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Sealing Beech worktops

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paisawood

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Hello,

I have to install a beech worktop (ikea) for my daughter next week and am wondering how best to seal the cut edges of the sink and hob cutouts and aso the worktop join. In the past I have used the Screwfix worktop sealant on postformed worktops but not sure that this would be the right thing for a solid wood worktop.

I had wondered about using waterproof pva, but any ideas would be welcome.

Many thanks.

David
 

tim

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Danish oil is all I'd recommend - make sure you seal underneath as well. Use at least 3 coats initially, following instructions on wiping off, scuffing back etc and then maybe another coat every 3 months for the first year and then once a year after that.

Cheers

Tim
 

Aragorn

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Another vote for Danish Oil here. Or finishing oil. Or specific Worktop oils (which are probably just Danish oil relabelled).
Don't use PVA.
Like Tim says, at least three coats on both top and bottom. Lightly sand back inbetween. The more coats the better, and you can build up a really nice hardwearing finish with Finishing oil with 6 or so coats.
Endgrain and all cut-outs e.g. sink/hob need at least 5 coats.
 

paisawood

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Sorry folks, I didn't make myself clear. :oops:

Danish oil sounds like the right solution for the surface, but I was thinking about a sealer for the cut endgrain hidden under the hob and sink. I will only get one chance to seal these and a single coat of oil doesn't sound like a lifetime solution!

Regards

David
 

jasonB

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As the others say Oil is the best way to go, whatever one you are using to treat the rest of the worktop.

You say yo will not get a chance for more than one coat, you really need to treat the underside the same amount of times as the top so the cutout can be done at the same time, don't be tempted to treat it like a laminate top and fit it all in a day, let it sit in the kitchen to aclimatise for at least a week before fitting, then cut it to size inc cutouts then take it off and start oiling. If you don't treat both sides the same there is a risk of cupping.

If you are doing the cutouts in a pre oiled top then a wipe of clear silicon will do, don't forget the inside of any tap holes as these can react with the metal and stain the wood.

Jason
 

tim

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Jason

Was just about to write the same thig :!: If its a lifetime of use you are after then taking a bit longer in installation really won't make any difference.

T
 

Keith Smith

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I would use an oil for the worktop but where the sink and taps etc are fitted I would use Extramite adhesive to seal the end grain. Some fitters use paint others silicon sealant but I wouldn't rely on oil to permanently seal this vulnerable area.

Keith
 

Neil

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KeithS":1vnb10is said:
where the sink and taps etc are fitted I would use Extramite adhesive to seal the end grain
I'm glad you said that, Keith, as its exactly what I did when I installed our beech worktop about 5 years ago - I haven't had any problems with it since :)

Cheers,
Neil
 

tim

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Extramite is the best stuff to use for sure (or Cascamite (spelling?))
I'd not heard that before - useful to know - do you just use it at ordinary strength or dilute it?

Cheers

T
 

Aragorn

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Tim
You mix it up to a consistancy where it will spread well - i.e. quite thick and pastey, not too runny. This would be normal strength I suppose.
I think there are instructions of dilution on the tins for sealing endgrain :?
 

Shady

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If you don't have access to cheapo extramite, epoxy, heated into the grain with a gun, will achieve an even better seal - and it's definitely lifetime....

I use it on things like dinghy rudder end grain, and it copes with sea water immersion/complete submersion: kitchen splashing will not touch it...
 

tim

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I have to say that although I am definitely impressed by the extramite/ epoxy options I have a beech worktop that I put in at home 5 years ago. I did only use Danish oil and there is no water ingress to date. The top was last oiled c 8 months ago. HAven't touched anything else except for the 4 coats I gave it when I put it in. Not saying that the other options aren't better, just that this one is doing okay.

T
 

paisawood

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Many thanks for all of the suggestions.

I think that I will follow the extramite route for the cut edges and for the worktop joint, but will use Danish oil both on top and underneath. Will also leave the top to condition for as long as possible before fixing down.

Thanks again.

David
 

Shady

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Ya, sorry, maybe I wasn't clear enough: I totally agree with the oil for the 'visible' surfaces: It does the job well, and is easily repairable. Epoxy for the 'hidden' end grain bits... Good luck.
 
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