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Record cl lathes

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Jameshow

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Don't be too hard on DECENT single bar machines. I learned to turn 45 years ago on a secondhand Gamages version of the original Coronet Minor, and it did everything from tiny lidded containers to an 18" wheel for a Hebridean spinning wheel. Last heard of it had gone to Tools for Self-reliance, so is probably still in use somewhere in the world.
Love my myford ml8.

It's not the single Vs double tubes that gives stiffness but rather the second moment of area. IE the distance apart the material is...

Cheers James
 

Kevbee

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I only started woodturning in 2019 (at age 72) after a course at Axminster. I wanted to mainly turn bowls and do artistic stuff. I did not want to buy lightweight and be disappointed so bought an Axminster Trade lathe which is likely to last me out! Get their catalogue. I converted our attached single car garage into a workshop. I have found it worthwhile to buy wood turning books, mainly secondhand to get ideas and there is YouTube as well. As I have no mechanical experience I rejected the idea of second hand lathes. At the end it is what you want to afford. Covid lockdowns helped as we stayed at home and I have turned loads of stuff. Good luck.
Hi thanks for your reply, I'm torn between Axminster and Record and would like new but when I look a second hand you get more for you money but run the risk of possible problems down the line.
 

Adam W.

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Being new to woodturning too, my advice is to get the biggest/best lathe you can afford. I'm certainly happy with my purchase, although it isn't a beginners lathe. I bought it for turning big circular picture frames, so went large and heavy.

I don't regret the cost, as the lathe is truly excellent and a joy to use.
 

brittonc

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I started turning this year and purchased a new CL3 Next Gen lathe. I'm really happy with it BUT in hindsight should have got something with variable speed. At the time I didn't think it would be an issue but the more I use it, the more I find it's a pain changing speed - having to constantly undo the cover, loosen the motor, pull the belt across to another pulley, tighten the motor, put the cover back on!! I know there are conversions available but they are expensive and something I won't be able to do for a long time. If I were in your position now I'd definitely get a lathe with variable speed control.
 

kinverkid

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I started turning this year and purchased a new CL3 Next Gen lathe. I'm really happy with it BUT in hindsight should have got something with variable speed. At the time I didn't think it would be an issue but the more I use it, the more I find it's a pain changing speed - having to constantly undo the cover, loosen the motor, pull the belt across to another pulley, tighten the motor, put the cover back on!! I know there are conversions available but they are expensive and something I won't be able to do for a long time. If I were in your position now I'd definitely get a lathe with variable speed control.
I took the screw off that cover then glued an earth magnet to the underside where the screw hole is about ten years ago. I don't change the speed too often. I will probably change it up once I have a round (spindle or face turning) then, maybe, turn it down to sand and finish. But still, not having to mess with that fiddly little screw takes some of the pain out of it.

Gary
 

u38cg

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Worth saying that at some point Record changed from hollow bars to solid. Mine is a newer solid one and I wouldn't want hollow bars, to be honest. The design of the lathe is good but can be done better, and well engineered modern lathes are a noticeable improvement even on the solid bars.

That said I think you're quite right to try and get an entire set-up in one go second-hand - cheaper and easier all round.
 

Lazurus

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I have a VB 36 with solid bed bars and love it, the only issue you will have as opposed to a flat bed is the majority of accessories are designed for flat beds so needs some head scratching sometimes to find a work around
 

Phil Pascoe

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If you have hollow bars you can do as I did - fill them with concrete. The beauty of variable speed isn't so much the ease of changes, it's that the speed is infinitely variable. You can puts something on that's completely out of balance and shaking like hell, speed it up or slow it down by 50rpm and it'll be fine. A couple of cuts and it'll be out again, slow it or speed it up a few rpm and it'll be fine again. it's like getting a steering wheel shake on your car when a wheel's out of balance - it might start at 60mph and stop at 65mph, 58mph or 67mph and it's fine.
 

Jonzjob

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My CL1 is about 24 years old and has solid bars snf is pretty stable. I also have a 3ø variable speed motor on it and at the mo i=I have a lump of wet cherry that's well out of balance and as you say Phill, a tweek on the speed takes it from trying to 'leave the room' to being quite acceptable and as I take bits of the speed can be increased slowly. That 3ø motor has transformed my CL1 !
 
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