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Series 2, land rover, soft top

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Jameshow

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How about an ultima apparently MacLean used one as a mule to develop Thier own hypercars.

Cheers James
 

ey_tony

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In the late 80s and early 90's I ran a petrol SWB 1968 Series 11A land rover with truck cab and canvas tilt which needed quite a bit of restoration including a half chassis which someone I knew fitted for me . The rest of the parts I fitted myself at the time were quite reasonable priced and very easy to fit.

I bought it to tow a horse box for my two daughter's pony to take to shows. They also used to muck out and throw the material into the back and we'd drop it off on my friend's muck pile in his small-holding, the back of the LR was then hosed out ready for use again. It was the one vehicle where we didn't care whether our boots were clean or dirty.

My late wife used it as a runabout for four years and loved driving it. She used work for the police in their station custody suite on shift work and it never let her down once and she could turn out in all weathers and know she'd get there even if there was a snow storm! I also used it as a tow vehicle for a caravan we purchased. A great all-round towing vehicle and no wonder it was the farmer's choice.

Mine was fitted with LR big steel wheels and tyres to match. They looked like truck tyres and the spare wheel was mounted on the bonnet which due to its weight made it almost impossible to lift and you had to peer over it when driving but it looked super with the head-lights mounted in the radiator grill and its galvanised girder-bumpers and adjustable height tow hitch.
I resprayed it and the wheels with Tractol paint which I bought from the local agricultural shop and it looked almost like new when I'd finished and when I eventually sold it a few years later, I was inundated with calls from potential buyers for weeks after it had gone on the first day.

A word of caution. The big wheels/tyres make the vehicle look great but If the LR is to be used for the purpose for which it was intended in 4WD in off-road farming type conditions such as towing in and out of fields etc then my advice would be to fit 'narrow' wheels. The narrow wheels don't look as good aesthetically but big tyres tend to sit on and slip on top of the soft surface rather than bite in. That's why most farmers never changed the wheels...the smaller ones were best.

However big tyres and wheels make the ride more comfortable, give better fuel economy and give more speed so there are benefits and trade-offs but I found when driving on even a few inches of snow with the big wheels, then I invariably had to engage 4WD as the big tyres, on the rear just didn't, even with excellent treads, dig in sufficiently unless there was plenty of weight in the back.

There's no synchromesh on 1st and 2nd gear so it takes a bit of getting used to which means getting the revs correct when changing into lower gears on the move and they are a bit thirsty in comparison to a regular car but not that bad and once I'd gone over the vehicle and repaired what needed doing, it never cost much to run. Nothing went wrong as there wasn't much to go wrong.

Everything about a LR from that period shouts commercial. The old LWB models were not as good for towing as their SWB counterparts as the turning circle made them more difficult to handle so the SWB is the one to go for unless you want to carry people in the back where the LWB is better for that purpose.. They are primitive but very simple to maintain. The engines were really good and reliable and would run seemingly forever but the valve seals were prone to leaking hence there was often the ubiquitous cloud of blue smoke when first started up from cold. However, once they were warmed up the smoke invariably disappeared when restarting from warm which is why many were never repaired.

I look back with fond memories of my old SWB and if I was younger I might even have a go at buying another for restoration. They fetch amazing money and if bought right, will be a good longer term investment.
 

doctor Bob

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I'm hopefully having a closer look at it this weekend, I think if we can agree on a price I'll probably have it.
I'll post pic's if it happens.
 

Bod

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If my BiL's experience is anything to go by, then any LR, no matter how decrept, will be stolen!

Bod
 

Fergie 307

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Fun vehicles, utterly basic. Mine were reliable, usually easily fixed when they did have problems. Parts are easy to come by, but so much of what is on the market is world-changing trash, and the best quality worthwhile parts cost more.

What you get..
Cheap to run except on fuel, I'd get 21mpg on a run with overdrive. Off road, a fraction of that.
Cachet.
The pinnacle of British automotive engineering.
A never ending battle against rust.

What you don't get..
Legroom, (109s have more than the 88s though)
Cargo space though see legroom above.
Comfort,
The ability to drive at over 45mph without thinking that Armageddon is happening under the bonnet.
Somewhere for your right elbow.
Heat from the heater.
Security, esp with a soft top.

I've video of one of my mates in his s2 88 rescuing a stuck jeep wrangler in Wales, oh how we laughed.
Pinnacle of British automotive engineering ??? Perhaps you are unaware that the prototype was based on a Jeep, and used Jeep running gear. I went on a factory visit back in the 80's and I can tell you the way they were put together was as agricultural as the vehicle itself, guys using hydraulic jacks to bend the doors so the would actually fit and so on. And you missed reliability off your list of things you don't get. I'm reminded of the old Aussie joke, " if you want to go into the cutback take a Land Rover, if you want to come back again take a Landcruiser ". Anyone in a Wrangler needing to be rescued by a Landie should hang their head in shame. I had a chuckle in the other direction when one of their 4x4 mags tested a brand new Range Rover and a Disco. Both broke down and had to be rescued by their "recovery" vehicle, an XJ Cherokee !!
 

Trainee neophyte

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I grew up with everyone driving landrovers. Most of the neighbours had series II and III ex army beasts which had even fewer frills than normal. It was the standard farm vehicle and can be used and abused as such, but in terms of actually driving, they are awful. I needed a 4x4 but Landrovers are virtually unknown here, so I went with what is ubiquitous which is a Japanese pickup. I couldn't believe the difference. I will never set foot in a land rover again, probably, which is is a good thing because I don't fit. Nobody fits. The theme tune for landrovers is here.

My advice to @doctor Bob is to take it for a long test drive - the first 20 minutes will have huge grin factor, but then the pain will start: the deafness, the sore throat from shouting, left leg pain from the evil clutch, right elbow bruise, white finger disease from the (lack of) steering, and so on and so forth. You may love it - weirdly quite a lot of people do, despite everything. "Despite" is probably a really good word to sum up landrover aficionados, who love their landies despite pretty much everything.
 

doctor Bob

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I think evryone is missing the fact that this is mint, it won't be used for ploughing, it will not go through mud, it will not be driven 200 miles in one hit. I imagine I'll do 200 miles a year in it, it will never see rain or a wet road, it will be garaged always.
It's a collectors item, but will make me smile.
No one would drive the lotus for comfort and reliability either.
 

julianf

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chassis was powder coated I think...
If the chassis is powdercoated, then that would significantly devalue the car, as you would have to wonder what other madness the builder had considered sensible.
 

selectortone

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I think evryone is missing the fact that this is mint, it won't be used for ploughing, it will not go through mud, it will not be driven 200 miles in one hit. I imagine I'll do 200 miles a year in it, it will never see rain or a wet road, it will be garaged always.
It's a collectors item, but will make me smile.
No one would drive the lotus for comfort and reliability either.
If covid has taught us anything it's that life is too short. If you can afford it buy the damn thing and have some fun.

I bought an MX-5 6 weeks ago. Never owned a roadster, always wanted one. See above.
 

doctor Bob

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If the chassis is powdercoated, then that would significantly devalue the car, as you would have to wonder what other madness the builder had considered sensible.
I shall find out, this is all guess work. May have been galvanised. I won't part with dough until I've had it looked at by a specialist, did the same thing with the lotus.
 

Spectric

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Since they stopped making the real Defender all the earlier models have gone up in value, probably because they now only make SUV's and no proper all terrain vehicles.
 

julianf

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I shall find out, this is all guess work. May have been galvanised. I won't part with dough until I've had it looked at by a specialist, did the same thing with the lotus.
Powder over hot dip wouldn't be so bad, but would still make you wonder what they were thinking of.

I have a few landrovers. A 101, a couple of 300tdis and a modern one (fl2) which isn't really in the same class.

A 300tdi defender 110 is my "dream car". I just need to put it back together again.
 

paulrbarnard

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Since they stopped making the real Defender all the earlier models have gone up in value, probably because they now only make SUV's and no proper all terrain vehicles.
I have the last real defender, a 110 CSW 300Tdi. It was all down hill from there 😜Two owners from new. I bought it 17 years ago with 16000 miles on the clock. It is waiting for some spare cash to sort the body work out. The metal mice have been munching the alloy.
 

Spectric

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A lot of people thought stainless fasteners were a good idea but with alloy body and steel the galvanic corosion could be worse. My old girl is a 300TDi and needs a new set of wheels and tyres plus some of the more common faults sorted like corroded front spheres and steering drop arm bearing.
 

novocaine

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If covid has taught us anything it's that life is too short. If you can afford it buy the damn thing and have some fun.

I bought an MX-5 6 weeks ago. Never owned a roadster, always wanted one. See above.
Friend of mine has just bought one. Havent had the heart to ask when his salon opens. 😁
Fun facts. Series 1 and the mini share the same wheelbase.
Mx5 and mini clubman do too.
So i wonder........... mwah ha ha. Body swap.
 

Trainee neophyte

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My fault - I don't get collecting. Things are for using, not polishing. In no way is that a criticism - different strokes etc. I would horrify most collectors by using your landrover for proper farmwork until such time as I wore it out. That's what Landrovers are for in my mind. For you it is pride of ownership and an investment. For me it's a very uncomfortable part of my youth, and we have Toyota and Mitsubishi to thank for advances in technology.

BTW, why won't you use it for plowing? It's fun, unless you have 500 acres to get done before it rains.
 

doctor Bob

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My fault - I don't get collecting. Things are for using, not polishing. In no way is that a criticism - different strokes etc. I would horrify most collectors by using your landrover for proper farmwork until such time as I wore it out. That's what Landrovers are for in my mind. For you it is pride of ownership and an investment. For me it's a very uncomfortable part of my youth, and we have Toyota and Mitsubishi to thank for advances in technology.

BTW, why won't you use it for plowing? It's fun, unless you have 500 acres to get done before it rains.
Wouldn't horrify me at all, if you want to blow big dough on a land rover and wreck it that's fine if it floats your boat. Would you really spend say £25k on a LR and wreck it or would you buy a beaten up one?
For me it's fun. a day out with the mrs in tow, take it to the beach etc, not sure pride comes into it, pride for me is mainly family, business and morals, investment, again I think I could make more by investing in other stuff.
Like you say horses for courses, my choices are harmless to others I hope.
 

Trainee neophyte

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Would you really spend say £25k on a LR and wreck it or would you buy a beaten up one?
I don't see the value in an old landrover, and therein lies the problem. Oodles of people disagree with me, so I'm obviously in the minority (or just wrong). I knew a guy who collected 1950s buses - he thought they were fabulous, and I didn't get that, either. This is very much my failing, not yours.

I am absolutely sure that you and your landrover will be very happy together.
 

Fergie 307

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Wouldn't horrify me at all, if you want to blow big dough on a land rover and wreck it that's fine if it floats your boat. Would you really spend say £25k on a LR and wreck it or would you buy a beaten up one?
For me it's fun. a day out with the mrs in tow, take it to the beach etc, not sure pride comes into it, pride for me is mainly family, business and morals, investment, again I think I could make more by investing in other stuff.
Like you say horses for courses, my choices are harmless to others I hope.
As a Jeep man I'd rather spend quite a bit less money on a nice WW2 era military Jeep, a truly iconic vehicle, and a much better head turner/talking point than any Landie will ever be. But whatever floats your boat, if you love them, as many do, then go for it. It's your money and your fun, doesn't matter what anyone else thinks. Good luck with it.
 
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