Quantcast

Screwdrivers

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
I am renovating some old window frames. The brass screws have very narrow slots. The only screwdriver that I have that works is a 5.5mm (wide) electrician's insulated one. Can anyone recommend good quality fine slotted screwdrivers. Thanks Geoff
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
0
Location
Derbyshire
You can get all shapes and sizes but yes old screws tend to have thin slots so you may need to take a bit off the faces of the tip.
I've found over the years thats it's good to keep every screwdriver that comes your way. I've got dozens but still have to search through every now and then for one which will fit an old screw.
 

Paul Chapman

Established Member
Joined
26 Jan 2006
Messages
8,657
Reaction score
0
Location
Bookham, Surrey
There are so many different types of screw heads now that it seems impossible to have enough screwdrivers to fit all the ones you come across. Much better, in my experience, to use screwdrivers that take the various hexagonal bits that are used in cordless drill drivers. Werra make some good ones like this http://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/s ... /WER056653

If you're into Yankee screwdrivers, it's possible (with some difficulty) to get bit holders to fit them



Yes, I have a bit of a Yankee problem :oops: :lol:

Or if you are into wood turning, make your own



Hope this helps.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Andrewf

Established Member
Joined
18 Sep 2011
Messages
230
Reaction score
2
Location
Nr Maldon, Essex
Paul am impressed with the collection, I only have 3 of the big yankees.
Have never thought of looking for the adapters.
 

DTR

Established Member
Joined
11 Mar 2011
Messages
1,870
Reaction score
1
Location
Essex
Andrewf":ulut0bfb said:
Have never thought of looking for the adapters.
Make some yourself! Just take a magnetic drill / screwdriver bit adapter and file the end to match a Yankee bit. I found I had to use a longer than usual adapter though because the normal ones are a fraction too short.
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
Paul Chapman":2ojpkx9m said:
Or if you are into wood turning, make your own



Hope this helps.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
Made one of they this afternoon...English Walnut handle - Rob
 

TrimTheKing

Established Member
Joined
16 Mar 2007
Messages
2,108
Reaction score
0
Location
Grappenhall (Nr Warrington), Cheshire
Giff":bsqg0gow said:
I am renovating some old window frames. The brass screws have very narrow slots. The only screwdriver that I have that works is a 5.5mm (wide) electrician's insulated one. Can anyone recommend good quality fine slotted screwdrivers. Thanks Geoff
Not being funny, but if an electricians driver works then why do you need anything else?

Cheers
Mark
 

Paul Chapman

Established Member
Joined
26 Jan 2006
Messages
8,657
Reaction score
0
Location
Bookham, Surrey
woodbloke":3gllavsi said:
Paul Chapman":3gllavsi said:
Or if you are into wood turning, make your own



Hope this helps.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
Made one of they this afternoon...English Walnut handle - Rob
Where's the photos - you know the rules? :lol:

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
Paul Chapman":1sa0eb9r said:
woodbloke":1sa0eb9r said:
Paul Chapman":1sa0eb9r said:
Or if you are into wood turning, make your own



Hope this helps.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
Made one of they this afternoon...English Walnut handle - Rob
Where's the photos - you know the rules? :lol:
Cheers :wink:

Paul
I knew some smarter$e was going to come up with that one :lol: For your info Chappers, the second coat of oil is a-drying even now as fingers fly across the keys and when the third coat has dried off tomorrow and it's been waxed I'll take a pic :wink: - Rob
 

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
TrimTheKing":35olz9z4 said:
Giff":35olz9z4 said:
I am renovating some old window frames. The brass screws have very narrow slots. The only screwdriver that I have that works is a 5.5mm (wide) electrician's insulated one. Can anyone recommend good quality fine slotted screwdrivers. Thanks Geoff
Not being funny, but if an electricians driver works then why do you need anything else?

Cheers
Mark
The electrician wouldn't like it if I kept using his screwdriver. :wink:
 

nanscombe

Established Member
Joined
3 Feb 2010
Messages
614
Reaction score
0
Location
Kent, UK
It may be a daft suggestion but ...

Could you grind down the tip on an ordinary screwdriver to fit?

Or is the steel not suitable?

Just don't try and get it as sharp as your chisels. :shock:
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
Not being funny, but if an electricians driver works then why do you need anything else?
just speculating, but I believe the OP was saying that the sparkie's 5.5 was the only one where the tip was narrow enough to enagage the slot... I doubt very much it would have the width to span the full width of the slot, resulting in tear out of the screw head and possible damage to the driver tip too. Wood screw heads tend to be a lot wider than machine screws and can require a hellova lot more torque to get them turning.
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
As PaulC was casting nasturtiums on my spiny activities yesterday afternoon, this is my effort:



...at one of those screwdriver thingies with the magnetic holder. Handle in English Walnut, three coats of finishing oil, wax over the top. Someone may get one of these as a SS prezi in a few months time - Rob
 

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
Back to the question.....I was asking about suitable screwdrivers for older brass screws as I use this one, which I inherited, and does really well but was too wide for the 5.5mm heads I was removing. The old / painted brass screws are quite delicate and are easy to gouge.Jacobs suggestion about keeping and sourcing old screwdrivers seemed a good idea but do the still make smaller versions of this one ? Thanks Geoff
 

Attachments

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
11,789
Reaction score
172
Location
Bristol
Giff":27aqo0dc said:
Back to the question.....I was asking about suitable screwdrivers for older brass screws as I use this one, which I inherited, and does really well but was too wide for the 5.5mm heads I was removing. The old / painted brass screws are quite delicate and are easy to gouge.Jacobs suggestion about keeping and sourcing old screwdrivers seemed a good idea but do the still make smaller versions of this one ? Thanks Geoff

That sort - with a solid metal body and wooden scales riveted on - is called a 'perfect handle' screwdriver. They were made for a long time, and are collected and appreciated by those of us who understand these things - see this thread for example:
https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/all-for-a-screwdriver-t50937.html.

As far as I know there is no current commercial manufacture of them, so you'll need to get up early and haunt the car boot sales, or take a punt on eBay.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
0
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
The Perfect Handle screwdriver is ideal for this application and they are regularly available on FleaBay but expensive as they are quite collectible.

They are quite easy to find at bootfairs too....



...but tend to be pretty grubby...as I said in the other thread...they were very popular with mechanics as they are virtually indestructible.

You can fairly easily replace the scales though...this is Wych elm burr...



...which makes it pretty and useful!



Or you can just clean off the scales if the wood is good using lighter fuel to get rid of the grease and grime and then polish with Tru-Oil...



As you can see...the tip is very wide on this one though the screwdriver is quite small and useful.

Jim
 

Jacob

Established Member
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
16,119
Reaction score
0
Location
Derbyshire
jimi43":26aw7gs8 said:
.......they were very popular with mechanics as they are virtually indestructible......
And with joiners - not least because you can hammer them, as the steel goes right through. This is sometimes handy for loosening old screws.
You can (or used to be able to) get plastic handled screwdrivers with the tang going right through, which are useful for the same reason.
 
Top