Quantcast

Shed Building

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
I'm designing a shed for my allotment. In the plan I have used 2x4's for the framework. The shed is roughly 2m x 1.6m

Do you think using 2x4's is a bit overkill for a store shed (no windows or internal structure)?
 

SketchUp Guru

Established Member
Joined
12 Apr 2005
Messages
3,152
Reaction score
0
Location
Rochester, MN USA
That's a pretty tiny little shed. I think 2x4s would eat up a lot of internal space. 2x3s would likely suffice. What are you going to sheath it with?

Suppose you used a 4x4 at each corner and a 2x3 or 2x2 midway between (maybe 2 of them on the long sides. Sheath with OSB. Screw it on so as to form a solid skin. I think you'd be in good shape.

What sort of roof do you have planned?
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
Thanks Dave, reading your post made me realise how overkill it is:

Sketchup file: http://www.wizer.co.uk/pics/shed.skp

The idea with this is just to make it cheap. How it looks is irrelevant. But it does need to be sturdy and dry. I was going to cover the whole lot with OSB and then maybe even felt the sides as well as the roof.
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
I would use 38x63 CLS from somewhere like B&Q it's about £1.60 for a 2.4m length and is usually nice and straight.

Jason
 

Mcluma

Established Member
Joined
2 Feb 2005
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
0
Location
Pyrford - Woking
I always use 2*3 there is plenty of strength in them, on the corners you have to double up anyway, and also at doors and windows

secondly it is nice wenn you put insolation in between, with 2*4 the insolation alsways sags

but that is my opinion

McLuma
 

SketchUp Guru

Established Member
Joined
12 Apr 2005
Messages
3,152
Reaction score
0
Location
Rochester, MN USA
I think you could get away with this:

The one on the right, that is. Note no sole plates on the end walls. Lay down the floor before you put up the walls and toe nail the end wall studs into the rim joist through the flooring plywood. There'll be nothing to step over at the doorway, as well. You could make the door a bit taller. I copied your door and just lowered the header above it.

Leave the floor and roof as you drew them. The floor could be 2x4s roof could be 2x3s.
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks guys

Dave, any chance i could have a look at your sketchup file?
 

devonwoody

Established Member
Joined
11 Apr 2004
Messages
13,456
Reaction score
3
Location
Paignton Devon
mailee":3x73489t said:
Built myself this one last year, a bit overkill for what you want though. :wink:
I am rather concerned over your construction, it doesn't seem to have a rear structure?????????????

Oh I see its a reflection :)
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
cheers mailee, think I could get quite a few spades in there!
 

Adam

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
3,768
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
How about building it up off the floor so it doesn't rot?



And some blurb from their website...."The building had to be rot free and allow good ventilation - we employed the Walter Segal principle and have raised the building on stilts to ensure an even air flow around the building, should rot occur all is needed is to replace the feet themselves. This system is now quite popular in our products and we are presently building a scout hut on National Trust property using this principle. As well as the obvious benefit of reducing the likely hood of rot is the fact that the ground is not disturbed unduly still allowing good drainage. "

Adam
 
Top