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Replacement blades for Scheppach TS2500

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Martin

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I recently bought a combination blade for my Scheppach TS2500, thinking that it would be compatible (correct bore etc), but on attempting to fit it I spotted that the existing blade has two lug holes, like this:



The arbor has corresponding lugs which make it impossible to fit a conventional blade. This is the first time I've needed to change the blade, so I hadn't spotted this before. Have any other TS2500 owners come across this? Is this part of the arbor assembly removable in order to use conventional blades?

Thanks,
Martin.
 

Woody Alan

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Martin

Yes several of us have come across this. The spring steel pins are easily drifted out of the arbor collar. HOWEVER if your machine is under warranty NMA claim you will invalidate your warranty by doing this (I have had that in writing) my machine retailer was not amused when I pointed that out as he sells a lot of other blades. I don't know what the outcome of his discussion was with NMA ....
I did think the pins might be a safety device but I couldn't see how that worked because if the blade is loose the collar would also be loose.

Cheers Alan
 

Martin

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Thanks Alan. Sounds more like a "buy scheppach" device than a safety device :shock:

I did wonder whether it might be possible to bore corresponding holes in any replacement blades, but concerns over blade balance etc. have prevented me from doing so thus far...
 

Woody Alan

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Hi Martin

I just realised how they are a safety device, it's because the pins go right through the blade into the opposite collar which is a fixed part of the arbor, so part of the drive of the blade in theory can be taken on the pins. If the nut is properly tightened this shouldn't be a problem as no other manufacturer that I know of uses this method on this size of saw.(Scrit will know if anyone) I would have looked earlier but I no longer have my Scheppach, so was going on memory.

Cheers Alan
 

ProShop

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Woody Alan":5vnqt6t7 said:
Hi Martin

If the nut is properly tightened this shouldn't be a problem as no other manufacturer that I know of uses this method on this size of saw.

Cheers Alan
This is indeed a safety device.

This is very common on many saw tables, mostly on the pro workshop machines, especially the ones that take larger blades. One of the reasons for the pins is to stop the saw blade spindle arbor spinning up leaving the blade standing still. As you are starting up quite a mass. With the pins on the arbor the blade as no choice but it spin with it.

And of course the reverse happens when the brake kicks in to stop the blade the motor will stop but the blade could & will still spin and take you outside of the recommended braking time to bring the blade to a standstill.
It dosn't matter how tight the nut is this can still happen and the heat generated by tensioned metal to metal friction is not good for the blade or the machine.

This is even more of a safety device on machines without soft start.

The Scheppach model you mention if my memory serves me correctly has a grooving or slotting accessory, which will definately come with the slots/holes for the arbor pins as the mass will be quite considerable.

IMHO buy the correct blades for the pins as this is a good safety device.

I wouldn't be suprised to see this on all saw tables in the not too distant future.
 

Martin

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Thanks Alan/Felderman,

I guess I'll have to shop for blades a bit more carefully next time!

I actually have the slotting accessory from Scheppach, which as you say uses the same mechanism. Now that you've explained it, it does make perfect sense. Now I just need to find a good supplier of (Scheppach compatible) 270mm blades...

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Mike B

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FYI this sort of attachment is very common on metal cutting saws, mainly as they require much more torque and without them the blades would probably spin on the arbor...

Couple of things that may be worth bearing in mind:
1) when attaching the sawblade, turn it in the opposite direction to its normal direction of rotation just before final tightening of the arbor nut, in order to "lock" the blade holes against the pins - this will prevent any tooth damage if the nut is not quite tight enough and the blade spins back on the arbor pins when entering the cut (this absolutely destroys the teeth on metal sawing blades!)

2) it may be possible to get holes cut into your new blade - if it is not hardened they can be drilled or if it is then you can get them done via an electrolysis style method using electrodes (**although seek pro advice here as wood saw blades spin WAY faster than metal saws**)

Cheers
Mike
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi all

HEALTH AND SAFETY WARNING.

Please note that UKW DO NOT RECOMMEND that you cut holes in saw blades and also RECOMMEND THAT YOU DO NOT remove the pins from the arbour.

Please seek PROFESSIONAL ADVICE from a qualified person.

Thanks
Neil
 

ike

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Drive pins and blade holes - all in the pursuit of safety? Call me cynical but it's also happens to be a very convenient method to cadge Scheppach users into buying extra Scheppach blades (I'm not disputing their quality, only the potential for restricting choice for the buyer).

Nice to see CMT have countered with what appear to be one-size-fits-many keyhole slots. Obviously a good thing to see improved safety features on all makes though hopefully not at the expense of previously standardized mounting dimensions.

Although my Scheppach saw doesn't have drive flange pin(s), I also would not advocate removing them were they there.

Ike
 

Martin

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Newbie_Neil":ti4umcz3 said:
Hi all

HEALTH AND SAFETY WARNING.

Please note that UKW DO NOT RECOMMEND that you cut holes in saw blades and also RECOMMEND THAT YOU DO NOT remove the pins from the arbour.

Please seek PROFESSIONAL ADVICE from a qualified person.
Point taken Neil. For what I paid for the blade (about £40) I'll just put it down to experience and put it on Ebay or something. £40 is nothing compared to having all your bodily parts intact!

So does anybody (who doesn't own a Scheppach) need a 42T 270mm Wealdon blade, going cheap? One careful owner, never used, original packaging available... :wink:

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Adam

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Martin":1m03noc8 said:
So does anybody (who doesn't own a Scheppach) need a 42T 270mm Wealdon blade, going cheap? One careful owner, never used, original packaging available... :wink:

Cheers,
Martin.
Have you tried returning it? I made a mistake with Wealden and they accepted a return. They may charge a handling fee but it'll be less than what you loose selling it elsehwere. Just explain the problem to them, they were very helpful when I called. In fact they never charged me a fee despite incurring a double post+packing fee when they sent the correct blade out so I dropped some nuggets in a charity box with their agreement.

Adam
 

Martin

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Thanks Adam - I'll give that a try. Do Wealdon also provide blades with said holes in them then (I couldn't see reference to this on their website)?

Martin.
 

Adam

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No idea, but they are very helpful - I'd give them a ring and explain the problem and see what they advise.

Adam
 

Scrit

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FelderMan":1enea7sm said:
This is indeed a safety device......

I wouldn't be suprised to see this on all saw tables in the not too distant future.
There's actually a BS standard for this and all 300mm and above saws are required to have pins (retro-fitted if industrial use). We've had these on trade saws (and many smaller German saws) for 10 or more years - all you do when buying a blade is to tell the vendor which sawbench it's going onto and they'll "pin" the blade for you - do tell them which sawbench it is as there isn't a fixed standard, especuially at 300mm and above.

Scrit
 

dennyk

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Hi All
I have the Scheppach 2500CI.

When I bought it I noticed the 2 pins in the the blade, I phoned NMA about it and was told they were a safety feature and was part of the braking system.

For a time I changed the blade to a Freud Rip Blade for when I was ripping a lot of Oak, The TS did not stop as quick with the freud blade fitted., also I had to remove the riving knife when using the freud blade

I recently bought A new Rip Blade and a 40T Cross Cut Blade from NMA, main reason being that the Riving Knife on the Scheppach did not line up with the Freud Blade and I had a lot problems with the timber closing up after the blade.

If I want to keep the riving knife in place for safety, the only blades I will use are the 2 I bought from NMA, IMHO They do everything I expect from them.

Hope this answers the question
 

Scrit

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dennyk":2jevg6v4 said:
I recently bought A new Rip Blade and a 40T Cross Cut Blade from NMA, main reason being that the Riving Knife on the Scheppach did not line up with the Freud Blade and I had a lot problems with the timber closing up after the blade.

If I want to keep the riving knife in place for safety, the only blades I will use are the 2 I bought from NMA, IMHO They do everything I expect from them.
If the riving knife doesn't line up when you are using a non-Scheppach blade is it because the Scheppach blade is thinner or because the Scheppach blade has a recess or step machined into the centre of the blade? I find it curious that there is no way to pack the seating of the riving knife with shim material to move the riving knife to the correct position - first time I've heard of this on a sawbench

Scrit
 

dennyk

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Hi Scrit

The Riving Knife on the 2500CI is thicker than the freud Blade, thats is what causes the the timber to jam when I use the freud blade with the 2500CI riving knife, the freud blade is approx 1.5mm thinner than the Scheppach blades.
 

Scrit

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Hi Denny

I'm just wondering if your supplier sold you the type of blade designed for use on portable power saws which are normally a lot thinner than those intended for use on static saws. I don't know about 250mm blades but 12in/300mm saw blades (except for the few sold specifically as thin kerf) are normally 3.2mm kerf with 2.7/2.8mm body thickness and use a 3.0mm riving knife

Scrit
 
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