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Rounded bevel sharpening got even simpler.

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Jacob

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Sharpening seems to have got much simpler since I bought a Sorby Pro edge. NB, don't buy one - an ordinary belt sander is much more useful.
What I find myself doing is backing off the bevel frequently on 120 grit on the pro edge, then fine honing the bevel (rounding under etc) on just one fine oil stone, and that's it. One grit on a machine, one grit on an oil stone.
The freehand bit is quicker than changing a belt and anyway you still have to take off the wire edge face down on a stone. So the versatility of the Proedge is a bit redundant, ordinary belt sander just as good. For all straight edges at least. It does run cool with coarse grits true (but not with fine grits).
Have been right around the houses and now back to the system I was using nearly 50 years ago! So why did I abandon it back then? Answer- it was the seductive call of the Stanley jig! It hasn't half wasted a lot of my time over the years. Luckily I didn't get drawn in to scary sharp and all that stuff with sand paper. :roll:
So why now? Mainly because the slow inefficient sharpening I used to do with jigs etc didn't really matter when I was just doing softwood joinery but I'm now trying to do other things and a nifty, effective and efficient sharpening system is much more necessary.
 

Jacob

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Alan Jones":3k9ou0p1 said:
So why did you buy a pro-edge if a belt sander is as good :?
I keep trying things out and selling them on if I don't like them. Most of the good modern kit you just about get your money back if it is still in close to new condition.
But the Pro-edge is handy - mainly because it stays on a work top, is easy to set and change belts and is always available for the one purpose, whereas a belt sander gets used and set up for other purposes (e.g. sanding!). So I'll keep the proedge I think.
The Bosch belt sander is good for sharpening as it sits upside down on the bench perfectly well, due to it's box shape.
 

bugbear

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Jacob":1x62stah said:
I keep trying things out and selling them on if I don't like them.
Borrowing from friends is cheaper and more sociable :D

Oh - and welcome to double bevel sharpening, with grinding bevel (worked coarse) and honing bevel (worked fine)...

BugBear
 

TobyB

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It may not suit all of you - but I've been delighted by the recent "Trizact" belts ... they run really cool in both fine sharpening and coarse (re-)shaping modes ... bought some AI unhandled big scrapers at the Harrogate show and the 600 belt quickly got me the shape/radii I wanted without bluing the steel, and then a finer edge with the 3000 belt ... the latter is just brilliant for the regular "quick touch-up" you do when making a bowl or whatever (sometimes just flicked by hand rather than using the motor) ... a polished-smooth edge far sharper than anything I've ever got with various colours of wheel or belt I'd used before (my own, or in the case of grinder wheels, other people's too).

Not cheap ... but I've been delighted by the results I've achieved on everything from coarse re-fashioning of abused or newly-purchased tools to fine-sharpening of turning-tools and kitchen knives. I've used scarey-sharp on wide plane blades, and a honing cotton-pad wheel with green grinding paste for my carving chisels/gouges ... but the Pro-Edge does the majority of my sharpening ...
 

Jacob

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bugbear":1vg8v8oi said:
Jacob":1vg8v8oi said:
I keep trying things out and selling them on if I don't like them.
Borrowing from friends is cheaper and more sociable :D

Oh - and welcome to double bevel sharpening, with grinding bevel (worked coarse) and honing bevel (worked fine)...

BugBear
:?:
I've been using a double sided stone, coarse and fine , from day 1. Pay attention BB!
If you don't have a tool rest set up it's perfectly easy to freehand on a belt sander (inc the Pro edge) and a rounded (dipped) bevel makes some sense as you distribute the friction and hence the tendency to over heat.
Still a single freehand (rounded) bevel on smaller chisels and thin plane blades - it's just so much quicker!

Re toby above, yes the proedge is good but I found the fine trizact does easily over heat the edge. Or maybe it's did (ditto) now I know how it works.
 
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