Sharpening Moulding Cutters

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JohnK

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Good morning. Just joined and this is my first post.
Some time ago I bought a Record 405 multi plan, in mint condition with a full set of cutters. I have used it extensively for rebates, grooves etc and more recently for cutting a variety of mouldings. Sharpening the straight edge cutters is no problem, just a case of reproducing the factory ground 35 deg., but the moulding cutters are more difficult. I have seen methods ranging from sandpaper around wooden dowels, round files etc. My intuitive preference would be for slip stones but I wondered whether any members had other views.
 

JohnK

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Good morning. Just joined and this is my first post.
Some time ago I bought a Record 405 multi plan, in mint condition with a full set of cutters. I have used it extensively for rebates, grooves etc and more recently for cutting a variety of mouldings. Sharpening the straight edge cutters is no problem, just a case of reproducing the factory ground 35 deg., but the moulding cutters are more difficult. I have seen methods ranging from sandpaper around wooden dowels, round files etc. My intuitive preference would be for slip stones but I wondered whether any members had other views.
Slip stones and saw files are my go to tools.

There is a very good video on sharpening profile cutters by Larry Williams on the Lie Nielsen website.
Adam
Many thanks, will certainly have a look.
 

Adam W.

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It's well worth the streaming charge to access his extensive knowledge, and he knows more about profile moulding cutters for hand tools than just about anyone else.
 

niall Y

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Hi There,
Am I missing something here? If we're talking about euro type cutters, then they are sharpened by rubbing their backs on a diamond-stone or similar. There is no need to touch the profile. In fact its best if you don't...............
Edit. Just clocked You're talking about a multiplane - not a spindle. DUUUR.....
 
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Droogs

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I created a length of the moulding in MDF when I first got mine and then soaked in some oil and covered it with rouge. As I us mine and feel it needs a touch up I take the iron and run it backwards on the MDF for a few strokes and then give the back a quick swipe on some flat rouged MDF to clean of any bur and crack on.
 

JohnK

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Excellent idea, not something I would have thought of. I have plenty of mdf and some rouge so will definitely give it a try. Thanks again
 

Limey Lurker

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Hi There,
Am I missing something here? If we're talking about euro type cutters, then they are sharpened by rubbing their backs on a diamond-stone or similar. There is no need to touch the profile. In fact its best if you don't...............
Edit. Just clocked You're talking about a multiplane - not a spindle. DUUUR.....


I think that you're correct to suggest following Euro-type cutter practice. Trying to hone or grind the shaped bevel will ruin the cutter. The idea of cutting a a dummy hone and coating it with abrasive, means the very soon the cutter will have no relief; it will be like honing a 45degree bevel on a blade for a 45degree bedding-angle plane.
 

JohnK

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Thanks for this. I ended up using a medium/fine Arkansas slip followed by a few strokes on the mdf profile/rouge combination to finish. Gave excellent result, so I think this will be the way to go.
 

Droogs

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I think that you're correct to suggest following Euro-type cutter practice. Trying to hone or grind the shaped bevel will ruin the cutter. The idea of cutting a a dummy hone and coating it with abrasive, means the very soon the cutter will have no relief; it will be like honing a 45degree bevel on a blade for a 45degree bedding-angle plane.
We are talking about a hand plane that can have different shaped irons inserted for use

edit typo
 
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D_W

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Thanks for this. I ended up using a medium/fine Arkansas slip followed by a few strokes on the mdf profile/rouge combination to finish. Gave excellent result, so I think this will be the way to go.

that should do it - most of the combo plane irons are a bit soft, so arks should do just fine for general maintenance. If you can manage to tolerate the profiled cutters long enough to have to grind them (vs. going to moulding planes in general, which support the cut a lot better and generally give a neater result if everything isn't perfect - and much faster), you'll be in the minority.

I have had a half dozen or so older combination planes and none of them has much wear on any of the cutters.
 
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