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GEPPETTO

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hi all,
I am interesting to buy an hand saw to make dovetail junctions.
Can anyone explain me what is the main difference between a dovetail and a gent saw?

And what do you think about these:


Dovetail Saw made by Thomas Flinn
handle in two colours of beech, with fine workmanship. This saw has an extraordinarily good feel in the hand. Teeth ratio 1.25mm/22 TPI, depth of cut 58mm. Teeth are filed for crosscut and ripcut! Enlargement

Blade length: 200 mm
Order nr. 303003
Price € 81.00


Brass Back Tenon Saw made by Thomas Flinn
construction as dovetail saw, but longer with bigger teeth. Teeth ratio 2mm/13 TPI, depth of cut 78mm. Teeth are filed for crosscut and ripcut! Enlargement

Blade length: 300 mm
Order nr. 303005
Price € 81.00


Gent's Saw made by Thomas Flinn
Rosewood handle, the saw for all very fine tasks.
Depth of cut: 46 mm/1-13/16 in.
Teeth ratio: 1,2 mm/21 TPI
Blade length: 200 mm
Order nr. 303009
Price € 21.90

Thanks a lot in advance to anyone who will answer to my questions
 

Alf

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Geppetto":2ecifujn said:
Can anyone explain me what is the main difference between a dovetail and a gent saw?
The handles. A Gent's Saw has a turned handle. Usually they have much finer teeth too, but modern manufactures don't always stick to tradional ways, so you can't necessarily rely on that.

Geppetto":2ecifujn said:
This saw has an extraordinarily good feel in the hand
Sounds like you've found a favourite - go for it! :D Oh, and I expect they're filed rip or crosscut, in which case you'll want rip for dovetails. If you want to use it for more all round work then you might be better off getting a crosscut though, which will do everything.

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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I own both the Flinn gent's saw and the L-N dovetail saw. I may be a fool, but I reach for the gent's saw. The teeth are finer, the kerf is finer, the saw tracks more reliably. While crosscut/rip matters little in my opinion on saws with fine teeth I do find the the gent's saw cuts slightly (emphasis on slightly) more slowly. This is an advantage as far as I'm concerned.

Rest assured that a quality gent's saw (X-cut teeth and all) will cut perfectly fine dovetails. The Flinn saw is easier on your wallet as well.
 

Adam

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Welcome to the forum cstanford :D

Adam
 

Alf

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Welcome to the forum.

cstanford":3m9cgh4n said:
Rest assured that a quality gent's saw (X-cut teeth and all) will cut perfectly fine dovetails. The Flinn saw is easier on your wallet as well.
True, but sometimes the lack of physical or visual orientation that you get with a round handle can be a drawback. I can't use a gent's saw fo DTs for exactly that reason, but it's definitely a matter of taste. Of course if it's an issue you could always replace the round handle with a pistol grip style of your choice, so save money and end up with a customised handle. So many options, so little time. :)

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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I know some who prefer the gent's saw to the open handled dovetail saw. Ususally the index finger is laid on top of or beside the brass back to aid in orienting the saw. I use an 8" Disston #4 (closed handle, 14 tpi, filed rip) most of the time but I'm making some small drawers with thin stock and my Crown gent's saw (17tpi filed rip) is working well on them.
 
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Anonymous

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Alf":1d7sggx7 said:
Of course if it's an issue you could always replace the round handle with a pistol grip style of your choice
Alf,

As I saw in your reply to my dovetail saw query you've changed saw handles before. I'd like to replace the round handle on a gents saw to a pistol grip type, how would you recommend going about it? What, if anything, would you do differently a second time?

I don't know why I've never thought of that before, but then (insert witty remark about my intelligence). :roll:

Cheers

Regan
 

Alf

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Regan":neoe3kts said:
What, if anything, would you do differently a second time?
That's easy; I'd have waited for Lief Hanson to do it first so I could follow his instructions! :lol: He's got some great info here which I can't top. If you want a few sources for handle designs then this current thread is well worth a look. The key thing not to overlook is the angle the handle meets the blade at; I blew this hopelessly and it really limits my depth of cut unnecessarily. Oh, and a tip Lief doesn't seem to have needed, but I certainly did; to get the kerf for the blade straight and centralised, clamp the blade you're going to cut it with onto a flat surface, on a spacer block that'll locate the cut exactly in the centre of the handle's thickness. Then bring the blank to the blade, with it laid flat on the surface, and work it side to side to make the cut. It should end up perfectly straight and central. (And that explanation may be a load of garbage, so if a pic would be helpful, yell. :oops: )

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Thanks Alf!

I think I follow what you're saying, but just to make it foolproof could you post a picture?

I think I have the next few weekends lined up now :D

Regan
 

Alf

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Regan":20e0qm97 said:
I think I follow what you're saying, but just to make it foolproof could you post a picture?
Surely, but it'll have to wait 'til tommorow unless a miracle of spare time appears from nowhere today. :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 

Alf

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Well I nearly managed to forget :oops: , but here we are. Although if they actually help...?


Clamps holding the saw down to the spacer block, piece with the up/down arrow is the stand-in handle blank. The arrows indicate the movement (d'oh).


Bit of a close up to see the relation of spacer, saw and blank to each other. This was just scraps straight from the cut offs box, so not necessarily perfectly centred.

Hope that's slightly clearer than mud. :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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That's perfect Alf. Its pretty well what I thought you meant, but seeing it confirmed it.

I'll be sure and post the result, although it may take a while.
 
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