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Roughing gouge profile

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chrisbaker42

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I just bought a very nice Sorby 19mm roughing gouge for £10 on ebay, when it arrived I was amazed to find a really long fingernail grind on it, surely the norm would be a straight grind. Apart from the grind it had hardly been used so still a good buy even though I lost well over an inch in length squaring it off again.
 

loz

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Sounds like a continental gouge rather than a rouging out gouge
 

jumps

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does sound more like the 839H than the 843H

Sorby do grind the roughing gouge wings back ever so slightly to keep the top corners clear but the underlying grind is normal

there should be a number on the steel .... what was it?
 

chrisbaker42

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Only lettering on the steel HSS Robert Sorby Sheffield England 19mm 3/4"

It is definitely a roughing gouge and not a continental spindle gouge which can easily be seen by the radius of the forged bar used.
It is not the original grind being very concave and having a couple of different facets from at least a couple of regrinds I said it was a used gouge and this is what the previous owner had done with the wings being one and a half inches in length. My question really is why would anyone do this?
 

Paul Hannaby

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Perhaps the previous owner used it just like a continental gouge and didn't see the benefits of the wings as used on a roughing gouge?
 

Jacob

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chrisbaker42":1aya221q said:
.... My question really is why would anyone do this?
He probably asked himself the same question!
But did you try it out at all?
My inclination with things like that is to leave them be, but have a go. Surely it'd rough-out OK? If not then with each sharpening you could take it towards you preferred shape. Or stick with it if it works.
 

Richard Findley

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Hi Chris

Ideally a roughing gouge should have a single bevel of around 30 - 50 degrees (mine is about 35deg) and ground straight across, this allows you to maximise it in use. By rolling the tool over you can use the wings to cut up to details and because the grind is even all around, you can use it in several positions before re-sharpening is required.

On a related note, I have seen a lot of SRGs that have a rather strange shaped flute which doesn't really allow a nice even grind to be produced, my Ashley Isles gouge is a perfect(?) semi-circular curve which rolls and grinds perfect every time. I would highly recommend it.

HTH

Richard
 

chrisbaker42

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At the moment I have all my gouges at 45 degrees but now I have invested in some nice jigs I am going to experiment as sometimes the 45 degrees is a bit harsh.
 
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