Scroll saw

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Could anyone here please advise me on type of scroll saw to buy it will be used on aluminium 99% of the time
Cheap or second hand expensive
It will be used from 1.5-3mm aluminium sheet mainly for cutting discs,
Doubt I'll be doing anything real intricate
I've looked at a few of the more expensive ones but maybe it's overkill for what I need
I need the ability to dill a hole and feed the blade through for flanges 20220504_212937.jpg 20220504_193820.jpg 20220504_102037.jpg 20220506_101939.jpg
 

AES

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It's more about the blade that you choose for the job than the scroll saw itself.

Just about any machine will do that job, from cheapo to a real expensive one. The 2 most important things to look for to do that work regularly IMO are, 1: Easy/quick blade changing, and ; 2. variable speed.

Re blades, there's a sticky at the top of the Scrolling and Scroll Saw section here detailing a lot of info about where to source blades and what type to buy. It includes down-loadable tables you can keep and print out. Personally I prefer Pegas blades (they do a good range of metal cutting blades) but other brands are detailed there too.

I'm assuming you're new to scrolling/metal cutting, so you'll find the above-suggested variable speed very useful until you get used to the job, and having a quick change blade facility (ideally tool-less) will be much less frustrating as you talk about needing to thread the blade through a hole for every disc you cut.

If buying from the cheapo end of the range (e.g. the Lidl and Aldi saws that pop up from time to time, and they're just one example, there are MANY cheapo Chinese machines with various badges and in various colours), either SH or new, do check that the blade carrying arm is not warped. Do this by fitting a blade, any blade, and carefully observe the movement of the blade while running at slow speed. It should run vertically up and down, both when looking from directly in front and from 90 degrees to one side.

HTH
 
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It's more about the blade that you choose for the job than the scroll saw itself.

Just about any machine will do that job, from cheapo to a real expensive one. The 2 most important things to look for to do that work regularly IMO are, 1: Easy/quick blade changing, and ; 2. variable speed.

Re blades, there's a sticky at the top of the Scrolling and Scroll Saw section here detailing a lot of info about where to source blades and what type to buy. It includes down-loadable tables you can keep and print out. Personally I prefer Pegas blades (they do a good range of metal cutting blades) but other brands are detailed there too.

I'm assuming you're new to scrolling/metal cutting, so you'll find the above-suggested variable speed very useful until you get used to the job, and having a quick change blade facility (ideally tool-less) will be much less frustrating as you talk about needing to thread the blade through a hole for every disc you cut.

If buying from the cheapo end of the range (e.g. the Lidl and Aldi saws that pop up from time to time, and they're just one example, there are MANY cheapo Chinese machines with various badges and in various colours), either SH or new, do check that the blade carrying arm is not warped. Do this by fitting a blade, any blade, and carefully observe the movement of the blade while running at slow speed. It should run vertically up and down, both when looking from directly in front and from 90 degrees to one side.

HTH
Thankyou for the quick reply, there's a ferm 400 for sale local, I've also looked at a sealey from new, both around the same money, can either be changed to a quick change,
The machine I get will only be used from time to time,
Thankyou for the quick reply
 

AES

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Thankyou for the quick reply, there's a ferm 400 for sale local, I've also looked at a sealey from new, both around the same money, can either be changed to a quick change,
The machine I get will only be used from time to time,
Thankyou for the quick reply


Pleased to help gnarly. Just so happened I was on line when your Q came in.

Sorry I don't know either of those machines. If buying new, look at their specs on line (or visit the shop and look if possible). If SH, equally, ask the seller/go have a look.

Also worthwhile having a search here - I'm pretty sure both of those specific machines have come up from time to time, and there have been lots of threads about "converting" existing machines to quick blade change. Among others, Axminster sell little quick change converters, but they don't fit on all machines I think. Once you've settled on which of the above to buy, you can ask Axi if their converter will fit your chosen machine.

HTH
 

Droogs

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+1 For AES comments above. He beat me to it. The main factor is to make sure that whatever saw you get, it takes pinless blade or you will have a nightmare of a time with all those internal cuts.
 

AES

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Thanks to Droogs for adding that bit. I forgot to say that . He's dead right, pinless blades (instead of pinned blades) will make your life MUCH easier when doing lots of/all internal cuts Gnarly
 

Gordon Tarling

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If you're wanting to cut mainly large circular holes in sheet metal then there's probably better options than a scroll saw, such as flycutters, trepanning tools etc. However, if it's square or irregular shaped holes you'll be cutting, then a scroll saw is probably just the ticket!

G.
 

AES

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Good point Gordon. Since the OP specifically asked about scroll saws that what was answered, but depending on "the job", that MAY not be the best tool for the job.

@Gnarly customs: Show us a pic/drwg of what you'll be making and there's loads of people here who'll be happy to help.
 
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Steliz

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If you are buying second hand be absolutely sure that the blade clamps are included with the machine as they are expensive to buy separately.
 
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This will give you a bit of an idea of one of the items I wish to cut, all will probably be discs of some size and some with an internal hole ranging fro 60mm-180mm all aluminium I'd say 3-4mm max for flanges and 1.5-2mm for cap ends for powersteering pots etc 20220507_215210.jpg
 

Inspector

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If you are making variations of these ring/flanges I think you should consider a bench top CNC milling machine. You’ll be able to create new cutting programs from others you already have. New diameters or hole patterns, sizes and you can even cut bevels for welding. It also will give all your work more precision and consistency.

Pete
 
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If you are making variations of these ring/flanges I think you should consider a bench top CNC milling machine. You’ll be able to create new cutting programs from others you already have. New diameters or hole patterns, sizes and you can even cut bevels for welding. It also will give all your work more precision and consistency.

Pete im dipping my toes into new things that may or may not work out for me, I've looked at a few cnc routers and may go that route some day, but first I need to get people interested in what I'm producing and intise them away from their regular go to fabricators
 
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