• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Power Tools From the USA

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Charley

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2002
Messages
2,072
Reaction score
7
Location
Collingham
I've noticed a few members mentioning buying routers from across the pond and with the current dollar rates as they are I thought I'd price one up.

The only concern I have is if it'll work with our voltage and it seems the answer is yes although you'll loose abit of the speed/RPM.

The only USA to UK transformer I have is a small travel one but I doubt that'll do the job so I've been looking here - http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/ ... index.html and according to them for a 120v, 11amp router I'll need a 1320VA transformer that costs £90. Now I find that abit steep and can't believe that everyone uses one so I'm wondering how everyone else gets around the voltage problem?
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Neil,

Sorry to disappoint you but must of what you have pointed to does not have the mussel to run a router :x They are only for DVD players or radio type equipment.

Charley ,

Now for some better news! Look at 110volt site transformers, in the new Screwfix catalogue they have a 3kVA transformer for £53.42. You would a plug at £1.20, a short piece of heavy duty flex and an american socket and you should be in business. :lol:

One transformer could of course be used for a number of different tools, just use the setup like an extension lead. 8)
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi Dave

DaveL":244a1xdl said:
Neil, Sorry to disappoint you but most of what you have pointed to does not have the muscle to run a router
I thought it was too good to be true. :cry:

Sorry Charley.

Cheers
Neil
 

SquareCircle

Established Member
Joined
17 Jan 2004
Messages
53
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
Charley

Took the plunge last week and added a router to a long anticipated Leigh D4 from woodcraft.com. Further 10% off for one day swung it for me. Prior research on US speced tools on a UK 110 V transformer indicates that it’ll run a little hot at 5/6 speed, but should go on forever. So long as it does not have an induction motor. Most hand tools don’t. Since I already had a 3.3 kva transformer in the shed, then it was a no-brainer really. Sorry UK Plc.
Kit should be here within the next couple of weeks, let you know how it goes.
 

Cutting Crew

Established Member
Joined
5 Sep 2003
Messages
283
Reaction score
0
Location
Chesterfield, Derbyshire
Hi all,

Did you check out the possibility of added costs when buying in from the US? The dreaded VAT, import duties and so on.

Whenever I get tools sent over from the US for review or testing I always have to pay the delivery company, whoever it is a number of charges, these go to HM Customs & Excise until I return the tools to the US, when I get a refund.

CC
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
i've got loads of tools from the USA

all i do is spend a lilltle time doing the research here and then when someone i know is travelling from there to here i order on line and get it delivered to where they are going to be and they just put it in their luggage.

easy
 

kityuser

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Messages
1,108
Reaction score
0
charley, a site transformer will most certainly be the way to go, I`ve seen LOADS of them at bootfairs so if the 60 quid jobbie from screwfix is too much...........

surley waiting until a mate goes to `merical and putting a power tool in his case to bring back is a bit risky :? what if he gets caught by customs? you would`nt be very popular :shock:

I know the dollar is weak at the moment, but once you paid VAT and air-fare is the price difference really THAT MUCH (i.e. doing it LEGALLY)
 

Charley

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2002
Messages
2,072
Reaction score
7
Location
Collingham
No problem Neil, thanks anyway.

So the 110volt site transformer will work with a 120volt router? Do I need a US socket or can I just cut off the router plug and stick a 3.3 kva 110volt plug on the end?

I've allowed for Vat and import duty to the price so shipping it across isn't a problem. I've also got a sister who works over there so if need be I can send it back with her.

Thanks for all your help everyone :)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
A word of warning to those of you thinking about bringing stuff over from the US when you/a mate travel. Electrical equipment should ALWAYS go in your carry on bag, as cables and metal/plastic housings are going to freak out the x-ray guy. Unless you want your bag removed and destroyed by the bomb squad that is. BUT if you pack a router for example in your carry-on bag for goodness sake dont have any cutters with you!!!!!!!!!!

Considering I had to put my shoes through the machine last Autumn when checking in at Dallas coming home from a staff meeting, a brand new power tool in a box is bound to arouse suspicion. If you're trying to avoid the VAT or other duty it only takes one jobsworth to really spoil your day!!!!!!!
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Charley":3rzom022 said:
Do I need a US socket or can I just cut off the router plug and stick a 3.3 kva 110volt plug on the end?
You can do that, but if you have more than one USA power tool you will need to do it for each one. If you make the adaptor lead, you only need one 8)

Note to Alf,
that is my Dutch Jew ancestry showing through :lol:
 

Dewy

Established Member
Joined
11 Jan 2004
Messages
602
Reaction score
0
Location
Gloucester
This topic has been flogged to death on the Screwfix forum
Add import duty etc then the fact that US current is 50 cycles as opposed to our 60 cycles & you have problems.
Many have found in the past that what looked like a bargain was more expensive in the end.
 

WOLF

Member
Joined
11 Mar 2004
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
KENT
well done dewy, and other sfx memeber tell the guys and girls here that what they are doing is extremely dangerous.. as like dewy points out.. the voltage as well as the cycle rate is differnet.. not only will you kill off early your machinery you risk the fact that you may just kill your self.. and all to save a few bob!!!! :cry:
 

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,489
Reaction score
7
Location
Weymouth
Charlie

Having lived in Canada for a few years back in the 90's most of my tools are 11 :lol: 0v including table saw, pedestral drill, routers etc. I run all of these off the screw fix transformer and have had no problems what so ever. :lol:

You have a choice of buying the 110v plug from screw fix and attaching this to the tool and then connecting direct to the transformer, or put in a 110v ring main as I have.

I have to admit even with the likes of VAT it works out a lot cheaper than in the UK, an example is the Mikita sliding compund saw, I think priced in the UK for about 600.00 pounds, I got mine in Canada for less than $600 with an exchange rate of 2.5:1. I know this is a bit big for hand luggage but it give you an idea.

A company you could deal with for smaller items are the likes of Leigh Valley Tools, if I remember correctly they post direct from Canada. Worth checking out the price difference. Don;t forget to put .ca at the end of their website address.

Another thing I brought back was an aray of 110v extention leads with US/Canada fittings, might have a spare if your interested. :?:

All in all all tools on the other side of the pond are very much cheaper than in good old blighty and this includes top brands.

Cheers

Waka
 
G

Guest

Guest
I tried to order some small items from Lee Valley.No problem ordering but shipping costs were crippling.For three small items(a router bit and two flat measureing tapes) it would have cost more to ship them than the value of the items,even by surface mail.
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
To anyone out there considering buying 110 volt tools from the US DON'T

If you buy a tool at even half price you will then have to pay VAT and import duty and shipping so the saving is a lot less than it seems.

You will pay good money for a tool and when it fails as machines that are made to work on 60Hz do not like 50Hz you will have completely stuffed any warranty.

A machine designed for 60Hz will run at a different speed when supplied with 50hz with all sorts of safety and quality issues.

The only exception with buying from the US is with cordless, because you can throw away the US charger and buy a UK one which may make it worthwhile; but if it's faulty or been damaged in transit are you prepared for all the hassle of sending it back?.

Keith
 

Waka

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Mar 2004
Messages
4,489
Reaction score
7
Location
Weymouth
Keith

You are correct regarding different speeds 60Hz against 50Hz. My 110 volt 60Hz machinery has given me good service for the last 5 years. warrenties well over due. Should it now start to go wrong, then a motor change is in order.

I don't know what the decrease in speed is but I have to admit I don't notice it and as for performance it seems to give me the same here as it did in Canada.

WQas lucky with all mine because shipping was free and vat not an issue (it was past its vat date)


Interested if anyone knows the decrease in speed and any definate safety problems.

Cheers Waka
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
Waka, you already had this equipment and decided to bring it with you from Canada so your position is different, but to buy new 110v 60Hz equipment and use it in the UK is very unwise for the reasons I previously posted.

Before turning to woodwork 20 years ago I was an electronics engineer, motors can be designed to run with a certain frequency of supply, by reducing the frequency you are possibly operating them outside their design parameters, why take the risk?

Keith
 
Top