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Pressing Compressor questions

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tim

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I'm stuck!! :?

I've read the posts on HVLP vs standard compressors and normal guns and agree with most of the points made and also understand the comment about why buy a machine that can only spray (HVLP) - makes sense but.....

I'm only likely to use a compressor for a bit of dust blowing and brad nailing so can go in at the lower end of the market ie kitted out for £150ish. But if I want to do some spraying as well, I really need to up the compressor spec and obviously invest in a good gun - so now we're talking about £400 inc gun etc but that still isn't the kind of compressor that can run continuously to do large pieces of furniture plus they are pretty big and noisy. :(

So my question is although it would be slightly more expensive c£!50 more would I not be better buying a small compressor eg the Axminster £100 one plus brad nailer and an HVLP set up eg Fuji 3 stage rather than buying one big compressor that doesn't quite do the job needed?

....and then what happens if I want to use a vacuum press - do I need another competely different set up/compressor type machine? I'd rather invest in better equipment at the start rather than 'buy cheap, buy twice' but I am slightly perplexed by my options to say the least. :oops:

Lots of questions in one so apologies but any help or thoughts would be gratefully received.

Cheers

Tim
 

ike

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I've read the posts on HVLP vs standard compressors and normal guns and agree with most of the points made
Sounds encouraging so far...

But if I want to do some spraying as well,
...this is the crux of it, I think. Is it 'if' or 'I definitely'?,

- so now we're talking about £400 inc gun etc but that still isn't the kind of compressor that can run continuously to do large pieces of furniture plus they are pretty big and noisy.

Not necessarily so IMO (and I'll probably get shot down for saying it). I have an Axminster Extreme which is 9cfm FAD - OK for continuous use with a RP (Reduced Pressure) gun, (allowing for the fact that spraying most things is not usually a continuous trigger down operation anyway).

How big is 'big' for you?. Is a 50L tank too big? . I can pick the Extreme up and carry it. Granted it is fairly noisy, but you could enclose it to reduce the noise level.

So my question is although it would be slightly more expensive c£!50 more would I not be better buying a small compressor eg the Axminster £100 one plus brad nailer and an HVLP set up eg Fuji 3 stage rather than buying one big compressor that doesn't quite do the job needed?
And a tough question to boot!. But the Extreme can do the job although It mightn't supply enough air for some power tools - I think sanders have relatively high air consumption. Above 9cfm, most compressors go industrial rated and 3-phase due to 3hp+ power requirement. Except for one that I know of. It's an unusual design - the Axminster Extreme 4 which is a 4 cyl oil-less unit pumping 12cfm FAD - very high for a sub-3hp 1-phase compressor.

....and then what happens if I want to use a vacuum press - do I need another competely different set up/compressor type machine?
You'd need a completely different unit for a vacuum press i.e. a vacuum pump which does the opposite of a compressor.

Don't know if this helps in any way. I chewed over all this a while back and plonked for the compressor solution v. the HVLP route. I did already have a mini compressor/brad nailer combo though from B &Q. It is so handy for jobs around the house as well as sitting in the workshop.

cheers

Ike
 

Travis Byrne

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Tim
This may or may not be of help to you, but I will tell you my experences.
I also wanted to spray some of my pieces. I started with a 3hp 30 gal compressor. As I was spraying, I found myself waiting a little for the compressor to catch up. I thought if I had a bigger compressor that I wouldn't have to wait. I purchased a 6 1/2 hp-60 gal compressor. I still find that I take pauses to catch my breath and look over the area that I have sprayed just like I did when I used the smaller compressor. I could well have gotten by with the 3 hp-30 gal job. Unless you are spraying all the furniture in the house, 3hp -30gal will do the job.
I have 3 HVLP spray guns. some high dollar and some quite cheap. Once you get where you can adjust the guns, there is not a lot differance. Maybe if you were spraying a Roll Royce, then you want to move up. :D

I cannot recommend any brands for you as I don't know what is available
to you.
Once I started to use spray guns, I never looked back. I even spray some of my stain.
Good luck on your decision
Travis
 

tim

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Thanks guys. 50 l isn't too big - I would probably box it off anyway but in reality it isn't portable - which would be useful for both a spray system and a nailer. SO maybe thats what will determine the decision in the end. Two smaller separate units which can be moved with ease and do specific jobs appeals to me more than one lumbering noisy brute that pretty much has to stay in the workshop. I learned a long time ago that portable and moveable/liftable are not necessarily interchangeable. Certainly some of the 'portable' site work products are IMHO anything but! :?

I imagine that either way will ahve its benefits but I think I'm jsut going to have to call it. Anyway, I'm off to the show tomorow so if you see someone boring compressor and spray manufacturers to death - its me :lol:

Just one final thing on the vacuum bag - I know that a vacuum extractor is the opposite of a compressor but I'm sure that I have seen a piece of kit somewhere which converts a compressor into an extractor when attached to a vac bag, a bit like a drill pump. Any ideas?

Cheers

T
 

ike

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Tim wrote:

Just one final thing on the vacuum bag - I know that a vacuum extractor is the opposite of a compressor but I'm sure that I have seen a piece of kit somewhere which converts a compressor into an extractor when attached to a vac bag, a bit like a drill pump. Any ideas?
I'd forgotten about Venturi pumps. Have a lookhere (site slow to load).

cheers,

Ike
 

ike

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You beat me to it Neil. I think your link's more useful!

Ike
 

tim

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Thats great thanks. These adaptors look pretty good (and inexpensive) - is there a draw back ie why isn't this the norm?

T
 

ike

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is there a draw back ie why isn't this the norm?
The noise of all that air hissing somewhere? :?
 

Neil

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Hi Tim,

I think (or should I say I'm guessing :? ) that the Venturi-type systems can't achieve as low a pressure, also there may be some limit on bag size. Best person to ask is the forum's resident 'vacuum-bagging master' Steve Maskery :)

NeilCFD
 

Chris Knight

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Venturi systems can pull a good enough vacuum for a veneering job but they are on the whole a bit noisy (hissing plus the compressor cycling on on off contuinually for a couple of hours.

I prefer a vacuum pump which also runs continuously but with less noise overall.

Don't forget vacuum clamping - that is a very versatile use of a vacuum - either generated via a venturi system of with a pump. You can make up all sorts of sizes and shapes to hold stuff for routing and whatnot.
 
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