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Record wood vice linings

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Gavlar

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hi all,

I have a Record 52 and a 52 1/2 vice, both vintage, recently acquired for the bench I am currently building. My query concerns the fitting of the jaw linings/cheeks.

Both have 5/16 Whitworth threaded holes, which implies that the linings are supposed to be fixed by machine screws or bolts inserted through the lining and into the vice jaw. This is how the previous owner has done it, see photo, However, that means holes in the linings to recess the screw heads, plus they are a pain to change (large screwdriver needed, not enough room to use it). There's a nice thread here where it's suggested to use magnets to attach the linings instead. Or is it better to ignore the threaded holes and use woodscrews from the outer faces of the jaw, as the newer models seem to do?

I'm tempted by the magnets, but they might allow the linings to move under pressure, and is that a good or bad thing?

Help please from any owners who have wrestled with the same dilemma!

thanks
Gavin
 

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mikej460

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I installed new beech linings into mine 15 years ago but I've forgotten how I did it. I'll take a look tomorrow and get back to you.
 

dannyr

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Suggest ignoring the screw-thread and a stubby woodscrew from the 'newer' (metal) side (although I have a couple of woodworking vices from about 1860s - not Record - that have holes with no thread and screw chamfers obviously meant to be screwed in from the iron side into the wood - so not that new, just two schools of thought).

But then it's much easier for the rear jaw to fit the wood before attaching to bench
 
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Alpha-Dave

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I have a 52.5 and a 53, I used countersunk hex-drive machine screws (5/16ths UNC) on both. It works well, so why bother with anything else? I ran a tap through the treads to clean them out.

These from Spalding fasteners, great quality, no complaints after 2 years:

Edit: Looks like they were 5/16ths.
 
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TheUnicorn

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I have a 52.5 and a 53, I used countersunk hex-drive machine screws (3/8ths UNC) on both. It works well, so why bother with anything else? I ran a tap through the treads to clean them out.

These from Spalding fasteners, great quality, no complaints after 2 years:
Where does one buy whitworth screws, or are they from a vintage stock?
 

Alpha-Dave

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Where does one buy whitworth screws, or are they from a vintage stock?
They are new, I think for certain sizes the old/vintage car/equipment market is big enough that they are still viable.
 

Nigel Burden

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I have a 52 1/2 and have never had problems removing the jaw. There is sufficient room to get a fairly large screwdriver, all be it at a slight angle, between the jaws. I also have a couple of old screwdriver bits with tapered square ends for fitting in a brace. These can be used with an adjustable wrench where space is a bit limited.

Alternatively, dismantle the vice to remove them. They don't need to be tightened too tight when you put the new ones.

Nigel.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Just counterbore the holes in the jaws and use set screws with a socket to drive them. it's not difficult. I bought the screws at a local steel yard.

Incidentally, I've used hardwood linings for as long as I've had a bench ......... up til last time when I used spruce. Softer is better as there's less likelihood of bruising anything.
 

heronviewer

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I have a 52E and it has hardwood jaws fixed with wood screws. I have expendable drop in soft wood jaws that drop in and are held by the hardwood ones. As I use the vice for all sorts of things, they get replaced from time to time - looks like replacement soon ! They are cocked up so you can see ewhat they are.
 

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Gavlar

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Thanks all for your replies. I like the drop-in jaws idea! Also yes, hex head or allen key screws would work better than slotted, I'll do that.
cheers all
 

OldWood

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AlphaDave - add the vintage railway world into that list too. And that is not just steam but early diesels too.
Rob
 

Jules

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Hi, I’ve done this - mine is a Record 55 but I’m sure the principle would be the same.
I used T & G floorboard for the cheeks - it took me about an hour a piece to mark up and chisel our the rebates and fit the cheeks. The back cheek is screwed to the workbench - that way it’s easy to remove (and I was too lazy to remove the vice to fit it from the hidden holes at the back). The front cheek is fitted with a couple of short screws that are using the holes in the vice (I did buy some threaded flat screws but they were metric and didn’t fit)
The benefit of the flush back cheek is that I can use the bench to help hold things (either horizontally or if at an odd angle).
 

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Vann

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I have a No.52 (and a used No.53 awaiting fitting in it's place). I use CSK machine screws - installed using a stubby screwdriver.

As Jules mentions above, woodscrews from the outside may be easier from the front jaw, but require removing the vise to fit the rear liner - which is a big PITA.

Cheers, Vann.
 

Jules

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Vann, that’s why I screwed my rear jaw cheeks to the work bench - quick and easy to fit and just as easy to remove.
And if I say so myself, being flush with the side of the workbench they are also aesthetically pleasing to the eye (well, mine at least!). I’m sure I got some OCD in me!
 

Garden Shed Projects

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Vann, that’s why I screwed my rear jaw cheeks to the work bench - quick and easy to fit and just as easy to remove.
And if I say so myself, being flush with the side of the workbench they are also aesthetically pleasing to the eye (well, mine at least!). I’m sure I got some OCD in me!
Fitted my Parkinson a while back and installed a Record 52 1/2 last week using a similar technique. used oak on the Parky and beech on the record as that’s what I had laying around.
Made the jaw lining a bit thicker as I wanted a dog hole in each.
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F5D33DF3-92BF-41CD-B767-5127097CB555.jpeg
 

Phil Pascoe

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I used hard woods for years, but find really soft spruce etc. better - less chance of marking anything, and if you use your vice for anything and everything as I do, it deforms to suit.
 
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