Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Rebate plane with a convex sole?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
800
Reaction score
63
Location
Suffolk
Has such a thing ever existed? I've not seen one pictured ever, but that might be because we now have routers. I could definitely use one to cut the binding channels on a guitar or ukulele, and it would be fun to make one (a woodie would be fine).

But the fact I've never heard of one suggests they don't work! Does anyone know?
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
482
Location
Bristol
They exist by the thousand. Just called Rounds. Made from 1/8" to a couple of inches. Used with matching Hollows to make all manner of mouldings.
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
800
Reaction score
63
Location
Suffolk
Should have specified longitudinal curve - thanks CheshireChappie for guessing what I meant!

The sole only needs to be 8mm wide for what I want - would a hacksaw blade be stout enough to make the iron from, or should I be looking for a plough plane blade?
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,030
Reaction score
482
Location
Bristol
If you can't find an old wooden one on eBay (and you'd have to look through lots of pictures as the seller probably wouldn't know what to call it) I think the next easiest way would be to find an old narrow wooden rebate plane and reshape the sole to the curve you need. You would need to shape the side of the iron a bit too but you'd avoid the difficult mortice and wedge cutting.
 

rxh

Established Member
Joined
2 May 2011
Messages
699
Reaction score
72
Location
Surrey
Veritas make miniature shoulder planes. It looks possible to file one into a convex curve. Not cheap though.
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
800
Reaction score
63
Location
Suffolk
I have one of those, and it's too useful! But only a 6mm blade, and very fiddly to use.

Cheshirechappie's link shows a woodie which is much fatter above the working part and thus gives you something to hold. I'll bodge up something along those lines.
 

custard

Established Member
Joined
20 Aug 2008
Messages
7,111
Reaction score
487
Location
Hampshire
There was a coach maker's rebate plane in the workshop tool box where I trained, so I gave it a go. I found it extremely difficult to use and apparently that was the general experience.

You're constantly wrestling with a couple of intractable problems. There's no cap iron so even at a high pitch there's a tendency to tear out, and because you're following a curve you're frequently planing against the grain. In order to keep tear out under control you need a super fine cut (and a very sharp iron), but that fine cut means its quite tricky to keep the iron in the cut. You just have to rotate the plane by a whisker and you drop out of the cut. Consequently I found myself making frustratingly slow progress with a series of short shavings. If you used the tool regularly I'm sure you'd eventually get reasonably adept, but it's a long slow learning curve!

Personally I'd use a scratch stock for relatively fine work like a musical instrument or most furniture scale components. For joinery scale work I'd be tempted to chop the curved rebate out with a chisel, might not be a tidy finish but I reckon it would take a tenth of the time and save a lot of hair rending and teeth gnashing!
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
800
Reaction score
63
Location
Suffolk
Hmm, plenty of food for thought here.

A few years back I bodged up a trial scratch stock and didn't get on with it, but I was using the corner of a cabinet scraper so maybe a thicker piece of metal would improve it. Certainly easier to use.

My plane would need a really sharp curve, maybe a three inch radius, and I was wondering what angle to set the blade at (because there is no flat surface to register against the work).

Maybe a scratch stock using an old half inch chisel? Wedged, like a plane? Might make a trial version and give it a go.
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
2,951
Reaction score
190
Location
North West
surely they must have used something like this in the past for bullnose windows? so it wouldn't have just been a tool for wheelrights, I've seen coopers using similarly weird tools probably unique to their craft.
 
Top