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Rutland chuck

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timber

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I have a Rutlands chuck. It's o.k.
However I wanted to hold a small bowl by it's top so that I could finish the base. The jaws I chose are the flat plate ones with the small pegs that came with it. The pegs are straight sided about 3/4 inch long. I just cannot see how they can hold my bowl securely without using the tail stock.
Has anyone found a way round this problem. and have found a use for it.
 

Lignafera

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I would use the tailstock centre with light pressure and turn the base as close to the centre as you can. Then remove the bowl and use a flat chisel to remove the waste piece.
 

timber

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I would use the tailstock centre with light pressure and turn the base as close to the centre as you can. Then remove the bowl and use a flat chisel to remove the waste piece.
Thanks for the quick reply .I wondered if anyone had made better pins Like ones with a taper
 

Terry - Somerset

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It may be better to consider softer rubber or plastic pins - this is likely to grip with more friction by deforming slightly as the chuck is tightened.

Otherwise as already suggested, use the tail stock to lightly hold the bowl in place
 

Bob Chapman

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Put the bowl in place with the pins you have and then wrap masking tape around both the bowl and the chuck except for the bit you need to turn (presumably the foot). Bring up the tailstock and remove the bulk of the waste. Finally remove the tailstock and turn away the little bit you left taking light cuts because you are relying on the pins/tape combo to hold it in place.
 

JBaz

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I used ordinary rubber feet screwed in upside down.
IMG_5304.JPG

I also use a cone of softwood mounted on a live centre to keep light pressure on the piece for as long as I can.
IMG_5306.JPG

Hope this helps.

John
 

MarkDennehy

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I have those cole jaws timber, but the buttons mine came with have a slight taper to them. I'm not the greatest fan of them to be honest, I'm starting to think that given that I almost always have the tailstock up anyway, I might just buy another faceplate ring when they're back in stock and make one of the pushplates Colwin Way uses all the time (just a flat circle of ply or MDF with some router matting on it, and you use it like it was a jam chuck and pin the bowl to it by the tailstock). Give the amount of time it takes to set up the cole jaws because every bowl I make seems to not fit the setup from the last bowl, it seems like a better option.

And the last nubbin of wood left on the bottom of the bowl then can be either pared away with a sharp chisel or sanded off using a sanding disk. I don't have room for a separate disk sander so I stole a Way idea again: faceplate ring, flat circle of MDF, velcro tape, velcro backed sandpaper and a flat-topped platform in the banjo.

 

MarkDennehy

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Oh, and I'm currently in awe at the capabilities of hot melt glue blocks. I honestly thought they'd be a youtuber's gimmick, but the things have some serious holding capacity. Used one to finish the bottom of a platter that was the maximum size my lathe could take:





Just a scrap bit of wood faced off in the chuck and given a small dish across the face, press the piece against it with the tailstock, apply hot melt glue around the join (I've done hot melt on the face as well but it doesn't seem to be needed), let it cool fully until it goes back to opaque, then turn carefully. A little IPA on the glue once you're done and it comes off without damaging the surface.
 

timber

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Oh, and I'm currently in awe at the capabilities of hot melt glue blocks. I honestly thought they'd be a youtuber's gimmick, but the things have some serious holding capacity. Used one to finish the bottom of a platter that was the maximum size my lathe could take:





Just a scrap bit of wood faced off in the chuck and given a small dish across the face, press the piece against it with the tailstock, apply hot melt glue around the join (I've done hot melt on the face as well but it doesn't seem to be needed), let it cool fully until it goes back to opaque, then turn carefully. A little IPA on the glue once you're done and it comes off without damaging the surface.
Mark
Thanks for the reply.
We seem to have the same lathe, I have only just bought mine, Have only used it to turn the inside of some candle sticks. and the small bowl that I am working on. I have had many lathes but never really got into bowl turning. I find my Legacy Mill/Lathe much more satisfying. It can do so much more than turning spindles.It is the Revo model Basically a router on rails.I have just made three small boxes (approx 5x3 by 2 high ) out of some Yew. 1/4 inch boards planed and box jointed on the Revo Thanks to all who replied
Timber
 
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