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Quite the barn find

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Dandan

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Hey all,
Long time no post but something happened yesterday that I thought I would share. I went to visit a friend of mine who said her dad might have some lengths of used timber that I could scavenge to help build a shed i'm planning, nothing exciting, just construction lumber that might be good enough to save me buying new.

Well the path to the spare lumber took us through her dad's polytunnel storage shed where amongst an eye watering collection of timbers and tools, I came across these:





Thats 5 piles of stickered Elm, all looks to be 6 quarter and everything is around 10 feet long and up to 2 and a half feet wide! It's been there for around 30 years apparently!
He's not interested in trying to sell it, but would happily give some away if I had a plan to use it, so what would you make from it? Will it be any good after 30 years? What is Elm like to work with?
Some of the boards have definitely been eaten and some look a little rotted but i'm sure there must be some solid stuff in there too.

I just wanted to share and get some information on the wood and what I could do with it, fire away!
 

bourbon

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If it has been stored like that for 30 years with battens between for air flow, It will be fine, Hard as nails, but fine to use. Mate of mine has some floorboards stored the same.
 

MikeG.

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Excellent find, although I'd be worried about the insect holes. Stored well, timber improves with age, so 30 years is an asset, not a liability. Provided, of course, that it was stored warm and dry. Elm is a beautiful timber, but not as stable as some. Those will make lovely tables, dressers and so on, but also delightful and very traditional floorboards if there are any inch boards.

Young Custard of this parish lives fairly close to you, and may well be interested in a board or two. Drop him a PM.
 

Rorschach

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If he isn't interested in selling it, and isn't using it. Why on earth is he storing that much wood? :shock:
 

Inspector

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Looks as though he liked ladders too. :)
What is stickered in the smaller, neat pile in the background of the first picture?

Pete
 

Bm101

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As Mike says, I'd drop Custard a pm.
Your man might well be nudged into a sale that would suit him if he has just been sat on it in a poly tunnel for so long he no longer thinks about it.

Might benefit all involved

(Kitchen table, built in benches and worktops to match if I was able.)
 

Sam R

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There is a phrase that springs to mind: you spawny get!

I see you're in the south so I would guess that it is common elm rather than wych elm. Easiest way to tell is the presence of green streaks indicate wych. Common/English a bit less stable but still a fine timber. Traditionally used for coffins, boat keels & chair seats but you could use if for any furniture really. A word of caution: furniture & longhorn beetle (woodworm) will go right through it, making no distinction between sap & heartwood as with some other species. The pores are large enough for the adult beetles to 'inject' the larvae without trouble. So it could all be firewood, it has happened.

Off topic but what route/crag are you on in profile pic?
 

Trevanion

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Ah, That woodpile has got Coronavirus, very dangerous! I can dispose of it free of charge f you'd like. 8)
 

sunnybob

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Elm used to be the preferred wood for coffins. Was he the local undertaker? :shock: 8)
 

Dandan

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Thanks for all the responses, i'm going to head back there soon to replace his planer blades for him and try to barter for a couple of pieces to make a dining table, i'll do as much investigating as I can while i'm there!

Rorschach":3coi3kdc said:
If he isn't interested in selling it, and isn't using it. Why on earth is he storing that much wood? :shock:
Judging by how much other stuff he has, I guess he just likes to hoard!

Inspector":3coi3kdc said:
What is stickered in the smaller, neat pile in the background of the first picture?
To be honest it was all very overwhelming so i'm not sure what that pile was

Sam R":3coi3kdc said:
Off topic but what route/crag are you on in profile pic?
Thanks for the info on the wood, I definitely need to get back and check it out for insect damage, it could all be firewood...

That picture is me on Local Hero in Margalef, Spain :)
 

woodbloke66

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Fantastic find, but the worms do like to munch it! It's a great timber to use, but you may find that much of it is unusable due to said worms...but you might get lucky and find some which is clear and free.
To illustrate the case in point, I went to Yandles last year and picked up a few boards of elm that looked promising but their woodshed is pretty dark so I missed the tell tale holes. It was only when I got home and examined them at length did I see the dreaded worm holes, so ALL the boards were binned.

In all, it was a £100 down the drain :( :(

Note to self; always take a torch when you visit Yandles - Rob
 
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