Record Ridgeway Quality

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BearTricks

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I spotted a Record Ridgeway number 5 jack plane in a local antiques shop. Decent condition and I’ve quite enjoyed cleaning up my other planes and I need a jack plane so considering buying it.

I found a bit of info online, Ridgeway seems to be an old Sheffield company who were bought by Record, then Bahco then Irwin. Not much online about quality (lots about urban explorers breaking in to the abandoned factory though) but I’m assuming quality dipped after Bahco bought them.

Does anyone have any experience with Ridgeway Record planes specifically and can vouch for the quality?
 

Vann

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...Does anyone have any experience with Ridgeway Record planes specifically and can vouch for the quality?
I'd not jump at a Record from the Ridgeway era. By the time Record and Ridgeway merged, quality was well into decline. That's not to say it will definitely be carp, just that the chances of get a carp one are much higher.

Cheers, Vann.
 

Ttrees

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Presuming this plane works out cheaper Than something for about 30 from the bay,
Plenty of bad ones to choose from the good brands aswell,
Main thing to me. Is the sole thickness should it be hefty, IMO that's the insurance.
As far as I'm aware not many planes if any, apart from possibly the t5 will have sides square to the sole.
I've not had a.preference for laminated vs later irons, although some prefer the older ones.
If anything I might prefer the later ones as you can use at least the the ends for scraping, and for tools possibly at a later date.
(Sharp edges if not careful may damage underside cap iron if yo u sharpen the whole thing)

Hefty sole casting with no cracks or chips, plenty of life in the iron left,
Then it's just the same as any other in use,
Although some bells and whistles maybe nicer , i.e cam lock on the lever cap .

If looking closely again at this plane, may be useful to also have a look to see if sole is of even thickness
Along it's width, as well as trying to get an idea of flatness if hefty enough

Tom
 

Marc Shaw

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I spotted a Record Ridgeway number 5 jack plane in a local antiques shop. Decent condition and I’ve quite enjoyed cleaning up my other planes and I need a jack plane so considering buying it.

I found a bit of info online, Ridgeway seems to be an old Sheffield company who were bought by Record, then Bahco then Irwin. Not much online about quality (lots about urban explorers breaking in to the abandoned factory though) but I’m assuming quality dipped after Bahco bought them.

Does anyone have any experience with Ridgeway Record planes specifically and can vouch for the quality?
Nice history here. says Ridgeway bought it in '72 and that "record took over production of Ridgeway's boring tools" so maybe the early RW planes were business as usual? History
 

Vann

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...Hefty sole casting with no cracks or chips, plenty of life in the iron left,
Then it's just the same as any other in use,
Although some bells and whistles maybe nicer...
I was thinking more of the machining, such as the interface between the frog and the main casting. I've seen them with the frog embedded in the blue paint.

Of course almost any plane can be made to work if you have the time and know what you're doing.

Cheers, Vann.
 

Ttrees

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I was thinking more of the machining, such as the interface between the frog and the main casting. I've seen them with the frog embedded in the blue paint.

Of course almost any plane can be made to work if you have the time and know what you're doing.

Cheers, Vann.
I had assumed the machining would the same on older planes, but fair point.
one could also mention whether the mouth is large like on the later Stanley's with plastic handles, it might be a giveaway
that the frog be of sound bedding or not.

Those things used to be seemingly important to me before I learned to use hand planes, as the red/burgundy planes bed isn't great
Compared to the previous planes I pointlessly fettled for no reason,
But now I have no need for tight mouths, so there is plenty of contact.

That's not to say that those planes could be worse, I'd pot shot guess not so, and same as oldish Stanley if the mouth is small.
Can't find any on the net to see.

Tom
 

Auldfart2010

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My Mum worked at the Dronfield factory on Wreakes Lane in the late 70's and early 80's. I have a lot of heirloom tools from then.
 

clogs

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
Marc and others.....
I use those small Bacho files all the time for deburring and polishing on the lathe and mill....
My thinking was that if they can stand upto HSS chainsaw blades they'r good enough around the shop....have quite a selection now....I have no idea how many miles they have done....still great after at least 10 years.....not even maked let alone blunt.....
Swedish Steel was ALWAYS rated as good as Shefield's best...
anyone got an early Bolinder D engine under the bench....?
 

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