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scratch stock - in the rough

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condeesteso

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Bugbear's right - tried drawing an edge and apart from the difficulty of scale I am unconvinced. The persuit is the making of a perfectly sharp edge with a 90 degree bevel. So back to the files and honing, I'm sure that is the correct way. I need to find ever finer materials to finish - hone.
 

xy mosian

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On the sides I ended up with very fine, of course I've forgotten the grade just now, wet and dry. On the edge I tried the wet and dry but found that I lost the 'flat', that is I lost the square corner, so I returned to a well worn oil slip stone.

HTH xy.
 

jimi43

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I'm not entirely convinced that honing is necessary Douglas.

I have a feeling that this material acts more like a scraper and the key to a sharp edge is a perfect right angle filed so a small burr is evident on the edge. It's just a thought....I am new to these things.

Jim
 

bugbear

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jimi43":3bd98bcf said:
I'm not entirely convinced that honing is necessary Douglas.

I have a feeling that this material acts more like a scraper and the key to a sharp edge is a perfect right angle filed so a small burr is evident on the edge. It's just a thought....I am new to these things.

Jim
In my testing, I found a nicely honed edge cut better, and lasted longer, than an edge that was only filed.

BugBear
 

condeesteso

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I accept well-filed should be good, but will certainly have something of a rough edge. It seems logical to me to aim for a chisel-edge, but 90 degrees - i.e. honed, polished etc. But I'll find some more time to try making a few new cutters - plus the heat treating, then final hone. Report back then. AND, the Stubbs just arrived (the larger set, awaiting the needles). Wow, they are good. I think they cost £40 for about 20-odd files and the quality is really impressive. What does everyone do re handles, I do not fancy turning up 20-odd handles - do you make a few and interchange them?? If so, any tricks about getting them to fit well but change easily?
 

jimi43

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Hi Douglas...

I think I have a spare needle file handle you can have next time I see you. I will go dig in the cave.

Anyone else thinking of getting any can they let me know...apparently I have three round ones waiting for me for free...seems there can be some commission if you ask! :mrgreen: :wink:

Jim
 

bugbear

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condeesteso":1nytyig3 said:
I accept well-filed should be good, but will certainly have something of a rough edge. It seems logical to me to aim for a chisel-edge, but 90 degrees - i.e. honed, polished etc. But I'll find some more time to try making a few new cutters - plus the heat treating, then final hone. Report back then. AND, the Stubbs just arrived (the larger set, awaiting the needles). Wow, they are good. I think they cost £40 for about 20-odd files and the quality is really impressive. What does everyone do re handles, I do not fancy turning up 20-odd handles - do you make a few and interchange them?? If so, any tricks about getting them to fit well but change easily?
You can buy handles with collets for the purpose.

Or you could use a pin vise.

BugBear
 

condeesteso

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Ah yes... got badly side-tracked by the ash 'mountain' that needed prepping. Made another 'Wickes' during the interlude, see below. Came out left-handed - weird that :shock:
I need to make a couple of more blades and heat treat them. I know I have to hone them mirror-like (you are representing just filing). I still have to get a good result across grain forming a smallish bead. It can be done, but I haven't managed to my satisfaction yet. I'm looking for an actual piece I can use this on - maybe a pair of mirrors coming up. But I am convinced it is now a part of the tool arsenal, t be used with 'confidence' - and it is so versatile and quick.
During the second interlude, I cleaned an old drill that was lying in the retired tools box - my very first hand drill it was. Nothing at all to do with this but nowhere else to put it!
then I discovered the chuck won't take my chatter-free countersinks... doh!!

p.s. when you say 'out of the fire' I think you mean 'chip pan'?
 

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jimi43

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Hi Douglas....

Nice one mate! What is the wood for the block? Is it your maple again? 8)

Did you see the video? Note how the burr is removed but the 90 degrees seems to be critical.

I have some of those machine files if you want to try them...they are spiral ground...rather interesting things if you haven't used/seen them before...though I may be teaching a grandmother...... :wink:

Yes..out of the chip pan is what I meant! :mrgreen:

Re the drill...have a look at my collection of hand drills next time you are over and if one of the chuck suits your chatter free countersinks it's yours.

Jim
 

condeesteso

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yes Jim - maple has some heartwood through it, and wenge. Brass pressure strip and fence faces, 2 brass lock screws for the blade (brass nuts inset out of view). Works fine, honest... it's just I have become attached to the very basic Wickes V1. It's all about the blades from now on (that may be my single greatest 'truism' in the world of working wood, ever maybe!). You will be trying the V2 v soon anyway.

p.s. yes, saw the video. V good... almost perfect But he didn't hone the finished edge !! Oh well, time will tell :)
 

condeesteso

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excellent piece. I'm still working with mine, and resolved honing, and hardening (no annealing). Re the stock I am planning to open slightly the clearance in the fence where the blade recesses, as swarf gets clogged in the tight gap. had mine working very well yesterday on some satin walnut. Need to work up to some more ambitious profiles next. End grain is still tricky but a hard sharp blade is an essential starting point I think, along with the shellac trick. Basically, brilliant tools!!
 
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