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Rowan / mountain ash

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srs

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I got to take down a Rowan in the mother in-laws garden in the next month or so (when the sap has dropped..... the trees not hers) and was wondering if its would be any good for turning etc its a good straight tree with a trunk of about 5ft tall and 10"-12" wide. Otherwise it will go on the ever increasing firewood pile
 
A

Anonymous

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Turns brilliantly. =D>
Uses past & present: Dense hard pale brown wood. Uses of wood - Turnery and carving and good firewood. Used to make bows in middleages. Formerly used for tool handles, mallet heads, bowls and platters.

Also - and more importantly - it's free. Any chance you could be coming near Warwickshire after it's been felled? :roll:
 

srs

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Thanks for the info, I shall see what I can do about bringing some up to the arctic wastelands known as warwickshire once its down and into lumps.

I take it I just make it into lumps and wax the end grain and store (If anyone can recommend a good website in regard of processing the wood or care to enlighten me further in the arts I would be interested)

Cheers
Simon
 

trevtheturner

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Hi Simon,

The longer the lengths you can keep it in, the better. Then it is important to seal any end grain as soon as possible. If wax is used, it needs to be hot wax, so it is not the most convenient of jobs to do. However, there are easy, and just as effective, alternatives. I use undiluted PVA, brushing it on liberally with a stiff brush, making sure that I have fully covered any end grain (including and points where side branches might have been cut off). Equally, you could use any left over paint - either gloss or emulsion will do. Store it out of rain and sunlight to dry it - although you might want to turn some of it wet.

Depending on how you you think you will want to use the wood, to release some of the stresses that will be inherent in the wood (which in themselves can lead to checks (splits)) and to assist drying, you could cut the wood lenthways through the pith before storing.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Trev.
 
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