes + a nice ride on mower), so i'm inclined to go OSB + featheredge so the security of OSB is reassuring... might be massively over building it though!

Obviously 400 pounds is quite a difference, but given the amount this has cost me already in materials and particularly ground screws, I want it to last a long time.

Thoughts? a or b?
 

Jameshow

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Give henshaw timber Baildon, a call they do good quality cladding. 22mm - v groove, log lap or shiplap.

National delivery too.

Cheers James
 

clogs

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
look for some used insulated steel sheeting...
no maintainence, secure as everything else, easy to screw up, can be trimmed with ordiary tools,
the whole shed will be fin in one day.....
I did the roof on an 11mLx7.5mD shed roof in a morning, just me and a mate....plus it was 5m tall.....
I won't used wood anymore as the cost is about the same and all the extra work keeping it looking ghood...
 

ewanjp

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I would recommend covering the outside with breathable membrane, add 2x1 battens and then add the featheredge. You can insulate and clad the inside if you ever see the need. It will make a nice draft proof fully water tight shed.
Do you mean breathable membrane over OSB? or just breatherable membrane over the stud work?

Will check out henshaw timber.

Not keen on the look of steel (and more importantly, my wife certainly wouldn't be!)
 

Ollie78

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The breathable membrane should be on the outside of the OSB then put tile battons to add an air gap and attach the feather edge or shiplap to the battens.
You could do it without osb but the strength the sheeting gives the structure is well worth it.


Ollie
 

RobinBHM

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Hi all,

In the (very) slow process of building a new shed / garden workshop at my new house. It's 3.6 x 3m on screw foundations. At the moment the frame of the thing is up (build for 2x4s and 2x5s) and covered in thick black plastic to keep the weather off. Recently had a baby so it's a very drawn out project, but I was hoping sheet material prices would come down - they've not.... I figured I would clad the sides of the thing over xmas as I have a couple of weeks off. Trying to decide what is best:

a) 11mm OSB with 150mm featheredge from the local wood yard on top of that (roughly 800 quid)
b) just 150mm featheredge without the OSB (roughly 400 quid)

It's primary use will be as a shed, but my wife will also probably use it for some garden stuff as well (potting plants and such). I built a workshop at my old house, which I used 19mm ship lap but I can't find that locally apart from at wickes which is normally very poor quality. It'll be used to store some reasonably high value items (bikes + a nice ride on mower), so i'm inclined to go OSB + featheredge so the security of OSB is reassuring... might be massively over building it though!

Obviously 400 pounds is quite a difference, but given the amount this has cost me already in materials and particularly ground screws, I want it to last a long time.

Thoughts? a or b?
as mentioned above, use breathable membrane on the outside, then 38 x 25 battens laid flat for an air gap. This makes a massive difference to the longevity of the structure and its weather tightness.

any rain that gets through the cladding, will run out the bottom, the inside will stay lovely and dry.

Is the structure against a fence - if so, clad the garden facing sides with timber cladding and clad the fence facing sides with metal box profile or cement board.
 

RichardG

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Do you mean breathable membrane over OSB? or just breatherable membrane over the stud work?
Breathable membrane over the stud work, you can put the OSB on the inside, will make the shed more rigid but not necessary on such a small structure. Just make sure the frame is fitted with noggins.
 

mikej460

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The breathable membrane should be on the outside of the OSB then put tile battons to add an air gap and attach the feather edge or shiplap to the battens.
You could do it without osb but the strength the sheeting gives the structure is well worth it.


Ollie
Or typically house wrap around the outside, batten then feather edge. Insulation, vapour barrier and OSB3 on the inside (then you could if you wish delay the inside until you've saved enough pocket money).
 

Rufus

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I've just built a new 6x3 workshop and did studwork, OSB, membrane and then featheredge on battens. It's more expensive (especially given the price of OSB o_O ) but in the long run, the end result is draft free, feels drier and structurally seems more solid. Worth the extra investment if you can afford it.
 

ewanjp

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Sounds like OSB is the strongest solution. Guess i'll need to suck up the cost - no point in cutting corners.

Noted on battons, weatherproof membrane, etc. This was in the plan so good to hear confirmation.

Thanks all.
 

Sheptonphil

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Sounds like OSB is the strongest solution. Guess i'll need to suck up the cost - no point in cutting corners.

Noted on battons, weatherproof membrane, etc. This was in the plan so good to hear confirmation.

Thanks all.
Strongest, yes, but I’d put the OSB on the inside. Membrane the frame, batten and clad. Insulation inside, vapour barrier, OSB inside. OSB is all but a vapo barrier anyway due to its high glue content.
 

JBD007

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If it's just going to be a shed I'd put breathable membrane on the outside of the studs/framework then nail on treated shiplap/ loglap. No need for osb on the walls.
 
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