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Review of Record TSPP250 Table Saw (Comparison with TS2000)

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NormanKing

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I recently sold my TS2000 and hadn’t initially intended to replace it, but in the end I did.

At this years Alexandra Palace woodworking exhibition I was very taken with the new Record TSPP250 and that’s the one I ended up buying.
The TS2000 is a great saw (but I wanted something a little bigger) and in this mini review my comparisons with the TS2000 is made because its the only other saw I can personally compare it to.



Assembly
This thing is HEAVY. Despite Record stating “Tail Lift Required” on the delivery note the courier obviously decided to save a few quid and put it on a transit van. Needless to say the poor driver and I couldn’t move the pallet so we had to unpack it and carry it into my workshop one piece at a time – good job I was there because my wife couldn’t have done it on her own.
Although I assembled the saw on my own another (strong) person would have been useful.

The steel base is assembled first by bolting its four sides together. At this point don’t forget to attach the sliding carriage mounting bracket to the back of the stand (Fig 1) before putting the saw on top of the stand otherwise you’ll have to disassemble it later when you discover your mistake.



Once the saw body is bolted to the top of the stand the main cast table is put on and bolted to the saw. The two cast iron table extensions are then bolted onto the side of the main table one at a time (see Fig 2) and aluminium fence runners are bolted to the front and the back.



The sliding assembly is quiet easy to fit. It is supplied with two cast iron jigs to correctly position the sliding carriage pole on the saw before everything is tightened up. Two 6mm holes need to be drilled in each end of the main table using pre-drilled holes in the carriage pole supports as guides (see Fig 3). Metal pins are then inserted into these holes so that the carriage never moves out of alignment (I guess they figure the three bolts in each support aren’t enough on their own). When this is done the iron jigs can be removed and discarded. The carriage support arm is then bolted onto the steel base and the carriage itself slides onto the pole. The rest of the carriage assembly is very straight forward.
Once fitted the sliding carriage is extremely ridged and MUCH stronger than the TS2000.



Quality of Finish
Very impressive all round. The quality of the cast iron is very impressive. It is extremely smooth and the joints between the main table and the two extensions are almost undetectable when you run your finger across them.
The paintwork is very good all round. Where plastic has been used (rise and fall wheel) it is easily comparable to the Scheppach so I don’t foresee any problems there.

Calibration
The fence alignment and saw blade 90/45 degree positions were spot on out of the box but the sliding table needed to be calibrated. This (unlike the TS2000) is very quick and easy to do within a few minutes.

In Use
The fence is brilliant. It slides very smoothly and locks solidly both back and front. Like the TS2000 it has a reversible sub-fence to allow really close cuts to the blade.
Also like the TS2000 the sliding carriage fence has an inner extension to expend its length to more than 2.2m (Fig 4). It can also be repositioned in seconds to fit onto the front or the back of the sliding table making it possible to use it with 8x4 Sheets (Unlike the TS2000 whose sliding carriage didn’t have enough travel).



The mitre gage is also very good. It is accurate and slides through the cast table effortlessly. It also includes a hold down clamp (Fig 5) which is used to hold stock when using the TSPP250 as a pull saw (maximum 220mm travel). Like Sheppach this mitre also goes to 60 degrees both ways.



Gripes
The sliding carriage fence lacks the accurate mitre of the TS2000. Instead you have to rely on a scale for angles. (Fig 6)
On delivery the riving knife stands proud of the blade making it useless for rebating, but a few minutes with a file to lengthen the slot easily solved that problem.



Summery
Overall I’m really pleased with the saw. Its motor is plenty powerful enough for the depth of cut and at just £799 for the complete package (including delivery if you can find a Record open day/exhibition) it really is excellent value for money and if you have the space for it you won’t regret your buy.
Sub Note
It’s worth noting that this saw is also being imported under the FOX brand. On the face of it the FOX looks cheaper then the Record but on closer inspection you only get one cast iron extension with it instead two and you don’t get a five year warranty so I think that tips the balance in favour of Record.
 

Philly

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Norman,
Thanks very much for your insights, it really is nice to hear from someone who actually owns a piece of gear as opposed to peoples impressions at shows.
Glad to hear you are pleased with your purchase, those cast iron bits really do add to rigidity and impart a feeling of quality.
I notice that, as well as the "Fox" branded one, SIP have released a similar looking saw bench, but without the pullsaw or sliding table. But if the sliding table is as good as you say, for the money it looks like a winner! :D
regards,
Philly
 

Chris Knight

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Norman,

A very nice review - thanks. I guess what would put me off the saw in my small shop is the apparent inability to quickly raise/lower the extension table. Otherwise it looks great and a very good price too.
 

DaveL

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Norman,

Good review, I am looking for a new more accurate saw to replace my B&Q one and this looks like it would fit the bill nicely.
Can I ask about blade changing, does the section of the table where the blade is unscrew for access?
 

NormanKing

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Waterhead37
This saw isn't suited to a small workshop. It's much to heavy to move about and the fixed iron tables are big, but that's also one of its strengths.

DaveL
Blade changing is like the TS2000. Remove the blade change cover, drop a screwdriver through a hole in the arbor to lock it and undo the blade nut with a spanner (supplied with saw).
 

devonwoody

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NormanKing":u3z6yzhn said:
I recently sold my TS2000 and hadn’t initially intended to replace it, but in the end I did.

At this years Alexandra Palace woodworking exhibition I was very taken with the new Record TSPP250 and that’s the one I ended up buying.
The TS2000 is a great saw (but I wanted something a little bigger) and in this mini review my comparisons with the TS2000 is made because its the only other saw I can personally compare it to.



Assembly
This thing is HEAVY. Despite Record stating “Tail Lift Required” on the delivery note the courier obviously decided to save a few quid and put it on a transit van. Needless to say the poor driver and I couldn’t move the pallet so we had to unpack it and carry it into my workshop one piece at a time – good job I was there because my wife couldn’t have done it on her own.
Although I assembled the saw on my own another (strong) person would have been useful.

The steel base is assembled first by bolting its four sides together. At this point don’t forget to attach the sliding carriage mounting bracket to the back of the stand (Fig 1) before putting the saw on top of the stand otherwise you’ll have to disassemble it later when you discover your mistake.



Once the saw body is bolted to the top of the stand the main cast table is put on and bolted to the saw. The two cast iron table extensions are then bolted onto the side of the main table one at a time (see Fig 2) and aluminium fence runners are bolted to the front and the back.



The sliding assembly is quiet easy to fit. It is supplied with two cast iron jigs to correctly position the sliding carriage pole on the saw before everything is tightened up. Two 6mm holes need to be drilled in each end of the main table using pre-drilled holes in the carriage pole supports as guides (see Fig 3). Metal pins are then inserted into these holes so that the carriage never moves out of alignment (I guess they figure the three bolts in each support aren’t enough on their own). When this is done the iron jigs can be removed and discarded. The carriage support arm is then bolted onto the steel base and the carriage itself slides onto the pole. The rest of the carriage assembly is very straight forward.
Once fitted the sliding carriage is extremely ridged and MUCH stronger than the TS2000.



Quality of Finish
Very impressive all round. The quality of the cast iron is very impressive. It is extremely smooth and the joints between the main table and the two extensions are almost undetectable when you run your finger across them.
The paintwork is very good all round. Where plastic has been used (rise and fall wheel) it is easily comparable to the Scheppach so I don’t foresee any problems there.

Calibration
The fence alignment and saw blade 90/45 degree positions were spot on out of the box but the sliding table needed to be calibrated. This (unlike the TS2000) is very quick and easy to do within a few minutes.

In Use
The fence is brilliant. It slides very smoothly and locks solidly both back and front. Like the TS2000 it has a reversible sub-fence to allow really close cuts to the blade.
Also like the TS2000 the sliding carriage fence has an inner extension to expend its length to more than 2.2m (Fig 4). It can also be repositioned in seconds to fit onto the front or the back of the sliding table making it possible to use it with 8x4 Sheets (Unlike the TS2000 whose sliding carriage didn’t have enough travel).



The mitre gage is also very good. It is accurate and slides through the cast table effortlessly. It also includes a hold down clamp (Fig 5) which is used to hold stock when using the TSPP250 as a pull saw (maximum 220mm travel). Like Sheppach this mitre also goes to 60 degrees both ways.



Gripes
The sliding carriage fence lacks the accurate mitre of the TS2000. Instead you have to rely on a scale for angles. (Fig 6)
On delivery the riving knife stands proud of the blade making it useless for rebating, but a few minutes with a file to lengthen the slot easily solved that problem.



Summery
Overall I’m really pleased with the saw. Its motor is plenty powerful enough for the depth of cut and at just £799 for the complete package (including delivery if you can find a Record open day/exhibition) it really is excellent value for money and if you have the space for it you won’t regret your buy.
Sub Note
It’s worth noting that this saw is also being imported under the FOX brand. On the face of it the FOX looks cheaper then the Record but on closer inspection you only get one cast iron extension with it instead two and you don’t get a five year warranty so I think that tips the balance in favour of Record.
Thanks for your review, I am awaiting delivery of this equipment and would like to hear if you have any further comments in addition to above .
 

johnb

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I've had a TSPP250 for about 9 months and have been very satisfied with it and the service from Record.

The only problem I've had was with the blade rise-and-fall. Mine used a plastic spiral thread component which eventually failed after about 6 months. Record replaced it very speedily with a redesigned metal component.

john
 

devonwoody

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johnb":3n4xzit2 said:
I've had a TSPP250 for about 9 months and have been very satisfied with it and the service from Record.

The only problem I've had was with the blade rise-and-fall. Mine used a plastic spiral thread component which eventually failed after about 6 months. Record replaced it very speedily with a redesigned metal component.

john
Thanks for your confidence boosting reply, I'm feeling a little sad about parting with my Triton setup after nearly 3 years.

Do you use the sliding carriage only for sheet material or do you have other uses for this carriage?
 

johnb

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Not sure I'm really the right person to reply. I'm left-handed so I probably use the sliding carriage for more general cross-cutting than I would if I was right-handed. Not helped by the position of the saw in the workshop which means there is more space on the side of the blade for longer lengths. I posiitoned it to be able to cut across 8x4 sheets on the sliding carriage and lengthways on the other side, when the double door is open.
 

devonwoody

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To johnb and other 250 users.

I hope with help to put together the tspp250 this evening but a little undecided which position to have the sliding carriage situated in the workshop.

Could anyone please tell me what are the dimensions from the right hand side of table (fence side) to the edge of the sliding carriage (not the full length of the long arm)

I have been told there is tobe a dedicated wheel kit from Record in September (around £80) and if this does come about it would help me in making a decision with above measurements in positioning the saw when setting up this evening.
 

johnb

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From the RH side (with the two extension tables attached on that side) to the blade is 100cm. From the blade to the LHS of the sliding table is 90cm. The rails for the fence guide extend about another 22cm from the RHS of the table extensions with the sliding carriage fitted so the overall width is about 212cm.
I'd be interested in the dedicated wheel set but wonder if it just for the version of the saw table without sliding carriage. The "long arm" for the sliding carriage has a "prop" which needs to rest on the floor to provide support.
 

johnb

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You should also be aware the guide which fits on the sliding table is 130cm in length from the blade when at 90 degrees to the blade and when closed and 225cm if fully extended - so you need to allow at least another 40 cm clearance to the left of the sliding carriage. See the last picture of the review.
 

NormanKing

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I'm glad you liked my review.

I've given my saw some stick for over a year now and I am still pleased with it.
My plastic rise and fall thingy also failed and Record replaced it with a metal one. They told me only the first batch went out with a plastic part, so all new tables since should be okay.
The only pain (like all cast tools) is the winter rust problem.
 
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