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Rotten Chest of Drawers

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Mark A

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My mum bought a chester draws from ebay, but only when I turned it on it's side to sand I noticed there's a bit of rot. There are no woodworm holes.

Is this wet rot? I plan to cut it out, treat the area then replace a bit of scrap. Would wood hardener do it, or would I need something else?

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Thanks,
Mark
 

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Jacob

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Can you see it when it's standing upright as per normal use? If not, then just ignore it, unless it's coming apart.
It's dificult to fit new stuff to rotten wood so if you do have to repair it it might be a good idea to make a discrete plinth for it, or sledge feet which it can stand on and have the bottom timbers held together a bit.
 

CHJ

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Have you considered just putting a new plinth on? sometimes replace is quicker and easier than repair.
 

Mark A

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I think I do have to fix the rot because it's coming apart, though I don't have to touch the plinth as the rot is hidden behind it.

What do you suggest I use to treat the area with after I cut out the rotten wood?

Cheers,
Mark
 

Jacob

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mark aspin":2rmmjd4y said:
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What do you suggest I use to treat the area with after I cut out the rotten wood?

Cheers,
Mark
Nothing needed if it is going to be kept in a dry environment.
 

misterfish

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I'd leave well alone - from what I can see the whole thing looks fine. For your own peace of mind, however, you could use a hardener and filler, but unless it is coming apart it should be fine.

This is an old piece of furniture and part of the charm is its age. patina and idiosyncrasies.

Why are you sanding it? I assume to refinish it. If you are intending to use a clear finish be careful not to leave it patchy by uneven removal of its patina.

Misterfish
 

Jacob

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Sand it? I didn't notice that! Agree, about the worst thing you can do to a bit of old furniture - don't do it!
 

Mark A

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Jacob":3swz17s8 said:
Sand it? I didn't notice that! Agree, about the worst thing you can do to a bit of old furniture - don't do it!
Naa... it's not that old! It was finished in an ugly honey-coloured varnish which had to go.
 
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