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Andy Kev.

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I had a wander around the local car boot sale this morning and came away with a Stanley 923g brace for ten euros. It seems to be in very good condition and the pad in particular rotates very smoothly. I suspect that it may have not seen much use.

The only thing is that when I loosen the chuck the jaws don't spontaneously open, although when taken apart the spring seems to be strong and in good condition. I suspect that the bloke who sold it has just whacked masses of WD40 or similar on it (there's a fair bit of black, thin oily liquid which seems to have been removing the crud of time) and taken some sort of sanding type tool to the surface of the drill in general. (He informed me that it was "new". Luckily I could see what it was and that it was basically in very good condition.)

I therefore have two questions:

a. Does anybody have any recommendations for the further treatment of the spring/jaws with a view to getting them in tip top condition.

b. Is there anything of particular interest about the 923g model? It looks as if it is meant to be fairly heavy duty to me.
 

AndyT

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Make sure that the inside of the outer cone is smooth - I think it's softer than the jaws so you can sometimes get a bit of damage that the tips of the jaws jam against.
Go over the outside surfaces of the joints with fine emery so they are smooth running.

A drop of oil should keep everything moving ok. If you are worried about sawdust mixing with oil, perhaps a smear of wax instead.

It looks like a useful tool if it's like these:

https://thevalleywoodworker.blogspot.co ... s.html?m=1
 

Andy Kev.

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Thanks Andy, that is indeed it, although mine is not one the early models with the alligator jaws. I'll follow your advice.

The fact that mine is the 923g suggests a possible five other variants (a-f) before it appeared. I do wonder at the sheer range of braces that was manufactured, even more so by Millers Falls than Stanley. Each one was clearly developed to offer some sort of advantage or capability, yet that never appears to be described.

I'm afraid that I find a model in good condition at car boot prices to be fairly irresistible i.e. I don't really need a third 10" brace!
 

AndyT

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Andy Kev.":3nit3f8g said:
I'm afraid that I find a model in good condition at car boot prices to be fairly irresistible i.e. I don't really need a third 10" brace!
Yebbut...if you find enough, you won't need to waste time swapping bits over!

Seriously though, I agree with you about the profusion of models. A lot like mobile phone apps today. :)
 

ED65

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Andy Kev.":s445bcsz said:
a. Does anybody have any recommendations for the further treatment of the spring/jaws with a view to getting them in tip top condition.
I have one standard for the interior of a brace's chuck: absolutely clean. This is irrespective of whether I leave the outside dark or restore it fully, the inside of the shell, the threading and the jaws have to be spotless.

Doesn't matter how you get there but the fore part of the shell interior should be shiny steel, the exterior bearing surfaces of the jaws taken as far or brighter, and then the chuck works as it should even if the spring is a little tired.

Andy Kev.":s445bcsz said:
...taken some sort of sanding type tool to the surface of the drill in general.
Do you have any sanding scratches you need to erase to get it looking the way you want?
 

Vann

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Andy Kev.":1u8oc7yj said:
...The fact that mine is the 923g suggests a possible five other variants (a-f) before it appeared. I do wonder at the sheer range of braces that was manufactured, even more so by Millers Falls than Stanley. Each one was clearly developed to offer some sort of advantage or capability, yet that never appears to be described...
Borringeoff is your man. He's forgotten more about braces than I've ever known. I think he's a member here, although he mostly hangs around on the Aussie forum.

Cheers, Vann.
 

Boringgeoff

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Thanks for the boost Vann but there's really nothing I can add to the advice already given. I'm a bit busy this morning but I'll have a look this afternoon and see if I've got that model, though my US Stanley hoard is fairly small in comparison with my UK and Au Stanleys.
I must say I shudder when I hear sandpaper and brace in the same sentence.
Cheers,
Geoff.
 

Boringgeoff

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I've had a look and found three which are marked: No 923-10 IN, No 923-8 IN -Y and No 923- 10 IN - Y. They all resemble the one in the link provided by Andy T. I have no idea what the" -Y " means on the branding.
I think the Stanley UK No 73 is based on this model apart from not adopting the adjustable chuck attachment patented by Harris J. Cook in 1933 (US Pat' 1915245) The Au models are the same as UK with an A preceding the number.
AndyKev could you double check the number on your brace for us please I'm wondering what the "g" is after the 923?
Cheers,
Geoff.
 

AndyT

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I had a quick look in some old catalogues online and couldn't find any suffix letters at all.
Could it be the size - an 8 or a 6?

A photo would be nice.
 

Andy Kev.

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Thanks for the replies, gentlemen.

I'm working away from home until the end of the month and so will have a look in detail once I get back.

ED65: Thanks for the tip about the inside of the chuck. Will do. The outside seemed pretty smooth.

AndyT and boringgeoff: I'll confirm the "g" after the number when I get back.
 

ED65

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Boringgeoff":885cro1m said:
I must say I shudder when I hear sandpaper and brace in the same sentence.
Well there's sanding and there's sanding. If there's one thing I do hate it's seeing an old tool that seems to have been randomly attacked with abrasives, but I regularly use sanding when restoring braces back to shiny, primarily utilising the shoeshine technique (à la what must be the most famous brace restoration guide online, on LumberJocks).
 

Andy Kev.

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I've just had a look at it. It is most definitely and without a doubt a "G".
 

Boringgeoff

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I don't think I've seen any with the G suffix and I'm happy to go with that explanation Andy. Now what does the "Y on' mine mean, made for Yankees, yobbos or youths?
 

Andy Kev.

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That seems to be a plausible explanation and it would explain the apparent absence of a to f models.

Interestingly, if you google "Stanley 923G Brace" you get a couple of them offered for sale. This suggests that sellers read it on the brace, take it at face value and offer for sale accordingly.
 

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