Protecting an Adirondack Chair from the UK weather

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

alanwetherall

Established Member
Joined
12 Feb 2021
Messages
34
Reaction score
6
Location
corby
Chair (2).jpg
.

I have just finished my first proper woodworking project an American Adirondack chair from www.kingsfinewoodworking.com who also has an excellent you tube channel. He supplies comprehensive plans plus a 1-hour video explaining how to build the Adirondack chair.

Because it was my first attempt and I didn’t want to spend a lot of money in case I mucked up (Or lost interest) I made it from two lengths of 9” x 1 ¼” pine stock from my locals shed.

From the paper templates I bought I transferred them onto ¼” plywood so I could pass them around to anybody else who wanted to make them.

I made my own bandsaw (An upside-down bosch jigsaw with extended blades running in between two bearings), surprisingly it was very effective in cutting the curved 1 ¼ stock.

I finished the pine with some light oak stain but my question is. What do you recommend to protect it from the UK weather as it will outside all the time? I have always treated my outdoor furniture with basic decking oil which so far has been really effective but I don’t know if it will be effective on the softwood.

Many thanks

alan
 

Bigegg

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
11 Aug 2021
Messages
82
Reaction score
45
Location
Leeds, w.yorkshire
creosote is the only stuff that will actually work: permanantly, that is. Shame it's no longer legal (and would stain clothes).

Yearly coats of a decent polyurethane yacht varnish, and bring it inside in the winter/bad weather would be my recommendation
 

TRITON

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2014
Messages
2,358
Reaction score
1,451
Location
Sunny Glasgow
Pine isnt really the best choice for an outdoor timber, should really have been a hardwood.

As such I would use an oil based paint or varnish or even linseed oil.
 

Marky Essex

New member
Joined
12 Dec 2019
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
Location
Aberystwyth
creosote is the only stuff that will actually work: permanantly, that is. Shame it's no longer legal (and would stain clothes).

Yearly coats of a decent polyurethane yacht varnish, and bring it inside in the winter/bad weather would be my recommendation

It's still legal, I buy it regularly.
 

graduate_owner

Established Member
Joined
5 Aug 2012
Messages
2,110
Reaction score
18
Location
Llandeilo
We can buy the original creosote, but only in 5 gallon drums (around £60). Otherwise it is 1 gallon containers of creocote which is the safer alternative I believe.
 

mikej460

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
19 Jan 2019
Messages
1,389
Reaction score
1,007
Location
Daventry
If I were you I'd treat the softwood one as a test and make it again from iroko or similar hardwood, even then it would need annual treatment. I wouldn't advocate creosote for something you sit on, it's banned as it is carcinogenic.

Nice chair though 👍
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
22,931
Reaction score
2,783
Location
Derbyshire
Linseed oil paint. Brouns & Co Linseed Paint and Oil
Very easy to apply and very durable. I've got it on a slatted chair which has been out for two years now including through winter. Other external joinery 7 years so far. Goes a bit matt and chalky but stays firmly stuck on wood and metal. No primer or preparation needed except brush down for loose stuff etc
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
1,819
Reaction score
1,508
Location
Scotland
Get a cover for winter or move somewhere where it doesn't rain from October to March!
 

Bigegg

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
11 Aug 2021
Messages
82
Reaction score
45
Location
Leeds, w.yorkshire
If nothing else, stand the bottom of the legs in a diesel/motor oil mix, and or use a bitumen paint on the bottom inch.
Water gets into end grain much more easily than side grain, and that *should* stop the worst of it, without looking too rustic.
 

Lefley

Established Member
Joined
29 Oct 2020
Messages
286
Reaction score
541
Location
Canada
View attachment 116404 .

I have just finished my first proper woodworking project an American Adirondack chair from www.kingsfinewoodworking.com who also has an excellent you tube channel. He supplies comprehensive plans plus a 1-hour video explaining how to build the Adirondack chair.

Because it was my first attempt and I didn’t want to spend a lot of money in case I mucked up (Or lost interest) I made it from two lengths of 9” x 1 ¼” pine stock from my locals shed.

From the paper templates I bought I transferred them onto ¼” plywood so I could pass them around to anybody else who wanted to make them.

I made my own bandsaw (An upside-down bosch jigsaw with extended blades running in between two bearings), surprisingly it was very effective in cutting the curved 1 ¼ stock.

I finished the pine with some light oak stain but my question is. What do you recommend to protect it from the UK weather as it will outside all the time? I have always treated my outdoor furniture with basic decking oil which so far has been really effective but I don’t know if it will be effective on the softwood.

Many thanks

alan
Very ingenious on the bandsaw idea. Use what you have I say. I saw a great review on impact guns they did . They did every test possible including on sinking the most #crews, large bolts, etc etc. battery life. Dewalt came first, the cheapest, festool came dead last. People get caught up with getting the most expensive tools thinking there skills or something will improve. Using a jigsaw as a bandsaw just shows it’s the process that counts getting to the finish line. Not the tools you have.
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
22,931
Reaction score
2,783
Location
Derbyshire
Looks good but £125 for 2.5 litres? What is made from gold dust diluted with fairy tears?
Half a litre would do your Adirondack chair for many years to come. It goes on very thin and has high coverage. Needs no primer, preservative or undercoat. It also has very long shelf life. In the long run it's very economical.
I've been using this Linseed Oil Paint
 
Last edited:
Top