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Rough edges

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Duiker

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On two bowls I have produced recently there are rough sides and smooth sides. The rough sides seem to coincide with the grain ends.
I tried to sand them out (turning in both directions) without success.

What did I do wrong? How can you get rid of it? Is it me or just the wood I used?
 
G

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I too suffered from grain end, the best solution I found was to use sanding sealer before sanding, a second application may be needed in some cases
Sharp tools help also but sometimes I have to resort to the sealer
 

Taffy Turner

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Mick,

The problem you describe is the perennial one suffered by bowl turners. The rough patches you describe are, as you correctly surmised, caused by the end grain. This problem is highly dependent on what wood you are turning. Generally the harder woods are less of a problem. The ones I always have problems with are Yew and Spalted Beech.

There are a couple of ways around it. It pays to freshly sharpen your gouge before taking the finishing cut, and make this cut as fine as possible. Sometimes a light cut with a freshly ground scraper can work, but sometimes it makes the problem worse - again it depends on the species of wood.

As Jaymar says, using sanding sealer before sanding can help, or even using it before taking the finishing cuts can help as well (works well for Spalted Beech this one).

At the end of the day, a lot of it is down to practice. As your turning technique improves (make sure that bevel is rubbing all the time), you will find that this problem gradually becomes less of an issue.

Regards

Gary
 

Duiker

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Thanks guys,

It was indeed a Yew bowl that was by far the worst. I did try sanding sealer but only afterwards. I'll mount it again and give it another go with "the final cut" as you say.

This brings me to another question....

So far I seem unable to use a gouge without destroying the peice. I have only managed to turn decent bowls using scrapers. This works fine but takes a lifetime to cut enough wood out of the bowl. The one gouge I did manage to use was one the old man had ground out for himself (left handed).

I'll post a new thread as I guess this might generate a few replies and help some others too?
 

Taffy Turner

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Mick,

Yew is a b*gg*r of a wood to scrape - it tears up horribly on the end grain.

Try giving it a few coats of sanding sealer, and then try a VERY light cut with a freshly ground scraper.

Good luck.

Gary
 

Argee

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If you have a lathe that has a reverse option, try very lightly scraping in reverse just prior to sanding - and I mean VERY lightly! Sometimes you won't notice a difference, but I've found it to be effective more often than not.

Ray.
 

Duiker

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Hi Guys,

As suggested I took the worst bowl and mounted it once again. After an initial sanding to remove all polish and wax I gave the thing a darn good soaking in sanding sealer. I then took a shaving off and hey presto, all gone! :lol:
I couldnt believe the difference! All but a real small patch has gone and now its waxed again it looks the absolute dogs danglies! I'm well chuffed and once again must thank you all for your advice. Where would I be without you all!

Cheers,

Mick
 
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