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thetyreman

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There are only two red lights I cycle through. One in Bath and another in Wells. Both are fitted with sensors that are unable to detect a person on a carbon bike. As my route is inevitable on the normally stopped direction I have no option but to jump it. I’ve had nasty looks from pedestrians when I’ve done it. I have contacted both councils and neither will do anything about it.

that is understandable in that case, I do see a lot of unhelmeted cyclists though with no regard for safety of themselves or others, who definitely do it with no regard for any drivers, pedestrians or other cyclists.
 

Jameshow

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that is understandable in that case, I do see a lot of unhelmeted cyclists though with no regard for safety of themselves or others, who definitely do it with no regard for any drivers, pedestrians or other cyclists.
Do they not sense the thermal heat of your body???
 

GarF

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Debatable.

Statistically, mandatory helmets for car drivers would yield a greater reduction in head injuries, I am told.
 

TRITON

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When cycling in Europe, how do you tell a local cyclist from a tourist cycling ?.

Tourists are wearing helmets.

You see, cycling in itself isnt a dangerous undertaking. Its nothing like a motorbike where the speeds are high enough to cause severe impact damage for the most part, and while you can fall off and that does happen, its not a normal danger.
Cars dont have roll cages. Yes some do go on accidental 'offroad' adventures and flip in an accident. But, like cycling in general its not a common occurrence.

Cycling in offroad places, ie mountainbiking, then lids are pretty compulsory as there are trees and rocks and roots and the nature of it all is high speed in rough terrain, whereas cycling in general is smooth tarmac.
 
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MikeJhn

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It has become more common to see skiers wearing helmets, mostly due to out of control skiers hitting others, head butts hurt, the problem is most helmets sold for skiing cover the ears so hearing is impaired, unlike a cycle helmet, most have exposed areas around the ears enabling them to hear a shouted warning or in most case's the shouted abuse.
 

MikeJhn

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It has been reported in most cycling magazines that an often used mantra by motorist who have hit cyclist is "The where not wearing a helmet" as if a helmet is going to stop a car killing a human, just muddying the waters and trying for some kind of mitigation.
 

thetyreman

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if drivers who are protected by their car would need to wear helmets they'd make it law, there are no airbags or seatbelts on a bike.
 

TRITON

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It has been reported in most cycling magazines that an often used mantra by motorist who have hit cyclist is "The where not wearing a helmet" as if a helmet is going to stop a car killing a human, just muddying the waters and trying for some kind of mitigation.

No what the helmet does is when your body is crushed beyond repair, it means you are completely aware of it.
 

sploo

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You see, cycling in itself isnt a dangerous undertaking. Its nothing like a motorbike where the speeds are high enough to cause severe impact damage for the most part, and while you can fall off and that does happen, its not a normal danger.
Unsure... I mean, as a (now former) biker I shake my head at daft people riding a motorbike in t-shirt/shorts/trainers; but then I remember I've frequently ridden a bicycle at over 40mph (never quite cracked 50mph, but got close a few times).

I dread to think of what would be left if you came off a bicycle at that speed wearing lycra and thin shoes with cleats.

As for "cycling in general is smooth tarmac"; consider the height of your head from the ground when seated on a bicycle, then think about the likely head injury that would result simply from falling over (even stationary) where your head hits tarmac from that height. Add a forward motion of potentially tens of mph and... well... let's just say that I prefer to wear a lid even when road cycling.

giphy[1].gif
 

TRITON

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Well thats ok for me then because i rarely get over 12mph :LOL:
Plus I don't wear lycra apart from undershorts. Here in Scotland its multiple layers to guard against the cold.

Incidentally your pic is totally misleading. Even when head injuries have occurred, nobody has ever received such an injury their head explodes.
 

sploo

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Well thats ok for me then because i rarely get over 12mph :LOL:
Plus I don't wear lycra apart from undershorts. Here in Scotland its multiple layers to guard against the cold.

Incidentally your pic is totally misleading. Even when head injuries have occurred, nobody has ever received such an injury their head explodes.
I was hoping to find a slightly less dramatic watermelon drop, but that was the best of the bunch ;)

Being serious though; just falling (from average adult standing height) onto hard ground can cause significant head injuries, so a helmet is no bad idea even for casual cyclists.
 

Sandyn

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When you are cycling, If you rely on rules of the highway code to keep you safe, you'll get into trouble. Any cyclist is responsible for looking after themselves on the road. You have to obey the rules of the road, be respectful and thoughtful towards other good road users. You have to assume, every car is driven by someone who is blind. Every car is going to pull out in front of you. Every car door you pass is suddenly going to open. Every pedestrian or dog is going to do something totally unexpected at the very last moment. Whilst watching for that, you have to look out for 5" deep potholes and observe the rules of the road. I constantly change my riding position on the road to suit traffic and roads. I am very aware holding up car drivers and try to assist them to get past. Sometimes it's safe for them to pass close at low speed, when there are cars coming in the opposite direction, but it's under my control. Most car drivers are very appreciative and give thanks. You still get the idiots that fly past, too fast and too close, even when the other carriageway is clear. Changes to the highway code will make no difference to bad drivers, or bad cyclists.
I cycle quite a lot, typically 140 to 170 miles a week, but tend to keep off roads especially at commute times when people are in such a hurry. I can never understand why some drivers just have to get past a cyclist. how much time are they saving??

I do wear lycra (dark coloured) because it lowers wind resistance and it's warm. On some short Stravas I'm hitting 30+mph and I hate flapping clothing. I would estimate that 75% of women I pass whilst cycling have a quick swatch at my lunch pack. Some try to do it discretely, the head stays still, but the eyes move:ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO::eek:. Makes my laugh every time.
 

Jacob

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I cycle quite a lot, typically 140 to 170 miles a week, but tend to keep off roads especially at commute times when people are in such a hurry. I can never understand why some drivers just have to get past a cyclist. how much time are they saving??

I do wear lycra (dark coloured) because it lowers wind resistance and it's warm. .....
Busy main road sez bright yellow top. Essential really, it makes a big difference. Bright yellow jacket says police, ambulance, road worker and even a half asleep driver on autopilot will take more care.
I first noticed this years ago on the Kendal bypass, me in dark T shirt, on a sunny day with solid holiday traffic wizzing past. Felt too close and when a van wing mirror nearly touched my head I decided I'd had enough and put my yellow top on. The difference was immediately obvious and felt much safer. If it's hot just wear the top without the shirt.
 
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Sandyn

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Busy main road sez bright yellow top. Essential really, it makes a big difference
I always wear a high visibility jacket, but not a lycra one. As you say essential. I also have a bright flashing light on my helmet, but in some cases, people still don't see me. There's a blind spot in some drivers brains. They are looking for cars approaching and everything else is filtered out.
 

ian33a

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When you are cycling, If you rely on rules of the highway code to keep you safe, you'll get into trouble. Any cyclist is responsible for looking after themselves on the road. You have to obey the rules of the road, be respectful and thoughtful towards other good road users. You have to assume, every car is driven by someone who is blind. Every car is going to pull out in front of you. Every car door you pass is suddenly going to open. Every pedestrian or dog is going to do something totally unexpected at the very last moment. Whilst watching for that, you have to look out for 5" deep potholes and observe the rules of the road. I constantly change my riding position on the road to suit traffic and roads. I am very aware holding up car drivers and try to assist them to get past. Sometimes it's safe for them to pass close at low speed, when there are cars coming in the opposite direction, but it's under my control. Most car drivers are very appreciative and give thanks. You still get the idiots that fly past, too fast and too close, even when the other carriageway is clear. Changes to the highway code will make no difference to bad drivers, or bad cyclists.
I cycle quite a lot, typically 140 to 170 miles a week, but tend to keep off roads especially at commute times when people are in such a hurry. I can never understand why some drivers just have to get past a cyclist. how much time are they saving??

I do wear lycra (dark coloured) because it lowers wind resistance and it's warm. On some short Stravas I'm hitting 30+mph and I hate flapping clothing. I would estimate that 75% of women I pass whilst cycling have a quick swatch at my lunch pack. Some try to do it discretely, the head stays still, but the eyes move:ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO::eek:. Makes my laugh every time.

Most of what you have written describes my cycling. The only differences, in my case, is that I tend to wear lighter coloured lycra, at least on top as it's more visible in dull light conditions. I also always ride with flashing lights - not to aid my visibility on the road (I have non flashing mountain bike lights for that situation), simply so that others can see me. I also have rear radar so that I can detect traffic coming up behind me - often a difficult thing to do if there is a headwind.

On an average ride 80Km ride I'll probably encounter a couple of inconsiderate drivers. The other thousand or so are very considerate. I suspect that the average car driver will encounter the same sort of ratio of cyclists.
 

TRITON

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On an average ride 80Km ride I'll probably encounter a couple of inconsiderate drivers. The other thousand or so are very considerate. I suspect that the average car driver will encounter the same sort of ratio of cyclists.
I think that ratio is higher. Considerably higher.
If you've ever watched Cycling Micky's you tube channel there are a hell of a lot that speed through red lights, without slowing or showing any consideration.
 

ian33a

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I think that ratio is higher. Considerably higher.
If you've ever watched Cycling Micky's you tube channel there are a hell of a lot that speed through red lights, without slowing or showing any consideration.

Most of my riding is in smaller towns and in the countryside and outside of rush hour. Generally speaking, the road users there and then are a reasonable bunch.

Fair point though, in bigger towns and cities and during the rush hour, I expect that manners and keeping within the law go out of the window.

On the rare occasions that I'm out during rush hour I notice a definite trend toward highway anarchy.
 
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