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Removing rust from planes

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topconker

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I'm sure there have been previous threads about this, but can someone point me in the right direction?

I have two Stanley planes that I am ashamed to say have not seen the light of day for some time languishing in the back of my garage.
The outcome is I now have two slightly rusty planes that I'd like to clean up. What is the best way to achieve this apart from sqillions of man hours with wire wool?
I'm sure I read somewhere there is a liquid you can soark them in that was recommended by everyone here.
TC
 

marcros

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do a search for electrolytic rust removal, or electrolysis. there are a few good threads on the method.
 

topconker

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Thanks Scouse,
There's loads of info there which I'll follow and have a go.
You mention wiping with camellia oil, is that this stuff as seen on e-bay, (110558783640)?
I'm guessing I don't put the wooden handle in?

Thanks agin for the info.

TC
 

AndyT

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Another popular and easy method of rust removal is by using dilute acid. You can use citric acid - buy crystals from a home brewing shop and dissolve them in water. Concentration does not need to be exact - a dessert spoonful or two in a litre of warm water. Use an ice cream tub or similar - whatever is big enough to immerse the item in question. It's best to remove wooden handles first.
After several hours rust dissolves to a grey powdery stuff that you can brush off with a toothbrush or kitchen scouring pad.


Alternative acids include supermarket 'value' vinegar or phosphoric acid (apparently sold in farm suppliers as 'milk stone remover').

A search on here for citric acid will bring up plenty of before and after shots.

This does all depend on how bad the rust is - you might just need an oily rag/ fine emery paper / steel wool or some domestic scouring powder.
 

Scouse

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AndyT":wsbkx9fv said:
This does all depend on how bad the rust is - you might just need an oily rag/ fine emery paper / steel wool or some domestic scouring powder.
Andy raises a good point, electrolysis is easy, but it is a bit of a hassle and is only really worth while if you have loads of rusty bits, if something is very rusty indeed or if, like me, you are very lazy indeed! I know people who have done well with citric acid, and like everything else in the hand tool world there is more than one way to skin a cat; the method you choose, as Andy says should reflect the level of rust you encounter.

To answer your questions, I get my oil from Classic Handtools, but I imagine it is all similar stuff. Wooden handles should be removed before dipping in the solution.
 

topconker

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Another questuion then Scouse, can I use another oil then, or even a spray as spay camellia seems quite expensive?
I'm thing about PTFE spray?
TC
 

bosshogg

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Once loose flake rust clean you might want to apply a coating of Hamerwrite's Kurust, or any alternative. The afore mentioned acts with the ferrous surface to form ferrous ? (must be a trade secret as I can not find what it is) but sometimes it's called called black rust, which is a good rust, acts as a red rust inhibitor.
If I get a chance I'll post a pic of my Stanley No. 7, which has been coated for the last two winter seasons...no rust.

Cheers...bosshogg :)
 

jimi43

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Hi TC

As others have said...this one comes up quite often and there seem to be a number of ways to clear rust and restore planes such as electrolysis, elbow grease and wire wool, acids, rust removers etc.

I present exhibit A....



Not sure if your plane is worse than this bootfair find for a few quid but if it is...good luck! :mrgreen:

I use a product called CORRO DIP....which comes in litre containers and diluting 5:1 gives 6 litres...so it seems expensive at first but I still have about 5 litres left as it can be used over and over again.

I like to see something working....



....and you clearly can here...



Then you just rub off the crud....



No mucking about with equipment, no dangerous acids...totally harmless to skin and apparently infinitely re-usable.



Does it for me.

Jim
 

Unib

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Corro Dip looks good Jim - do you think you could brush that stuff onto large items (like a table saw for example) that are too big to fit in a tub or do they have to be submerged for ages?
 

jimi43

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Unib":rmehwpi0 said:
Corro Dip looks good Jim - do you think you could brush that stuff onto large items (like a table saw for example) that are too big to fit in a tub or do they have to be submerged for ages?
The link I posted above will take you to their website where all the information can be found. It would appear that the best way to use it is to submerge things in it in a plastic container for 3-24 hours and I have found their recommendation that heating the solution makes it work faster..it does. And better!

I coated some parts of my old lathe with a brush dipped in it and left it and it turned the rust black. I then scrubbed it with a plastic scouring pad and it hasn't come back so I don't see why not.

Give them a call at their customer service department. They will be able to advise you.

I only came upon it at a bootfair and paid 50p for the 1 ltr tub...I wish I had bought the whole lot the guy had! But...I would gladly pay the full amount for it. It does what it says on the "tin"!

Jim
 

Unib

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Thanks Jim - I just noticed the pdf download link when I first looked at the link, I'll have a read. I've got some old planes it's be good to clean up so I might get some and can always give it a go. 50p - what a bargain!
 

jimi43

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topconker":392pffzu said:
Jim,
That stuff looks the business, what did you use after removing the rust?
TC
I generally use copper or brass brushes to remove the rust from pitting and other tight areas.

I then removed all the paint from the base and frog and repainted. There are a number of threads on plane restoration far more effective than mine...repainting with various paints from enamel to high heat (very nice indeed!) and I am tinkering with cold Japanning as well.

The handles were rosewood so they were stripped back to base and then coated with Tru-Oil which I love the feel of...



It can be recoated many times if it wears...



Jim
 

thick_mike

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For those wanting to go the electrolysis route, I've been using it recently to remove rust from some old tools.

For small pieces I've been using an old phone charger as the power supply. I guess most people have a drawer full of these things. I just cut the phone plug off (at the end closest to the bit that goes into the phone). Then strip back some of the shielding. I use crocodile clips to attach the red cable to the sacrificial anode (old hacksaw blades) and the black lead to the item being de-rusted (the cathode). I've used jubilee clips as a convenient point to attach the crocodile clip on larger round items.

Cut a milk carton to a suitable size, add a teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda and stir to dissolve in water. The put the anode and cathode into the solution making sure they aren't touching and turn on the power.

I managed to get an old brace chuck and ratchet mechanism working by electrolysing the whole lot in one go. No need to disassemble.
 

thick_mike

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Also for those wanting to use chemicals to de-rust larger items that you can't dip...you can soak a cloth in the solution, then wrap it around or place it on the tool. You can cover with cling film or plastic bags to stop it drying out.
 

Lowlife

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I was looking at This Stuff other day, it's a gel so should be ideal for larger surfaces.

I was going to use it for removing rust from my old cast iron planer, in the end though I used a wire brush in a drill chuck to remove the worst, then liberally sprayed it with WD40 and left it for a few hours, wiped it off with paper towels and removed any remaining with thinners, then treated all bare surfaces with ProtecTool Wax.

The tables have come up really nice, a bit of staining but no rust left at all, and it didn't take very long to do.
 

topconker

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Jim,
You mention Tru-Oil, where do you get it from?
I've found Tru-Oil for gun stocks on e-bay, is that the same stuff?

Cheers,
TC
 

jimi43

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topconker":2ie2x07j said:
Jim,
You mention Tru-Oil, where do you get it from?
I've found Tru-Oil for gun stocks on e-bay, is that the same stuff?

Cheers,
TC
Indeed TC...that's the stuff.

Great for anything you touch...like guitar necks which is where I used it the most.

Each layer blends with the next so it is ideal for just adding layers later if it wears a bit.

I just love the feel of it. No "plastic" feel like some of the synthetics. It might appear expensive for a tiny little pot but it goes a very long way and you wipe it on with make-up removal pads from Boots..the sort with lint free cloth either side of a cotton wool layer.

Be careful if you are using any stain...dab on a layer first to seal the stain and when dry...continue with successive layers until you are happy with the depth. You can then leave it to harden and use micromesh to either turn to matt, silk or high gloss depending on grit size you finish on.

I take it to about this level....

Before and after (one done one not!)



Cheers

Jim
 

topconker

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Thanks Guys, I went down the electrolysis way and really pleased with the results.
I'd post a couple of photos on here but have no idea how to post them.
TC
 
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