• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Reccomendations/combination square

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

beaver

Established Member
Joined
26 Dec 2009
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Location
ashford/kent
Hi Guys
I need to buy a new/secondhand combination square, I need it to be reasonably accurate but cant afford Starret/Brown and sharp prices. Any reccomendations available.
 

John15

Established Member
Joined
27 Jun 2013
Messages
1,624
Reaction score
39
Location
Near Oxford
I have a Stanley. It's very accurate but the knurled tightening nut won't tighten properly by hand - I find I have to use pliers which is a real pain.

John
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
22,126
Reaction score
2,375
Location
Derbyshire
Bahco good, and cheap.
 

Zeddedhed

Established Member
Joined
13 Sep 2013
Messages
1,066
Reaction score
27
Location
Tunbridge Wells
I've tried the Bahco and the Stanley ones and find that they don't always lock up properly square - not a problem for site carpentry (they're probably only less than half a degree out) but no use for furniture or fine work.
I ended up buying this one from Axi:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-ca ... square-set

I've been using it for over a year now and all is well.
 

RobinBHM

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2011
Messages
7,069
Reaction score
1,328
Location
Wst Sussex
Ive got a bahco, its pretty accurate and slides smoothly.

For precision marking I always use an engineers square.
 

geordie

Established Member
Joined
28 Mar 2014
Messages
44
Reaction score
0
Location
halifax
I got a stanley 1 and like zed says its fine for general site work mine,s still fine after about 8 years
 

beaver

Established Member
Joined
26 Dec 2009
Messages
95
Reaction score
0
Location
ashford/kent
Thanks for the quick replies guys, did look at the axminster one Zed pointed out, guess its between that and a bahco.
 

pcb1962

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2014
Messages
1,063
Reaction score
145
Location
Surrey
Almost any combination square can be made accurate - see this John Heisz video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxrCZd7r6qE
I have five of them, after seeing this video I checked them and 4 were out by varying amounts, now they're all spot on. I didn't use the blade though like he does, I used a diamond needle file.
 

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
1
Location
North Suffolk
I think people make a mistake aiming for a super accurate combination square.

For me, the virtue of a combination square is its versatility and general usefulness. As such, it's used too much to stay accurate to close tolerances, even if it was made as such.

My recommendation would be to buy a combination square with good enough tolerances for woodworking purposes, but weighted heavily to ergonomics and handling. This is IMHO best served by a second hand premium square.

And to buy a fixed, ugly (sharp arrised and uncomfortable) engineer's square for when very close tolerance (e.g. machine setup) is needed.

BugBear
 

Fromey

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2010
Messages
570
Reaction score
0
Location
Frome, Somerset, UK
+1

I love my Starrett combination square and I'm pretty sure I'm getting a Chris Vesper double square for my 50th (at least that's what my wife has asked my parents to get me). But I agree that if you want serious accuracy, go with an engineer's square.




bugbear":265y5999 said:
I think people make a mistake aiming for a super accurate combination square.

For me, the virtue of a combination square is its versatility and general usefulness. As such, it's used too much to stay accurate to close tolerances, even if it was made as such.

My recommendation would be to buy a combination square with good enough tolerances for woodworking purposes, but weighted heavily to ergonomics and handling. This is IMHO best served by a second hand premium square.

And to buy a fixed, ugly (sharp arrised and uncomfortable) engineer's square for when very close tolerance (e.g. machine setup) is needed.

BugBear
 

bugbear

Established Member
Joined
16 Jul 2004
Messages
13,074
Reaction score
1
Location
North Suffolk
tobyriches":1bn2qmms said:
Was in the same place as you and have just bought a Moore Wright carpenters square.,feels good and is dead on square

http://www.machine-dro.co.uk/300mm-12-m ... tAod32gAgg

That's a new product for them - it's explicitly a carpenter's square, and the head is aluminium, not cast iron. It's reminiscent of the 1950's when Rabone also made a carpenters square, as well as engineer's combintation square. You often see dealers trying to pass off the old Rabone carpenters square at engineer spec prices.

BugBear
 

Harbo

In Memorium
Joined
13 Nov 2006
Messages
5,548
Reaction score
2
Location
Hampshire
For general use I use a couple of "Empire" ones that are accurate enough and not that expensive. I've also got a very cheap 150mm Bahco one that somebody sold on the bay a while back which is good too.

For reference work I've a set of Metal Engineers squares and one to DIN? Standards I bought from Dicks which is cut from a piece of steel.
I used this when I made my own squares

0295b9ce0815b07c50fe14695a7291db.jpg


Rod
 
Top