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Removing rust from hand tools-the solution!

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Philly

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Hi All
As you may know, I have a long running problem with rust appearing on my hand tools. Seems my sweat is particularly acid and brings the brown stuff out with the slightest touch. My poor hand planes in particular get hit the worst. I have tried all the suggestions on this forum and regularly (i.e. every time they are used) wipe them down and oil them with camilia oil after use. Still, over time the rust reappears on the places I regularly touch steel.
Removing this rust normally sees me getting out the fine wet'n'dry paper, but this leaves the surface a slightly different sheen (although it does get rid of the rust). Whilst browsing the Axminster shop recently I noticed these. They are a small rubber block impregnated with abrasive, and they are used to remove blemishes from metalwork. I bought a 120 grit one and it works amazingly well. It removes all the rust easily without leaving marks and leaves the surface like new!!! Eureka! [-o<
At less than £4 they are well worth getting if you have rust problems. I was amazed how well they worked.
Cheers
Philly :D
 

OPJ

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Great stuff Philly, thank you! :D

I'm slowly building up my next order with Axminster, so I'll add this to the growing list.

I see they can also be cut to size, which suggests you are able to cut something that'll slide down a gouge quite nicely then.
 

Evergreen

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Hi Philly

Just a thought - have you ever tried a micro-crystalline wax as a rust preventative? It's what museums use for preserving everything from suits of amour to ivory and tortoiseshell. It's also used to wax dental floss!

It's quite hard to find (I got mine in Lakeland, believe it or not) and it's brilliant stuff. A little goes a very, very long way and leaves a completely dry, slightly dull film. I use it on tools, both metal and wood, and it's been particularly successful in keeping brass hinges and door furniture in a steamy kitchen looking good.

Regards.
 

engineer one

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the only thing to worry about those rubber type blocks is that they do deform quite quickly. think of them as a 6000 grit japanese water stone without the rigidity, so when using them on a flat surface, be careful.

if the rust is not too wide spread or too deep they have uses, but other wise they should be used with care.

best way is to try the axminster kits of vapour stuff, and little wax pots in
your tool box.

maybe a little talc on your hands would delay it too. but also some kind of absorbent rag, have you tried a tack rag, that has a kind of grease on it, that seems to rub off. maybe that will help.
paul :wink:
 

Philly

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Chaps
I've tried all methods-I still make them rust :roll: It definitely is me. My workshop is warm and I have a dehumidifier keeping things constant.
I do use paste wax periodically, that does help for a while. My planes live exposed on a plane cabinet, so no way to use the vapour stuff. Thanks for the advice though.
Guess its the price to pay for actually using my tools, eh? :wink: :lol:
Philly :D
 

DaveL

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Philly,

Have you tried cling film? :shock:

Just wrap yourself in it from head to toe, before touching the tools, that should stop the rust problem. :wink:
 

Philly

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Ha, ha, Guys! :roll:
Think I'll stick with the Garryflex block. Cling film is not an option, Dave. You know how funny the Missus gets when I use her kitchen consumables :wink:
Cheers
Philly :D
 

Waka

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Philly

It's good to see you using the planes instead of gloating over them :D :D

Congrats on becoming a Mod, does that mean you can no longer be a Woodkateer?
 

Philly

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Cheers Waka! No, hopefully I can be a Mod AND Woodkateer at the same time (as long as the committee don't mind :wink: )
Cheers
Ol'SweatyHands :D
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Hi Philly

Surely those abrasive pads are removing metal each time you remove rust? I've used the pads for years, and 120 grit does a fair immitation of sandpaper ... oops, it is sandpaper!

Over the past few months I have been removing rust (from old saw blades, etc) with a mild solution of Citric Acid (available in powder form from the baking section of a supermarket). Leave the item soaking overnight, and then rinse off in water with a plastic scrub. It is like Magic!

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Philly

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Hi Derek
Yes, it is an abrasive so it must be removing metal. What I like about the pads is that it leaves the surface looking like new. When I use sandpaper to remove rust the area always stands out from the rest of the tool-with the pad it all looks uniform. I like that......
Thinking about it, I remember asking Tom L-N about rust. He said at the factory they use these pads to remove rust-guess I should of taken his advice sooner :roll: And what do you know-he also sells them here...
I don't think they remove enough material to worry about the plane going out of tolerence. Although you could probably prove me wrong! :lol:
Best regards
Philly :D
 

Frank D.

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I love those abrasive blocks too. I use them quite often for all sorts of rust stains, including the saws that I forget outside :? . I've also used them to take off the black gunk from heat-treated blades, and for giving a brushed metal look to brass and other soft metals (instead of polishing). They really work quite effectively and don't seem to gouge or take off too much metal.
Philly, since you're a moderator, does that mean you have to be moderate, or even modest? No more gloating from you, I guess... :D
 

Philly

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Frank D.":qxjs8gl2 said:
Philly, since you're a moderator, does that mean you have to be moderate, or even modest? No more gloating from you, I guess... :D
Frank
I'm still reading the fine print to see what I can get away with :wink:
Philly :D
Who won a nice D23 on the Bay last night
 

David C

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0000 wire wool and Autosol chrome polish work well for us. This may be a little gentler than the coarser abrasive blocks.

For more serious rust wet and dry, but it is good to do the whole surface.

As a non sprayer I find car wax keeps rust at bay for a while and the Camellia oil habit is a daily routine.
Wipe on when the tool goes away, wipe off when going back to work. Very little is needed and my small tin sized applicator only needs spraying every week or so.

David C
 

Philly

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David
I do wipe down and oil after every use. It must be my sweat is particularly acid.
I'm still on the lookout for a cigar tin to convert like yours :wink:
Cheers
Philly :D
 
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