Self- Sharpening Chainsaw - Really?

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Yojevol

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After many years of use it was time to replace my Bosch electric chainsaw. I decided to go for one of these new-fangled self-sharpening jobbies. Oregon have a good name and they were on at an attractive price at Screwfix so that's the way I went.
My first attempt to use it was a complete disappointment. The cut was very slow, producing tiny shavings and dust from newly felled oak. I couldn't understand it. The teeth were very sharp as evidenced by the blooded nicks on my hands from the assembly stage (must wear gloves in future). I studied the chain closely and this is what I found:-
View attachment 135870
Chainsaw teeth.JPG

Comparing a conventional tooth form with the the self-sharpener, the new saw with its built in stone, grinds away the top surface of the tooth, thus reducing the depth of cut. The best cut depth I could measure was about 0.3mm as against well over 1mm on a conventional chain.
I couldn't see how the cutting ability could ever be improved.
So I decided to purchase a convectional chain appropriate for this saw. They're readily available.
The first cut with it was a revelation. Using the full blade length, it whipped through an 18" log with no trouble at all.
I cannot understand how they managed to come up with this sharpening idea. It seems a fundamentally flawed design to me.
Has anybody else had this experience?
Brian
 

Jameshow

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After many years of use it was time to replace my Bosch electric chainsaw. I decided to go for one of these new-fangled self-sharpening jobbies. Oregon have a good name and they were on at an attractive price at Screwfix so that's the way I went.
My first attempt to use it was a complete disappointment. The cut was very slow, producing tiny shavings and dust from newly felled oak. I couldn't understand it. The teeth were very sharp as evidenced by the blooded nicks on my hands from the assembly stage (must wear gloves in future). I studied the chain closely and this is what I found:-
View attachment 135870 View attachment 135873
Comparing a conventional tooth form with the the self-sharpener, the new saw with its built in stone, grinds away the top surface of the tooth, thus reducing the depth of cut. The best cut depth I could measure was about 0.3mm as against well over 1mm on a conventional chain.
I couldn't see how the cutting ability could ever be improved.
So I decided to purchase a convectional chain appropriate for this saw. They're readily available.
The first cut with it was a revelation. Using the full blade length, it whipped through an 18" log with no trouble at all.
I cannot understand how they managed to come up with this sharpening idea. It seems a fundamentally flawed design to me.
Has anybody else had this experience?
Brian

Imho

It's not the self sharpening that's the issue it's the limiter that precedes the cutting face that's the issue.

Give them a good file down and all should be well.....
 

artie

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As James says it's the cut depth limiter that needs to be redone.
 

heimlaga

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I woyuld call those self sharpening chains a marketing trick aimed at clueless consumers suceptible to such cons. The cutting angles end up all wrong requiring too high limiters which in turn reduced efficiency to almost nothing.

Learning to sharpen an ordinary chain with a file isn't that hard.
 

clogs

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shopping.jpeg

just get one of these, pretty much all the same from £25.....
I've had mine for years and must have sharpened 100'ds of chains....
when I lived in France the standard cost to sharpen a chain was €15.... this machine at a little more than double the price was worth a chance.....
still on the original disc....
now gotta be 20 years old...plus u dont need to waste time n fuel getting ur's sharpened....
 

RobinBHM

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Takes just a few minutes with a round file sharpening a chain, without taking it off.

on eBay it’s possible to buy a box of 10 files, Oregon brand. Files blunten quickly, so it’s worth renewing.
 

Sandyn

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I woyuld call those self sharpening chains a marketing trick aimed at clueless consumers suceptible to such cons.
That's me!!! :LOL: :LOL: I have a self sharpening chain saw. It is an Oregon and it works very very well. My personal experience is that the saw I have is absolutely not a con. It really does work. I don't measure any of the geometry of the blade, I judge by how well it cuts. I have had it for quite a few years and still on the original chain. I also have a conventional petrol chain saw. The self sharpening is my choice every time ( as long as I have a power cable long enough!)

Which brand of self sharpening electric saw did you have? perhaps some are worse than others?

I don't think the Oregon is suitable for really heavy use. Not because of the chain, but the saw construction is/materials are aimed at lower cost. It's only £130. It is aimed at the 'DIY' end of the market.
I have all the gear for sharpening a chain, but can't be bothered when the self sharpening works so well.

To @Yojevol My experience using the saw is that it cuts faster than the chips can be cleared. The last tree I cut down was an oak. It went through it like a hot knife through butter. Yours must be a bummer, but I can't imagine what would be wrong with a brand new saw. As you say the teeth are very very sharp, quite different design to conventional chains.
I originally got the saw to cut up a large diameter fallen tree for my sister-in-law. My petrol saw was too small. I was expecting to throw the Oregon away after doing the tree, but it far exceeded my expectations, still going strong, cutting well.
 
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