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Reasonably priced beginner lathes

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Anonymous

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Im new to this woodturning malarkey and bought myself a Clarke CWL6B...and I've already realised that its not much good :cry:
Can anyone recommend a lathe for under £200 that is a bit "beefier" and can take a good range of chucks etc?
Thanks.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I bought the Axminster Perform CCBL at their show.It takes their own range of chucks which have plenty of extra fittings. I had the same lathe as you but the Perform is far better. My main criticism is the tool rest, it was rough at first but I ground it smooth. I also bought the Perform tool set, if you are using cheap chisels you should buy better ones before you buy a new lathe,you may find you can manage with the Clarke.
 

blurk99

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Hi Roohster,

I've got a Delta F46-717 lathe, it's a heavy cast iron based job which helps dampen vibration very well, they cost about £300 new, the bed and motor arrangement looks very similar to the Perform lathes from axminster. because the headstock swivels round it's useful for the larger projects, you're not limited to a 12" diameter say.. I was given a CWL6B for christmas 2 years ago and then i got bitten by the bug and immediately found i wanted a more substantial lathe.. so i went shopping.
My father in law has the 'Ferm' lathe from screwfix for about £130 and he gets on very well with it but it is mounted on a really beefy stand he made himself.
As an aside have you snapped all the belts that came with the lathe yet? when i phoned to get replacements i was told by clarke that they do two belts - the funny pale beige things and the more robust black belts, they did last about 5 times longer i found, worth the extra bit of money.

Jim
 

morrisminordriver

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Hi Roohster,
I too am new to turning and have been asking similar questions ref lathe purchases.
I kept a look out on Ebay for a 2nd hand lathe and got a good condition Axminster M950 for £295. Ive also bought a Supernova chuck (£125 with free spigot jaws). The only thing for me is that weve just had a new baby and theres no chance of getting down the shed to use it currently.
Regards, MMD.
 

trevtheturner

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Hi Roohster,

Welcome.

In addition to the above, stick with the lathe you have for the time being, I would suggest.

When I wanted to start turning I spent a good while gleaning info. from anywhere and everywhere, but particularly from the 'professionals' at exhibitions and shows - extremely friendly and helpful fellows. Learned a lot about equipment before I started. Important tips included: yes, it can be, and for me is, addictive; buy the biggest and best lathe that you can manage within your budget - you can't beat quality and on a small lathe you can make small things, but on a large lathe you can make big things and still make the small things; don't try to amass a large collection of gouges/chisels/scrapers, etc. You can do almost anything with five good quality HSS basic tools to start with, then add to them only when you find you need to - you could otherwise unnecessarily spend a fortune on tools you don't need and rarely use. A decent grinder, preferably one designed for woodturning tools, is essential, as is the skill to be able to sharpen properly. If you do take to turning( :roll: ), before changing your lathe give some thought to variable speed facility (IMO worth its weight in gold), swivelling headstock, size of swing over lathe bed(i.e. the maximum diameter you can turn),outboard turning attachment, type of stand or bench you want it to sit on (I built mine to suit my height - important). My 'research' helped me a lot and, although my kit did add up to quite a few £££s, unusually for me I was quite patient, saved up a bit while I was 'researching' and, four years on, although I have added to it, I am still happy with what I started with!

Good luck with the new venture - be interested to hear how you get on.

MMD - many congratulations on the new arrival. All sleepless nights and mustard plasters at the moment, eh? :wink:

Cheers,

Trev.
 

jasonB

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I've got the Nu-tool version of the Axminster Perform CCL, it also comes badges as a Draper. I find it more than capable for what I want with the addition of an axminster chuck. The ease of speed change is an advantage so long as you keep the shaft from the motor well greased. It is not ideal for very intricate/detailed work but fine for bowls & spindle work.

Here are some of the things that I have made on it

http://photobucket.com/albums/v156/jaso ... 20turning/

As has been said above don't buy the cheap sets of tools, a few good quality ones, properly sharpened will make a lot of difference, just buy them as you need them, its no good getting tools for spindle work if you find you just want to turn bowls.

Jason
 
A

Anonymous

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Ive officially got the bug now....
Opinions on Axminster and Record lathes anyone?
 
G

Guest

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The price on the Axminster lathes is very good at the moment.I have the CCBL as I said earlier and am very happy with it.The record lathes seem to be very popular and well built but compared to the Perform they are expensive.They also require the belt to be changed manually except on the more expensive ones.
 
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