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Puzzled..Pitch Pine or Nae?

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woodbloke66

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I don't normally do this, but I'm puzzled and would value your opinions. Many years ago (over thirty) I salvaged some timber off a beach, from which I subsequently made a blanket chest, which served us well over the decades.
I've just recently made another, so I broke up the original one and can't quite believe what I think I picked op off the beach all those years ago:

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It's definitely a softwood, but is extremely hard; it's difficult to make a mark in it with your thumb nail. It's a yellow/light orange colour and quite heavy; certainly much heavier that standard, good quality, joinery pine. It planes easily, but is very difficult to cut across the end grain. There's a faint whiff of resin when you hold it close to your hooter, but it's not an overpowering pine scent.

I think it's Pitch Pine but I'm really not sure...so what's the consensus opinion please? - Rob
 

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Trevanion

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I'm pretty sure it's Pitch Pine, you see in your first picture there's that weird bit with the small flecks (No idea what to call it) in the middle of the grain? You don't really get that with many other pines.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I was given some about twenty five years ago - door linings, 12" x 2", from an asylum built in c.1880.
When cut it smelled like the day it was felled - like someone had spilled the turpentine. The long grain looked much like the end grain in your picture. I've seen pitch pine since that hasn't been much like it - I wonder how much depends where it was grown?
 
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