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Really stupid question about hand planes.

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Digit

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When I built the desk I'm working at. It has Pigeon holes made with 6 mil Iroko and I doubt that even you have a 6 mil bull nose plane!
Previous to that on a writing slope using 6 mil Beech.

Roy.
 

Jacob

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Yebbut were the chisel cut surfaces in sight? In any case you'd expect to get a reasonable surface in a long 6mm slot, with a chisel used carefully bevel down. Unless of course it has a micro bevel and is hollow ground! Not a good way to sharpen chisels for that very reason i.e. they don't work bevel down. Rounded bevel best here.
 

Digit

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Yebbut were the chisel cut surfaces in sight? In any case you'd expect to get a reasonable surface in a long 6mm slot, with a chisel used carefully bevel down. Unless of course it has a micro bevel and is hollow ground! Not a good way to sharpen chisels for that very reason i.e. they don't work bevel down. Rounded bevel best here.
Have you tried anything else?
With a 6 mill X 10 inch long chisel, bevel up, I get as good a finish as a bull nose plane. If you use a flat plate to support the chisel at the start depth is spot on. Then you can remove the plate and use the cut surface to maintain depth.
Be adventerous! Try something new. (Even if it's the wrong one! :twisted: )

Roy.
 

János

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Dear Roy,

This is the job the router planes were invented for: making consistent, flat-bottomed grooves/dadoes. Fast, repeatable, reliable.

Have a nice day,

János
 

Digit

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Don't have one! And I don't have one 'cos I normally cut grooves etc either with a TS or an electric router as they are easier to cut straight grooves with than the old type.

Roy.
 

Jacob

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Fair enough. But do you flatten and polish all your chisels? If not why not?
 

Jacob

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Well done Roy. Congratulations. One is all you really need.
Is it a set of one?
 

Digit

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No, I've got another one with a rounded bevel that I use for picking my nose! :twisted:

Roy.
 

No skills

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Well I never, learned something about lap joints reading all this. Funny all the little bits of knowledge you never get when you havent had any training lessons.
 

jimi43

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Digit":3blo23ge said:
When I built the desk I'm working at. It has Pigeon holes made with 6 mil Iroko and I doubt that even you have a 6 mil bull nose plane!
Previous to that on a writing slope using 6 mil Beech.

Roy.
Why not try the 043 Roy...it's a superb bit of kit and would cut a trench beautifully as I (and others) have observed...



Here we see three test slots made with different sized cutters and all perfect in depth and edge squareness....

An impressive tool and relatively cheap on FleaBay (now the rush is over! :mrgreen: )

Jim
 

Jeff Gorman

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Coming very very late into this discussion, may I point out that no matter how carefully the sole of a plane is flattened, the plane's body can deflect.

There's some evidence on my site at http://tinyurl.com/7oeqdez

Just how it affects its operation is one of those imponderables that I too can't get my head round.

Jeff
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David C

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Good point Jeff.

I recently did a little experiment with a test dial indicator and a magnetic stand. No firm conclusions, just that they flex more than one might think.

Best wishes,
David
 

Cheshirechappie

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Jeff Gorman":1p6euset said:
Coming very very late into this discussion, may I point out that no matter how carefully the sole of a plane is flattened, the plane's body can deflect.

There's some evidence on my site at http://tinyurl.com/7oeqdez

Just how it affects its operation is one of those imponderables that I too can't get my head round.

Jeff
http://www.amgron.clara.net
Absolutely right - I mentioned as much earlier in the thread. The nature of the deflection, and it's magnitude, will depend on how the plane is supported, and the nature of the loads applied to it.

For example - if you support a try plane at it's toe and heel, it will deflect downwards in the middle. If you hold it level by the handle, the toe and heel will droop. If you apply pressure at any point, you will deflect it at that point. How much? In woodworking terms, not very far - forget it.

Another factor is that wood also deflects. If you press a plane on an edge, the wood under the plane will compress, and will spring back when the plane pressure is removed. The degree to which this happens will depend on the exact piece of wood. In general, denser pieces will deflect less for a given applied load.

All this is pretty much of academic rather than practical interest. What matters to the practical woodworker is getting surfaces that are good enough, flat enough and straight enough (or with controlled lack-of-straightness for such jobs as edge-jointing boards) to do the job in hand. Measuring to tenths of a thou is pointless - most species of wood will expand and contract more than this in the climatic changes of an afternoon.

Just a thought for the shaving-measurers. Your measured shaving thickness may not match the change in dimension of your stock. You force a shaving through a very considerable change in shape by planing it off, and it may well change it's exact dimensions as a result (most of them curl up, for a start!). If you really, really want to know how much you're taking off, measure your stock before taking the shaving, then after. The rest of us will just make our components fit each other.
 

Pete Maddex

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Cheshirechappie":10q8ezur said:
Just a thought for the shaving-measurers. Your measured shaving thickness may not match the change in dimension of your stock. You force a shaving through a very considerable change in shape by planing it off, and it may well change it's exact dimensions as a result (most of them curl up, for a start!). If you really, really want to know how much you're taking off, measure your stock before taking the shaving, then after. The rest of us will just make our components fit each other.
We don't measure shavings to see how much we take off, just to see how well the plane peforms, so stop having a go at us.

Pete
 

Cheshirechappie

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Pete Maddex":3c4njt2r said:
Cheshirechappie":3c4njt2r said:
Just a thought for the shaving-measurers. Your measured shaving thickness may not match the change in dimension of your stock. You force a shaving through a very considerable change in shape by planing it off, and it may well change it's exact dimensions as a result (most of them curl up, for a start!). If you really, really want to know how much you're taking off, measure your stock before taking the shaving, then after. The rest of us will just make our components fit each other.
We don't measure shavings to see how much we take off, just to see how well the plane peforms, so stop having a go at us.

Pete
I'm not having a go, Pete. Just trying to point out that the important bit is the wood you're planing. The shaving is the waste. What matters is whether the components being planed fit together well or have a surface good enough for the intended purpose. The measure of the plane's performance is whether or not it produces good, true surfaces on the workpiece; the shaving is just waste.
 

Pete Maddex

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Why call us "shaving-measurers" then, we have enough to contend with from Jacob, don't need some one else stiring things up.

Pete
 
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