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Sharpening Jig - What do you think?

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David C

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It takes a lot to beat the old Eclipse 36 honing guide. I don't fancy these sleds.

David
 

JobandKnock

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It takes a lot to beat the old Eclipse 36 honing guide.
When trying to teach raw apprentices I've always started them on "training wheels" (Eclipse 36 jig or a snide version of same) so they gain an understanding of how sharp they need to aim for. Once they understand that and are getting consistency they can be weaned off the jig onto "figure of 8" honing. The problem these days is the omnipresent cordless tools which have made a lot of hand tools redundant for these lads who often don't understand the need for hand tools
 

JSW

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It would be interesting to get some input from site Joiners, as to whether they use a sharpening jig or not, I'll almost guarantee they don't, but then again does a site Joiner even use a hand plane anymore? Apart from maybe a block plane as a finessing tool for sharp edges etc.
Similarly with Bench Hand Joiners, Cabinet Makers, Fine furniture etc, again I'll wager it's all done freehand.

Nothing wrong with a jig like the Eclipse 36 as a training tool as @JobandKnock says. I have one, use it once a blue moon for trueing up, but it never comes out when a blade needs sharpening.
 

Jacob

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It would be interesting to get some input from site Joiners, as to whether they use a sharpening jig or not, I'll almost guarantee they don't, but then again does a site Joiner even use a hand plane anymore? Apart from maybe a block plane as a finessing tool for sharp edges etc.
Similarly with Bench Hand Joiners, Cabinet Makers, Fine furniture etc, again I'll wager it's all done freehand.

Nothing wrong with a jig like the Eclipse 36 as a training tool as @JobandKnock says. I have one, use it once a blue moon for trueing up, but it never comes out when a blade needs sharpening.
I did a lot of work site fitting stuff made in the workshop and yes used planes a lot: 5 1/2, 220, 78 etc. 78 is actually very versatile and useful besides its nominal use.
Sharpening freehand only - it's easier, quicker and time is money.
Ditto in the workshop.
Jigs for amateurs only, though I did have a go to see if I was missing out on anything.
There's such a lot of detailed description of "correct" methods - mainly from magazines, very little in books ancient or modern. The "correct" methods even have their own terminology; "primary/secondary"bevel etc. Difficult to shake off and discover that rounded bevel perfectly OK etc.
 
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JSW

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I did a lot of work site fitting stuff made in the workshop and yes used planes a lot: 5 1/2, 220, 78 etc. 78 is actually very versatile and useful besides its nominal use.
That would fit under the banner of Shopfitting? But yes I take your point, and the 78 is indeed a very versatile tool.
Site Joinery I would term as to be House bashing, 1st and 2nd fix, price work etc, or at least it is/was, I got out of that particular game donkeys years ago, hated it with a passion.
 

Jacob

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That would fit under the banner of Shopfitting? But yes I take your point, and the 78 is indeed a very versatile tool.
Site Joinery I would term as to be House bashing, 1st and 2nd fix, price work etc, or at least it is/was, I got out of that particular game donkeys years ago, hated it with a passion.
Mostly period restoration - sash windows followed by window boards, architraves, sometimes shutters and panelling. Doors etc and so on
 

JSW

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Ah, gotcha, nice work! I did a couple of Barn conversions once upon a time, that was great work to do, very small company, Brickie and his mate, couple of general labourers, Joiner Foreman and me. The owner (Did all the Plumbing) spotted me working one day and asked if I was interested in joining, which I did. The Joiner/Foreman did the old school work, mainly reinstating the Oak roof beams, and I did all the interior work, all period stuff. Best job I ever had, great great team. I was 33 at the time, back in the early 90's, so had to prove myself capable.

Anyways enough of all that, forgot to mention this.

There's such a lot of detailed description of "correct" methods - mainly from magazines, very little in books ancient or modern. The "correct" methods even have their own terminology; "primary/secondary"bevel etc. Difficult to shake off and discover that rounded bevel perfectly OK etc.
Not forgetting "Micro-Bevel" & "Charlesworth Ruler Trick" © Rob Cosman
 
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