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saws, chisels, brands and confusion!

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ByronBlack

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Ok, i'm nearly done with my tool-shopping. Thanks to the excellent advice on this forum, I have purchased a Jet 14" bandsaw (love it), Hitachi C/S, Triton workstation and various other bits.

The only thing left for me to get (before I go to bruce luckhursts course - will probably want to buy extra stuff afterwards.) is a set of chisels for parring and mortising and some saws to cut tenons and dovetails.

I have a budget of £200

What is the best that I can purchase for that? I already have a japanese ice-bear tenon-saw, but would like something better for dovetails, I was also looking at the Kirshen Chisel set from Axminster. As for saws I quite the look of either some of the japanese stuff or the Axminster Victor range.

Any advice would be greatly helpful as i'm a little confused as what to get, as I don't want to end up with cheap inferior tools and without being able to use them first I would really appreciate any of your insight.

One last thing, Are the Cosman or Charlesworth DVD's worth the money? Her-in-doors need some idea's for birthday presents.
 

jasonB

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Paring & Morticing really should be done with different chisels.

A Paring chisel has a long thin beveled blade and should only be used to pare timber, I have a Robert Sorby one which is loverly to use.

For morticing you could use dedicated mortice chisels or use beveled edge chisels which are more of an all round chisel. I use japanese chisels on the bench and stanleys on site as they don't chip so easily.

As for saws, some of the small backed japanese saws are very nice to use, I have several with different lengths of blade & tpi.

Have a look at Dick and Toolbay for japanese tools.

May also be worth contacting the tutor to see if he reccommends any specific tools.

Jason
 

wizer

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FWIW the Kirschen Chisels are on my birthday list after being recomended here. fingers crossed for this Friday!! :wink:
 

ByronBlack

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jasonB":2rjiuxnp said:
Paring & Morticing really should be done with different chisels.

A Paring chisel has a long thin beveled blade and should only be used to pare timber, I have a Robert Sorby one which is loverly to use.

For morticing you could use dedicated mortice chisels or use beveled edge chisels which are more of an all round chisel. I use japanese chisels on the bench and stanleys on site as they don't chip so easily.

Jason
Thanks for the info Jason, do I assume correctly that the kirshen 1101's being bevel edged aren't as good for moticing as a dedicated mortice chisel, what would the difference be?

Looking at axminster (my favourite store if you havn't already noticed :) ) they do these from Crown http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=19719 Do you think these would be worth purchasing instead of the Kirshen box-set?

I apologise for so many newbie questions!
 

jasonB

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Given your budget I would go with a set of the 1101s or a set of Japanese chisels. Add to this a 3/4" paring chisel then if you find the need buy martice chisels as req'd.

Don't forget something to hit them with, I like the jap 325g hammer on Dick's site but a wooden mallet is probably better for the Kirschens.

Wait until later when the real handtool fetishists are back out of their workshops :lol:

Jason
 

wizer

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jasonB":3l1klfq8 said:
Wait until later when the real handtool fetishists are back out of their workshops :lol:
:lol:
 
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