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Preserving Planes

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Waka

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Unfortunately I've got to return to the world called to workplace, very disappointed because I'm still playing and learning about my new toys, so much so that this morning to arms and shoulders are a little tender.

To the point, I am going to be away for month and wnat to know what I should cover the babies with. I thought of using PTFE spray, only because thats what I have in the WS.

Can anybody come up with any suggestions on what I should use

Cheers

Waka
 

Alf

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Waka,

Wrenched away from them so soon? Oh, the tragedy. :( Best way to preserve them is in a cardboard box addressed to Mad Tool Person, PO Box 164, Cornwall of course, but there are other ways too. L-N use camelia oil to preserve 'em in their packing, so that's gotta be recommendation #1. If you have any paste wax skulling about the w'shop that'll do too. Wipe it on, leave it for a minute or two and then buff. If you can stick 'em in a wooden drawer or box, that's good too, and wrapping them up in the anti-rust paper they came in, of course. I would say "It's the summer, so rust won't be a problem", but that'd just be plain daft... :roll: PTFE is a lubricant isn't it? Not sure it has any protective qualities :?

Cheers, Alf
 

Philly

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Waka,
I use camelia oil on mine, but until you can get your hands on some do this: Wipe the bare metal over with a rag dipped in some 3-in-1. That will keep them rust free til your return. And of course, bring them into the house and store them in the dry. (Her indoors won't mind at all :lol: )
regards,
Philly :D
 

ike

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I use ordinary furniture wax on chisels, blades and the like. But I find that it's fiddly to apply thoroughly on more intricate tools such as planes. For palnes I use a rust preventative spray from Screwfix (the orange/brown spraycan). I believe (tell me I'm wrong) that stuff like WD-40 etc does not leave much of a waxy film after the solvent has evaporated so you don't get long term protection. I bought a Clico 3 in 1 shoulder/chisel/bullnose plane a couple years back and the Screwfix stuff has stopped any rust.

Another very effective solution is to wrap your most precious tools in vapour paper - Axminster sell it I know - and apparently it lasts a long time like at least a year if not 2.
 

Johnboy

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My other hobby is clay pigeon shooting and any gun shop will sell you a variety of rust inhibitors. Napier make an impregnated cloth to put in a gun cabinet which give off a vapour to stop corrosion. I can't see any reason why it wouldn't work in a tool box. Go to http://www.chambersgunmakers.co.uk/Lubricants.htm
and scroll down to the Napier products.

john
 

Philly

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Hi All,
I wouldn't recommend WD-40 as a long term solution-it evaporates, disolving oils, grease and wax. So after a few weeks it can leave them less protected than before you sprayed them. 3-in-1 oil doesn't evaporate (at least not at a rate like wd does), and all it takes is a quick wipe with a clean cloth to remove. I have used this method for a couple of years, and have had no problem with oil transfering to the workpiece-so no finishing problems.
Cheers,
Philly :D
 
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Waka
I use camelia oil and got it from Axminster. Lasts for years as you only need to spray a small amount now and again

It has no odour at all which is very nice indeed

Cheers

Tony
 

Waka

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Thanks all,

Camelia oil seems to be the favourate; wonder if HID's would like a country car ride to Axminster tomorrow?

Waka
 

Pete W

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Philly":3lo1e997 said:
Hi All,
I wouldn't recommend WD-40 as a long term solution-it evaporates, disolving oils, grease and wax. So after a few weeks it can leave them less protected than before you sprayed them.
I'm not disagreeing, but I thought I'd mention that the makers of WD40 (who also make 3-in-1 by the way) explicitly state the following:
1. WD40 was designed as an anti-rust protector.
2. Long-term protection against rust is one of the key properties of WD40.
3. Even when it evaporates, it leaves behind protective elements to combat rust.

I've never had any problems with it myself.
 

Bean

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Waka
I'm not sure where I have seen them but, plastic bags witch give off VOC's to protect bare metals inside them from corrosion are availiable, Its just a pity I cannot remember where I have seen them :oops:

Bean
 

Philly

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Pete,
Yeah, they do claim that for WD. The company I work for do maintenance for high street chains. A fair percentage of our work is replacing locks, hinges, hardware that has been sprayed with WD to loosen them up. It makes a big difference immediatley, but any grease or oil is dissolved by the WD. The part then fails considerably quicker, thanks to the wonders of WD-40.
It does have a place, i.e. loosening rusted bolts, starting damp engines, etc. and I doubt it will actually harm your planes, but if you have some machine oil on the shelf as well as WD, go for the machine oil-especially if you will be storing the tools for a period of time.
I hope this is of help,
Philly :D
 
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