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Reclaimed scaffold board finishing advise

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Cosens1

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Hi gang, new member here...

I'm putting together a bed out of reclaimed scaffold board - here's a picture of it roughly assembled/balanced together!!

IMG_6805.jpg


I like the rustic but not too rustic nature of them once sanded smooth, but what I am now considering is how to finish the boards.

Considerations:
  • Colour - I'd like to preserve the natural colour of the boards as they currently are.
  • Dust residue - after sanding, I am blowing/brushing/removing dust from the boards but its a never-ending task. Obviously, I'm not keen on inhaling this dust when sleeping so I am thinking that its probably best to coat the boards in something of some sort.
Could anybody recommend or suggest a product/brand to use to tick both of the above boxes?

Thanks for reading!
 

Luke Barnard

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I know that several of the wood recycling projects that make furnitue out of reclaimed scaffold board use the Osmo products for finishing. To finish they sand to 120 grit, brush on a thin coat of Osmo oil and wipe off. They apply two coats and then rub down with 1200 grit paper. At that point the finish is smooth to the touch but definitely still rustic.
 

Cabinetman

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my Son did this, lining the wall in his wardrobe, no finish, no sanding, not saying it’s a good idea, but even I came round to thinking it looked ok. Ian
B7D52820-21DD-411E-8294-A73DD06AE3A5.jpeg
 

Cosens1

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I know that several of the wood recycling projects that make furnitue out of reclaimed scaffold board use the Osmo products for finishing. To finish they sand to 120 grit, brush on a thin coat of Osmo oil and wipe off. They apply two coats and then rub down with 1200 grit paper. At that point the finish is smooth to the touch but definitely still rustic.
Thanks Luke - thats really helpful. So 1200 grit sand, brush-on oil and wipe off twice, 1200 grit sand once again... presumably, the oil seeps into the wood so the second sanding won't remove the oil? Also, would you power-sand on the second time over?
 

marcros

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Thanks Luke - thats really helpful. So 1200 grit sand, brush-on oil and wipe off twice, 1200 grit sand once again... presumably, the oil seeps into the wood so the second sanding won't remove the oil? Also, would you power-sand on the second time over?
Note that Luke mentioned one hundred and twenty grit and twelve hundred grit. Your summary didn't!
 

smackie

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We’ve used the Osmo Polyx oil matt and semi-matt finishes for a few resurfacing jobs at the house. If done carefully, it’s a nice natural finish that doesn’t scream “look at me” which is useful on rustic/reclaimed materials.

Osmo can be a real dust magnet when you’re working (altho the pure matt finishes aren’t so obvious) so I’d make it easy on yourself and give the pieces and surrounding area a good vacuum before you start. Especially if you have pets. 😀
 

Luke Barnard

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Thanks Luke - thats really helpful. So 1200 grit sand, brush-on oil and wipe off twice, 1200 grit sand once again... presumably, the oil seeps into the wood so the second sanding won't remove the oil? Also, would you power-sand on the second time over?
Yes, as Marco just mentioned, you sand up to 120 grit, apply twice (brush on and wipe off), and then give a light sand with 1200 grit. It does soak into the wood, and the light sand with 1200 grit doesn't really remove any material, just knocks off the rough nibs from the oil curing and buffs the waxes left on the surface.
 

TheUnicorn

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Yes, as Marco just mentioned, you sand up to 120 grit, apply twice (brush on and wipe off), and then give a light sand with 1200 grit. It does soak into the wood, and the light sand with 1200 grit doesn't really remove any material, just knocks off the rough nibs from the oil curing and buffs the waxes left on the surface.
Having not done this myself I'm not saying you are wrong, however, for a rustic finish the 1200 seems overkill, if you are looking to essentially buff the finish, why not just work it over with a cloth?
 

Luke Barnard

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Having not done this myself I'm not saying you are wrong, however, for a rustic finish the 1200 seems overkill, if you are looking to essentially buff the finish, why not just work it over with a cloth?
Well, I'm not really saying this is the way it *should* be done. But I do know this is how at least one of the wood recycling projects finishes it's scaffold furniture (I volunteered there for a bit), and their products certainly fit the "rustic" bill. You could be right that similar results could be found by buffing out with a cloth, but I've not done it myself so can't say for sure.
 

Cosens1

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120 grit initially, 1200 to finish!
We’ve used the Osmo Polyx oil matt and semi-matt finishes for a few resurfacing jobs at the house. If done carefully, it’s a nice natural finish that doesn’t scream “look at me” which is useful on rustic/reclaimed materials.

Osmo can be a real dust magnet when you’re working (altho the pure matt finishes aren’t so obvious) so I’d make it easy on yourself and give the pieces and surrounding area a good vacuum before you start. Especially if you have pets. 😀
I'll vacuum the boards, and will probably do this outside I'd think.

Thanks for the tip, I really appreciated it :)
 

Sean Hellman

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Sand, apply oil, such as Danish, with brush, wipe off and let dry. You may want another coat. No sanding in-between. This is the quickest way apart from a spray finish.
 

mikej460

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I would simply get a few pieces of scrap scaffold and test all the above, then choose the one you like best. My brother loves making stuff from old scaffold boards and used them when fitting out my niece's Beauty Salon, I don't think he used any sealer or finish, he just sanded them.
Salon Scaffold Boards.jpg
 

Benchwayze

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Before you start, scarify the boards well with a stiff, wire brush. Gets rid of all sorts of debris that has been trodden in.

John
 
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