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Replacement battery for a cordless 12volt electric drill?

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BML

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The battery I have is marked, " Battery VDD12B 12v 1.2 Ah B & Q Having cotacted B & Q I discovered that they are a waste of space but surerly there must be replacements for such a common battery?
 

TheUnicorn

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I don't think you'll find them, and if you do you'll pay extra for obscurity. As it is an inexpensive drill I would just start again, new drill, Lithium batteries. unless you have a particular need for 12v, then going 18v will give you more options, screwfix has a macallister and battery for £45, however I would recommend going for something a bit better, personally a drill seems to be at the heart of my toolkit, so I wouldn't buy cheap.
 

Argus

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It is possible to have re-chargable batteries re-built by replacing the internal cells, retaining the outer casing which is usually dedicated to the particular manufacturer's product.
Older, obsolete battery material can be replaced with the modern equivalents which often work better.
Have a search on the web there are companies which will do this.
Old batteries may contain prescribed materials and reputable companies will also have the legal disposal of hazardous waste formalities in place.
 

artie

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I have rebuilt Ni cad packs in the past, with varying degrees of success. Good cells are not cheap so it may not even be economical any more.
Elsewhere on this site I have seen a link for an adapter which allows "one" to use say a dewalt battery on a makita drill.
This might be an option for you.
 

TheUnicorn

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i gather adaptors can be problematic in that they do not nessacerily allow the proper communication between battery and machine and can allow the batteries to over discharge, killing or damaging them. In my opinion, at the risk of causing offence, the machine is not of a quality that warrants spending a lot of time or money, either in recelling, adapters or tracking down an obscure battery, hence my suggestion of buying a new drill with modern batteries.
 

Lons

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As the others said it's unlikely you'll find one but not worth the effort. B&Q were selling the drill with one battery for £20 but recently cleared them for only £10, I've just checked and they seem to be out of stock unless your local store has an odd one left. I'd buy something better.
 

TheTiddles

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Don’t bother! Get a new drill with modern batteries. I didn’t once, wished I’d had.

My preference is always Makita for power tools, I’ve never had a failure till a couple weeks ago and my drill gearbox went on the Fritz. Rang Makita and explained that it was a Christmas present and so I didn’t have a receipt... a courier collected it the next morning and two working days later back it came with a new gearbox, selector switch and apparently the housings were a bit dirty so they replaced them too, so the chuck and motor are original, the rest is all new... that’s service.

Aidan
 

TheUnicorn

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Don’t bother! Get a new drill with modern batteries. I didn’t once, wished I’d had.

My preference is always Makita for power tools, I’ve never had a failure till a couple weeks ago and my drill gearbox went on the Fritz. Rang Makita and explained that it was a Christmas present and so I didn’t have a receipt... a courier collected it the next morning and two working days later back it came with a new gearbox, selector switch and apparently the housings were a bit dirty so they replaced them too, so the chuck and motor are original, the rest is all new... that’s service.

Aidan
wow, you can't fault that for service. I used to have a cheap old drill, never seemed to have any charge, never very powerful, frustrating to use, jobs just got put off because it wasn't worth the effort of charging the drill. Swapped to a bosch blue several years ago, 2 batteries, never looked back, now never put off doing a quick job because the drill always has charge, or at least the next battery does, and the power is there so it does everything you ask of it. Occasionally have to drill the odd hole with my sister's cheap drill (if I'm at her house), just painful to use
 

Eric The Viking

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Now is a good opportunity to decide what you want it for, because bigger does not mean better.

If you are up ladders frequently, drilling into stone or hard brick, then obviously you need the equivalent of a chunky SDS drill, but battery powered. In this case, bigger does mean better - 18V or 24V systems will do the job, but they will be over-powered and clumsy for cabinet work.

Both Makita and Bosch have neat little 10.8V drill-drivers ("12V" in advert-speak). I have the Bosch system, but the Makita ones seem much better built, and one day I will swap over. They are good for drilling into wood with pretty much any bit that will fit the chuck (even moderate sized forstners), and VERY suitable for screwdriving. They are comfortable to hold at all angles, have LED worklights (a truly 'brilliant' idea!), and sensible torque.

With all drivers, the trick is never to let the bit "cam out", that is to slip in the head of the screw. This is most likely driving old-fashioned slotted screws or Pozidrive screws (Philliips crossheads are better in this regard, which is why they are common in manufacturing). I use diamond grit encrusted bits for that reason, and rarely get problems. But be aware that over-torque is the quickest way to snap hardened-shank screws and wreck screw heads. This is the biggest reason for 'right-sizing' a drill-driver that is to be the main one for woodwork.

I also have an impact driver in the same series - it is excellent for driving heavier screws, but has no subtelty. And there is a definite technique to be mastered to get the best from it. That said it is more economical with battery charge life than the drill. When I boarded up the attic (18mm chipboard T+G) I used both tools with Torx bits. The impact drver was not only faster, but the battery lasted around 50% longer than the one in the drill/driver. It isn't suitable for anything requiring delicacy, but for the tasks it does, it does them very well. And because the two are separate, you don't have the mass of an impact gearbox in the drill all the time, making it smaller and easier to use.

So personally I'd go for Makita 10.8V (three Lithium ion cells in each battery), with Bosch as my second choice. If you want, get something for the specifically heavy duty tasks. Personally, as I rarely do stuff up ladders, etc, and have good mains extensions, I stick with mains SDS for that.
 

Phil Russell

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Keep an eye open for special deals at the likes of B&Q, Screwfix, Toolstation, Homebase. Coming upto Christmas there could well be good deals to be had on drills with two Li batteries.
Cheers, Phil
 
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