• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Scrub plane choice

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

No skills

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2011
Messages
2,558
Reaction score
1
Location
Hanging by my fingertips
Hi folks,

I fancy getting an old plane and setting it up as a scrub, are there any rough guidelines as to what size is preferable? or does it not really matter?

I see a fair few cheap #4's on evilbay at the moment, would one of those do?

Ta!

:)
 

jettagreg

Established Member
Joined
22 Mar 2012
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
Location
Burton on Trent
Hey,

I set up a cheap GTL no.4 as a scrub just to see if it would work. I ground a radius on the blade using a roll of tape as a template. I also opened up the mouth of the plane with a file. this allows the much bigger chippings to move through. make sure the rear handle is good and strong or you might bust it.
 

condeesteso

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2011
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
0
Location
Sevenoaks, Kent
Generally I think a longer sole is ideal for a scrub, but it depends a bit on what scale you are working on. I tend to use mine on panels and particularly those that don't fit the planer. Personally I would go for something in the range No5 / No6. And I would like to recommend an old woodie for the job. They can be found easily at bargain prices (£5 ebay, shift the decimal left for boot fair :shock: ). They are very easy to set up with a big camber, and light to use which is a real bonus when working a larger area.
I have a Record 6 set up as a 'semi-scrub' (a fair camber) and that works very well too... I think that one cost me over 30 quid though, ouch!
And before someone says an old woodie will be trouble, tired etc... just look for a clean one, decent ebay pics, no split in body where wedge goes, no big repairs etc. I think the vast majority are in fine form, and most have been in boxes for years anyway. Outstanding planes for so little investment.
 

Pete Maddex

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2005
Messages
9,172
Reaction score
124
Location
Nottingham
Hi,

Wait untill Aldi/Lidl have a woodie smoother for sale again and camber the blade.
I picked one up a couple of weeks after they where on sale for a reduced price.

Pete
 

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
1
Location
North Suffolk
cambournepete":3upxdwui said:
My Veritas scrub is roughly the same size as my number 4 plane for the purposes of comparison
A "normal" #4 doesn't quite have enough space between the tote and the frog for vigorous scrubbing IME. I would recommend a #5, if you feel you must start with a Bailey.

My actually recommendation would be to either make one (Krenov style) or convert a wooden jack plane (or just USE a wooden jack plane with a little more camber than usual).

Personally, I converted:

http://web.archive.org/web/200901141057 ... scrub.html

BugBear
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
I use a scrub:



...from Dieter Schmid which has a very narrow, but deeply cambered blade. I wasn't sure I'd use it tbh, but it's the first port of call to remove all the crud from the surface of a board before the p/t - Rob
 

Tony Spear

Established Member
Joined
6 Apr 2006
Messages
895
Reaction score
0
Location
Hinton Waldrist
Some years ago I got hold of a Stanley 4 1/2 opened the mouth and ground a heavy camber on the iron. Possibly because of the weight of the plane and the width of the iron it worked beautifully. Unfortunately I lent it to somebody and never got it back.
 

János

Established Member
Joined
8 Dec 2010
Messages
252
Reaction score
0
Hello,

A traditional wooden scrub plane is about 250 mm long. The metal bodied varieties held to this same size. A no.4 or any other wide bladed plane would be a bad choice for a scrub, as the wide blade requires very high force to initiate a cut (not to mention the wide marks left behind the blade). Scrub planes have narrow blades: 30~38 mm is standard. Such a narrow blade can take a very deep cut (especially in straight grained softwoods, like deal), requires less force to push it through, and leaves narrow marks behind. My scrub is a traditional German pattern horned one, not dissimilar to Rob's ECE, but much cheaper. :wink: French ones are (generally) "unhorned".

Have a nice day,

János
 

cadders75

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2005
Messages
54
Reaction score
0
I use a crappy pressed steel draper "plane" with a cambered blade, the mouth is big enough to drive my pick up through but it's small, light and easy to use.
 

DTR

Established Member
Joined
11 Mar 2011
Messages
1,870
Reaction score
6
Location
Essex
János":p7qtlwqd said:
A no.4 or any other wide bladed plane would be a bad choice for a scrub, as the wide blade requires very high force to initiate a cut (not to mention the wide marks left behind the blade). Scrub planes have narrow blades: 30~38 mm is standard. Such a narrow blade can take a very deep cut
Is the width of the blade really an issue when it is steeply cambered? The way I understand it the width of the blade actually in use is proportional to the depth of cut (and the degree of camber).

To expand on that slightly, a wider plane would be pointless (but not unusable) as the full width of the cambered blade could only be used for impossibly deep cuts.
 

No skills

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2011
Messages
2,558
Reaction score
1
Location
Hanging by my fingertips
Evening all,

Good info so far, thanks!

I'll round up my thoughts so far... (shouldnt take long :D )

Number 4 (or same sized other) could be used, and is by some - but others prefer something a bit longer.
Scrub irons are very narrow.
Hadnt considered a wooden one tbh, I think the currently available storage area wouldnt suit one either.
Almost any brand or type could be used, but I think I'd like something that would have a fairly durable iron * so probably rule out the el cheapo brands.


If I buy a plane with a fairly wide iron is there any reason I cant just narrow it then camber it for the prefered narrow size?

For anybody interested I was looking on ebay for wooden planes and found a little collection for sale in essex for not a lot of money, collection only tho.


* quite probably a side effect of being on here too much #-o
 

condeesteso

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2011
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
0
Location
Sevenoaks, Kent
Yes Jim, many thanks and what a brilliant little plane:
Sorby1.jpg

A small Sorby scrub, 6" long, blade 1 1/2" width
Sorby2.jpg

It's in amazing condition and is a real treat to use. Ideal I think for smaller boards and I will use it when the opportunity arises to create a scrubbed finish on a panel underside say. Whilst a scrub is for first stage preparation, why not use it as a finishing tool - quite like using an adze to surface an exposed oak beam... very 'hand-made'.
In your debt again, Jim =D>
 

Attachments

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
1
Location
North Suffolk
DTR":9ee3xxis said:
János":9ee3xxis said:
A no.4 or any other wide bladed plane would be a bad choice for a scrub, as the wide blade requires very high force to initiate a cut (not to mention the wide marks left behind the blade). Scrub planes have narrow blades: 30~38 mm is standard. Such a narrow blade can take a very deep cut
Is the width of the blade really an issue when it is steeply cambered? The way I understand it the width of the blade actually in use is proportional to the depth of cut (and the degree of camber).

To expand on that slightly, a wider plane would be pointless (but not unusable) as the full width of the cambered blade could only be used for impossibly deep cuts.
You are quite correct - the two planes I have used in this regard are "normal" woodies, with 2" and over blades, but they do indeed take narrow shavings due to the combination of depth setting and camber.

I suspect that a minor side benefit of this is excellent shaving clearance, since the shaving is nowhere near the arms of the wedge, precluding any possibility of jamming.

BugBear
 

condeesteso

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2011
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
0
Location
Sevenoaks, Kent
Totally agree BB - I think a woodie jack for a fiver makes an outstanding scrub, and a very good starting point. The ECE of Rob's is probably excellent too and not silly at 60 euros - but those old woodie jacks usually have really thick irons which is a real benefit on a scrub (just set the cap further back to allow for the big camber, the iron is stiff enough anyway). Another thing about the woodies is their light weight - so your effort is going into the cut rather than shifting a mass of metal around.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
2
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
condeesteso":14hlaldt said:
Yes Jim, many thanks and what a brilliant little plane:

A small Sorby scrub, 6" long, blade 1 1/2" width

It's in amazing condition and is a real treat to use. Ideal I think for smaller boards and I will use it when the opportunity arises to create a scrubbed finish on a panel underside say. Whilst a scrub is for first stage preparation, why not use it as a finishing tool - quite like using an adze to surface an exposed oak beam... very 'hand-made'.
In your debt again, Jim =D>
Ah...yes...she is a beauty indeed...but there is another hundred or so bootfairs left this year so I shall be on the lookout for similar sized planes..or..if needs must I fancy making one out of beech and lignum vitae...perhaps this will be the first of a number of sliding dovetail designs! :wink:

The key is getting the iron...that is a wonderful piece of steel and the tapered ones are easy to come by...though perhaps less so in that size and age.

I think a photo of the scalloping would be nice with that width plane...I think that is part of the beauty of it...if you get around to it mate. I am 100% with you on the use of these planes to figure the wood...on old oak that would be a wonderful feature...an oak blanket box perhaps? 8)

Jim
 

No skills

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2011
Messages
2,558
Reaction score
1
Location
Hanging by my fingertips
Nice little plane, those and the wooden molding planes would end up being a collection or two quite easily 8) luckly I have nowhere suitable to keep them and no money to 'invest' in any :)

Still the tool budget is set for the month and the task is at hand...

(hammer)
 

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
1
Location
North Suffolk
condeesteso":1l8pxtrw said:
Yes Jim, many thanks and what a brilliant little plane:

A small Sorby scrub, 6" long, blade 1 1/2" width

It's in amazing condition and is a real treat to use. Ideal I think for smaller boards and I will use it when the opportunity arises to create a scrubbed finish on a panel underside say. Whilst a scrub is for first stage preparation, why not use it as a finishing tool - quite like using an adze to surface an exposed oak beam... very 'hand-made'.
In your debt again, Jim =D>
Is that single or double iron? Who did the conversion (cambering of the iron)?

BugBear
 

Latest posts

Top