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sxlalan

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OK, I have finally decided to peer over the edge of the slippery slope and splurge on a Veritas LA Jack. As my first decent hand tool, I guess that I will need to sort out a reasonable way of sharpening the thing. Having read though the forums, I have decided on a diamond stone similar to these, probably the 8" Fine/Coarse DuoSharp #140965. For final polishing I was thinking about one of these, probably the 8000 grit. Does this combination seem reasonable? If so, is there a UK supplier for these stones?

Cheers

Alan
 

MikeW

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Hi Alan,

The DMT is a decent way to go. Personally I do not think they last long enough for their cost. That said and in answer to your question, jumping from the fine DMT to an 8000 may be too big a jump.

If you are thinking about the Shaptons, you may want to consider getting the 1000 and the 2000 in place of the DMT. The 1000 for a coarse stone will last longer than the DMT and do a very nice job. The cost of both is slightly more than the DMT combo, though. The lowest grit stone I have and use is the 2000 Shapton, then I go to my King 4000 and finish with the 8000 Shapton.

Should I need to correct an edge tool I use the Tormek, so I haven't needed a really coarse stone in some time. When I did, I used SS and an 800 grit stone.

In any case, you will also need to flatten the Shaptons (or any other stone). I can only recommend the Lapping plate they sell as well. For the powders used in flattening, though the Shapton powders last a long time (only use a very little at a time), people have been using an inexpensive alternative, the abrasives used for polishing rocks. A 1 pound quantity is, well, cheap.

If the cost is climbing too much, you would do well getting the DMT, and a 4000 King and an 8000 King. The DMT and Kings are available from Lee Valley, if not locally. The Shaptons are only available in Europe via Shapton directly, I think.

I have had a 4000 King stone for a few years and it is a fine stone and will last several more years. They are a very good stone for relatively little money.

The Shaptons, though, cut very fast and mine will most likely outlive even the my Kings.

Sorry for giving more advice than you asked for.

Mike
 

Alf

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A coarse/fine DMT and a fine oilstone (probably not that dissimilar to the 8000 waterstone) has done okay for me. But then diamonds are a girl's best friend. :wink: The only real hassle you might have with the jump is preparing blade backs (or is that just me?) but the Veritas irons are usually not a problem in that respect anyway. Dunno of a UK supplier of Shaptons, but as Mike says, the King ones - from Axminster f'rinstance - are fine. DC uses 'em, if that helps. :D When I bougt my Duo I found D&M Tools was about the best deal when p&p (shipping, Mike) was taken into account, but Machine Mart apparently had the lowest price overall if you have one near you. But I haven't look recently. Tilgear had an offer on the Eze-lap ones until the end of this month IIRC, but I have no experience of them. Oh, and the Trend double-sided one has had good reviews.

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

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I'll claim ignorance about shipping costs to the UK...and old age when the next time rolls around and I forget. But could be why I said ... if not available locally.

The Eze Lap are what are called mono-crystaline stones and do not last as long. But as they have nothing on their surface ('cept the diamonds, of course), for smaller tools (chisels below 12mm, carving tools, etc.) I think they're best. They are considerable less expensive (here anyway).

Alan, one thing I forgot to mention is that if you are new to the sharpening on stones thing, consider a honing guide, too. If you are currently sharpening chisels by hand and are getting along fine, skip it for now.
 

Alf

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MikeW":c369ai8g said:
I'll claim ignorance about shipping costs to the UK...and old age when the next time rolls around and I forget. But could be why I said ... if not available locally.
Oh no, I wasn't having a go, just not sure how "p&p" translates to 'Murrican, so I was making a Jeff-a-like aside for the benefit of our overseas readers. Postage and packing can make quite a difference even within the UK if you go to certain suppliers. Like Machine Mart, f'rinstance... :roll:

MikeW":c369ai8g said:
The Eze Lap.... are considerable less expensive (here anyway).
Here too. It's always put me off them to be honest...

Cheers, Alf
 

sxlalan

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Thanks for the detailed info guys. I'm beginning to realise that every question I ask in this woodworking lark seems to have 1000 different answers/considerations :roll: :lol:

Alf, are these the Axminster stones that you refer to? Any idea on what the grits are that the coarse/medium/fine relate to?

Thanks a lot

Alan
 

Alf

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sxlalan":2tducf68 said:
Alf, are these the Axminster stones that you refer to?
Not especially. I believe all Axminster's stones are "King" brand.

sxlalan":2tducf68 said:
Any idea on what the grits are that the coarse/medium/fine relate to?
If the picture's anything to go by, and it may not be, I assume 250/1000 and 1000/6000 grit like the individual combi stones they sell. But who knows?

I'll stop now before Mike dies laughing at the idea of me giving advice about waterstones. :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

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Alf":ujuqog7a said:
MikeW":ujuqog7a said:
...
MikeW":ujuqog7a said:
The Eze Lap.... are considerable less expensive (here anyway).
Here too. It's always put me off them to be honest...
Cheers, Alf
They do work well for small edge tools. Really nice for small plow irons, chisels and carving tools. I think the one I have is a 600 grit. Fast work on restoring small tool edges from those dang weird tools that keep finding a way into the shop.

And besides, can one really have to many tools for, well, tools?
 

AndyC

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Hi alan!

Looks like you're about to take the step i just did. I've bought an extra coarse/ fine 8" duosharp (from diytools.co.uk, was cheapest i could find). I think the extra coarse is a much better option than the course, it's faster cutting and the step up to fine is just right. I think if you bought a coarse you'd just spend a lot longer achieving the same result, and wish you'd bought the other one! IMHO.

I then followed the advice of david charlesworth and have got the king 1200 and spoilt myself getting the king 8000, both from axminster. I've found these to be a great combination, although i may in future get a 4000 to go between the two, but not in any hurry as they work fine.

You may want to get the 150grit waterstone flattening stone that axminster do aswell, its only 7 pounds, but beware that it probably wont be flat when it arrives, but easy enough to flatten on wet n dry.

As a bit of a hint, I don't think it's made clear just how grimey and sludgey (is that a word?) and dry you need to let the stone get to get a good mirror finish. I just found this out in a bit of a marathon sharpening session!

Hope this helps you out!
 

sxlalan

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Thanks all. One final thought, will I need to flatten the plane itself and if so, what do I use for that?

Cheers

Alan
 
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sxlalan":3ia1kra6 said:
OK, I have finally decided to peer over the edge of the slippery slope and splurge on a Veritas LA Jack. As my first decent hand tool, I guess that I will need to sort out a reasonable way of sharpening the thing. Having read though the forums, I have decided on a diamond stone similar to these, probably the 8" Fine/Coarse DuoSharp #140965. For final polishing I was thinking about one of these, probably the 8000 grit. Does this combination seem reasonable? If so, is there a UK supplier for these stones?

Cheers

Alan
Almost exactly what I use. I go from the duo to a 6000 grit waterstone most times when i re-sharpen blades. Works excedingly well too.
 

MikeW

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sxlalan":12dtmrbe said:
Thanks all. One final thought, will I need to flatten the plane itself and if so, what do I use for that?
Cheers
Alan
Hi Alan,

To "test" the flatness of a vintage plane, I put squiggles of marker down the sole, especially a line directly at the front of the mouth and after laying some 220 grit sand paper on my saw table, slide the plane back and forth a couple times. I then look to see if the marker is coming off evenly.

If not, I use a few grits of sand paper. I start at 100, go to 150 and on to 220. If I want and I have it, I'll do 320 as well.

I attach the paper via clamps and small strips of wood to hold the sides of the paper flat on my saw table or jointer table. It takes less than 10 minutes to do a fairly bad off plane. Do make sure to hold the plane firmly.

I do not even bother to check a new plane. If a new plane is cutting "odd" then I'll check it. This has happened once, but it was obvious. Otherwise a new plane is just fine out of the box.

Mike
 

sxlalan

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Thanks again guys. I've now got a Duosharp on order and will get a King 6000 to go with it for now and see how I go.

Cheers

Alan
 
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