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Quick removal of hardwood

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DrPhill

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"Side Axe"? A hatchet with a single sided blade?

As for making a shave-horse, well its just another largish thing to create clutter. I may wind up going that route, but a hatchet might be a more versatile tool at this stage.
Lathe - maybe, but my sticks are longer than average four, maybe five or more foot. That would be an exceptional lathe?
 

Adam W.

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You'd be better off with a double beveled axe for small stuff like that.
 

DrPhill

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Thanks for the replies so far. Lots of learning for me here.... but more is always welcome. I am currently attracted to the simplicity of a smallish single tool (hand axe) as opposed to a (likely more efficient) setup with a shave-horse. I have a couple or three sticks to make/finish and then I likely would have no use for the shave horse/draw knife, as this is part of a de-cluttering exercise. A hatchet might still be use for log splitting, and takes up less room.
 

Jacob

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,........ hatchet I use for splitting is probably going to bounce off seasoned yew,......
Much much easier to shape it while it's green and unseasoned
 

Adam W.

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Yes, it's just a work holding device. If you screw an old saw blade on to the top jaws, it'll grab and the work will stay where it is.

You could even get fancy and cut slots in the saw blade and make it retractable for other work.

You'd need to grow a beard to make it work properly though.
 

Jacob

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"Side Axe"? A hatchet with a single sided blade?

As for making a shave-horse, well its just another largish thing to create clutter. I may wind up going that route, but a hatchet might be a more versatile tool at this stage.
Lathe - maybe, but my sticks are longer than average four, maybe five or more foot. That would be an exceptional lathe?
The machine for profiling long lengths, including round section rods, is the spindle moulder. Quite an easy thing to do though you'd have to square it up first, one way or another.
 

pe2dave

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Thanks for the suggestions Jacob. I have a draw knife but even though it is very sharp (flexcut) I cannot seem to drive it well enough to remove stock atte. any real speed. This is probably my poor technique.
I never thought of an axe - thugh the battered old hatchet I use for splitting is probably going to bounce off seasoned yew, and as for cormel wood.... Maybe I need to source a decent axe for the task if I go this route.
This is the video, note the axe shape? Hultafors make decent axes.

Meant for your job, a froe might be worth consideration?
 
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Adam W.

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This is the video, note the axe shape? Hultafors make decent axes.

Meant for your job, a froe might be worth consideration?
See how the Wetterlings double bevel axe @ 1:40 in that video makes that nice scalloped finish as the bevel pushes the edge out of the cut. The Norwegians have a historic herringbone finish called sprett-telgjing made with a double beveled axe which they used on visible hewn surfaces.

They did loads and loads of research into how to make it with a myriad of modern axes, but had overlooked that most rural carpenters were farmers too and would only have had one or two multi purpose axes and it was a double bevel axe which makes that pattern.


Sprett-teljing.jpg
 
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Paul t

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Could you get someone local with a lathe to rough turn them for you, maybe for a few beer tokens
(y):)
Depending on your location, I am a lathe Turner. My Coronet lathe would accept 3' or 900mm between centres. Have not done any spindle work for awhile though.
 

DrPhill

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Well I went and bought a hatchet. It does seem like a fun way to reduce the amount of wood ;). Thanks for that suggestion (Jacob I think). I will need some practice - and my muscles need some strengthening too.
Has anyone got advice on sharpening a hatchet (seriously, not wanting to start a war).
 

Adam W.

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Sharpen it with a file and a sanding block with emery paper .

Clamp it flat on the corner of a bench with the edge hanging over the bench.

Push diagonally away from the edge with the file and you won't cut yourself and wear a glove on the hand which is on the other end of the file to the handle.

Polish with the sanding block and emery paper.

That'll get it nice and sharp.
 

Jacob

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Or do it on an oil stone. Coarse and medium. Low down on a saw stool so you can put some force into it as you push it away and draw it sideways to get the whole edge.
 

DrPhill

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Thanks both.... I have an old oil stone, and also a waterstone. W&D I have up to 3000 grit. My files though fall into two categories: motley of junk or way too coarse.
The axe came sharp enough for now with a shiney cutting edge but looks rough elswhere, so I am just planning ahead. I am hoping that the hatchet holds its edge for a while.

I would never have thought of using a hatchet - so this is a big gain from the forum. I really like the fact that the action is between carving and chopping. I did stumble across some wicked looking adzes and wondered if they would be a good idea, but I think the hatchet action seems more natural.
 

DrPhill

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And another update:

I sharpened my old axe (as it is heavier) and used it to rough hew a thick (4-5") curved yew log into a straighter thinner (~2.5") log. Then used my new hatched to get the log straight but not completely smooth). I am pleased with how easy it was to remove the excess, and how quickly I was able to do it. This is the technique that I was looking for - simple fast and low-tech. So thanks again.

Now to plan the next stage.
 
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