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Rooting hormone poweder

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sammy.se

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Hi
Can anyone recommend a potent, effective rooting hormone powder?

I've searched online and there are some that call themselves 'natural' and don't call themselves hormones, and others with mixed reviews that call themselves hormones.

It's just for decorative plants, so doesn't need to be organic or food safe, just needs to work.

Cheers!

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sammy.se

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I plan on cutting offshoots from my oleander plants and using the rooting hormone on them


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sammy.se

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Phil Pascoe":1a34dydu said:
Elf'n safety - there's no hormones in them any more.
Ah really?? No wonder there's so much confusing writing/claims on the boxes.

Any particular brands anyone on here can recommend from experience?

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Tris

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Soluble aspirin as a dip, it's just like salicylic acid which is the main ingredient in most rooting powders. Otherwise soak willow bark overnight and use the water as a dip. Iirc oleander like a bit of warmth from below and gritty medium.
 

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Oleander is almost indestructible - should take without too much problem, with or without hormones.

I cut mine a bit like rose cuttings, and they took without trouble - I would think too much water would be the only real problem for them - they can tolerate complete absence of water for months, but obviously you want to keep the cuttings damp while they start to sprout.

This is something like the way I did it, except I didn't put them in water and wait for roots - I just shoved them in a pot and crossed fingers...https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-olea ... 20981.html
 

sammy.se

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Thanks all.
I have general purpose compost and sand. Will that be ok?

Also, should I cut the the branches/offshoots at a ~45 degree angle, or at right angles?

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sammy.se":10u4c0xo said:
Thanks all.
I have general purpose compost and sand. Will that be ok?

Also, should I cut the the branches/offshoots at a ~45 degree angle, or at right angles?

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Oliander is native to South Africa, I believe - it lives in deserts, so drainage is vital. Too much good soil makes for too much growth and no flowers - great for the first couple of years, but after that no nitrogen!

As I understand it, you cut the top of the cutting @ 45°, but the bottom flat, purely so you know which way is up when you come to plant them. At least that goes for roses, but I do everything like that to save on making all my plants antipodean. I do a lot of rose cuttings by just shoving a stick in the ground - they seem to quite like the abuse.
 

Tris

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Compost and sharp sand mixed 50:50 will suit them well. Cut tips about 4 inches long, straight across and just below a leaf node. Take off all but the top two leaves and push the cuttings into the compost to about 2/3rds their length. Water well then put the pot in a heated propagator if you have one in a greenhouse, or pop a clear poly bag over the pot and place it on a warm windowsill.
Hope that helps
Tris

Edit to add, there's no harm in cutting at 45 degrees at the bottom, indeed it's essential for hardwood cuttings when there's no leaves for the reasons TN mentioned
 

sammy.se

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Trainee neophyte":3ssaa9un said:
As I understand it, you cut the top of the cutting @ 45°, but the bottom flat, purely so you know which way is up when you come to plant them. At least that goes for roses, but I do everything like that to save on making all my plants antipodean. I do a lot of rose cuttings by just shoving a stick in the ground - they seem to quite like the abuse.
Thanks! I will give this a go.

Trainee neophyte":3ssaa9un said:
Oliander is native to South Africa, I believe - it lives in deserts, so drainage is vital. Too much good soil makes for too much growth and no flowers - great for the first couple of years, but after that no nitrogen!
Yes! This is what I have - lots of great growth but very little flowers. Does that mean I need to add nitrogen to the soil?
As you can tell, I'm a total beginner at gardening, but keen to learn.
 

sammy.se

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Tris":15rs9oco said:
Compost and sharp sand mixed 50:50 will suit them well. Cut tips about 4 inches long, straight across and just below a leaf node. Take off all but the top two leaves and push the cuttings into the compost to about 2/3rds their length. Water well then put the pot in a heated propagator if you have one in a greenhouse, or pop a clear poly bag over the pot and place it on a warm windowsill.
Hope that helps
Tris
Great, thank you Tris! very helpful
I will use a poly bag - I don't have a green house - do you mean a warm window sill indoors, or can I leave it in a sunny place in the garden?
 

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sammy.se":1rbajg1u said:
]

Yes! This is what I have - lots of great growth but very little flowers. Does that mean I need to add nitrogen to the soil?
As you can tell, I'm a total beginner at gardening, but keen to learn.
Oleander (sp?) is sneaky - it's flowering is dependent on sunshine levels. When the flowers start, and for how long it flowers, depends on how many hours sunlight it gets in the spring, so it needs wheeling out if the greenhouse at every opportunity. How many flowers you get depends on your fertilizer ratio - I'm not the person to ask as we treat them as weeds - they get completely ignored and abused - used as hedging plants or anywhere you want flowers with zero maintenance and never watering. I would guess less nitrogen and more phosphorus and potassium if it's in a pot. Your plant looks quite young, so it may come into its own later - it will get to the size of a small tree if you let it.

(If that is an olive in the pot next to the oleander, that needs 3:1:2 NPK ratio, and not much of it. You could get away with just giving it nitrogen, or good compost.)
 

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sammy.se":1iatwgqp said:
Phil Pascoe":1iatwgqp said:
Elf'n safety - there's no hormones in them any more.
Ah really?? No wonder there's so much confusing writing/claims on the boxes.

Any particular brands anyone on here can recommend from experience?

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I did a trial last year with dozens of plant cuttings, half with “natural” rooting powders, and half with nothing added. The powders made no difference at all to rooting or subsequent growth. I won’t use them again.
 

Tris

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sammy.se":32guw0ki said:
Tris":32guw0ki said:
Compost and sharp sand mixed 50:50 will suit them well. Cut tips about 4 inches long, straight across and just below a leaf node. Take off all but the top two leaves and push the cuttings into the compost to about 2/3rds their length. Water well then put the pot in a heated propagator if you have one in a greenhouse, or pop a clear poly bag over the pot and place it on a warm windowsill.
Hope that helps
Tris
Great, thank you Tris! very helpful
I will use a poly bag - I don't have a green house - do you mean a warm window sill indoors, or can I leave it in a sunny place in the garden?
Best to keep them indoors at the moment, it's a bit early for what are essentially semi-ripe cuttings but well worth a try with a tender plant.
Try giving it tomato feed at half strength once a week to encourage flowering but stop once it's in flower.
I can't remember if it flowers on old wood or new, but either way the more sun it gets the better it will develop. Helps to ripen the wood, which is also why it is a good idea to stop feeding after flowering.
 

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Tbh I thought this was about Harry Potter. Only reason I clicked on it.
Bit disappointed tbh.
 

sammy.se

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Thanks for all the advice.

It is indeed an olive plant, doing well so far.



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sammy.se

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Phil Pascoe":2ylzjifn said:
Don't forget oleander is poisonous to animals and humans - a single leaf can kill a child.
Didn't know how poisonous these were. Most warnings I've seen are about skin irritation. Luckily no pets or small children here, but good to know - I may not make too many more of these, and try something else like camelia japonica.

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