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rebate cleanup hand tool?

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thetyreman

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what's the best tool for cleaning up rebates? I find that sometimes they aren't quite dead square to the edge, despite best efforts...
 

Jacob

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A rebate plane perhaps? If you really need a perfect rebate then you need right and left handed skews so you can work the grain downhill either way. A compromise would be non skewed. Left hand or non skewed rebate planes are fairly uncommon, presumably because rarely needed.
PS just read the question :roll: - to get them dead square you need to work to marks.
 

Jacob

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Working to marks: I copied this from an earlier post. Thought I'd posted some snaps too but couldn't find them.
What you do first is mark up with a gauge the length of the rebate, both lines - and also each end of the workpiece.
Then you start a rebate as best you can with you fingers as a fence, well within the lines.
Then you turn the plane on edge and work it back to a line
Then you turn it the other way and work it back to the other line.
Then you square it up with reference to the lines you put on the ends of the workpiece.
Sounds complicated but it's obvious once you get stuck in.
 

Trevanion

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thetyreman":2cmxyp5o said:
a vintage stanley no78
I'm sure you know this already but if they're not sharp on the very edge of the blade they'll create a stepped rebate, the severity depends on how dull the very tip of the edge is.

I don't know if it's good practice, but when I was messing about with hand tools I ground what I'd call a "Draught angle" of about 5 or so degrees onto the side of the iron which was against the rebate shoulder. Not sure if it would make a difference at all but it made sense in my mind at the time, it's a common practice on spindle moulder cutters to stop friction and burning. Edit: I've marked the wrong side of the blade to put the draught angle below #-o

 

Jacob

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Trevanion":a4gukehn said:
thetyreman":a4gukehn said:
a vintage stanley no78
I'm sure you know this already but if they're not sharp on the very edge of the blade they'll create a stepped rebate, the severity depends on how dull the very tip of the edge is....
Well yes you need to back off the edge of any rebate or shoulder plane - Trevanion's "Draught angle".
But in any case it's easy to correct a rebate by simple turning the tool on edge and cleaning the "wall" as the last step, even with dull blade. In fact it's the way to do it - the wall is often a bit raggedy and may need finishing.
With a 78 you need to take off the nicker, depth stop and the fence, at some point - they are not as useful as they look. In fact if you work to marks it's easier and faster just to leave them in the box.
PS yes and shoulder plane does nice job, but unfortunately cost lots more than a 78.
PPS a 78 for sale without all the attachments is still worth having, there's nothing you can't do without them. They are often missing for this very reason.
 

Mike Jordan

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image.jpg
. Why not the proper tool for a good finish? A badger plane. Much better if the finish surface needs to be good.
 

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