Setup for a beginner - really long shopping list

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AJB Temple

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Very good list Pete. Reading through it I am missing purfling and binding tools, and the kind of fine tools used for making inlays.
 

Jacob

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Haven't followed this thread so may be repeating:
cutting sheets or ripping long pieces over a TS in a small space
cut sheets down to handleable size first by hand, but with reference to your cutting list of course
ditto long pieces - cut to length by hand first
 

PeteCo

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Very good list Pete. Reading through it I am missing purfling and binding tools, and the kind of fine tools used for making inlays.

Indeed AJB , I ran out of time earlier tbh

You can do the binding channels with a suitable router binding bit (offset bearing ) and handheld 1/4 router ( Makita , Bosch, DeWalt etc ) with a suitable jig or perspex base ( and a steady hand ! )
For inlays (I've personally very little experience of doing this yet ) a Dremel or similar multi tool with dentist drill bits and a Dremel router base. I use a Black & Decker multi tool with a base bought from a UK supplier ( the StewMac base was too expensive without having an existing annual account )

A fine jewellers saw will also be useful.

I'd also second the guitar neck vise posted earlier - I'm gonna buy one of those myself !!

As mentioned a few times , buy as you go - so you know what you really need.
 

Sachakins

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Here's a good solution for shop dust, sound and compressor setup
 

Roland

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Like @PeteCo I started by making guitars. I was advised only to buy tools when I really needed them. (There is more than one way to do most tasks.) For my first build I used a jig saw, a router, and a drill on a stand, which I already had, and bought a palm sander. I made sanding bobbins to fit the drill, and a sliding frame which allows me to use the router to thin and flatten surfaces. For chip collection I used a Henry vacuum.

My first purchase was a floor standing pillar drill. This has been very useful, especially for accurate drilling of string-through and tuner holes. For necks I bought a spoke shave, cabinet scrapers, and a narrow kerf saw for fret slots. Having realised to problem of dust I bought a Numatic extractor and an Axminster air cleaner from this forum. I’ve since added a vortex and large plastic bucket like @sachakins‘ to separate chips from dust.

With a couple of builds under my belt I went to see a professional guitar builder for advice about bandsaws. His advice was don’t buy one unless you want to make your own veneers. Instead get a table saw. If you need to split a panel, for example to make book matched tops, you can use the table saw around the edges. These will guide a crosscut saw or Japanese pull saw to finish the job.

My next purchase will either be a table saw or a table top thicknesser, depending on what my next project is.
 

Jacob

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.....
... If you need to split a panel, for example to make book matched tops, you can use the table saw around the edges. These will guide a crosscut saw or Japanese pull saw to finish the job.
....
Or for big pieces a rip hand saw in the TS slots.
 
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