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L2wis

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Hi all, I've recently been looking at a bandsaw for my shed however I'm not sure one would really fit. Would a Sliding mitre be a viable alternative?

Something like this: http://www.wickes.co.uk/invt/200363

I want to use it for bowl and pen prep along with generally woodwork and possible some crude box making.

oh and possibly segment turning in the future.
 

gerrybhoy70

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Hi Lewis,

I don't have a bandsaw either, due to space limitations & use a sliding mitre instead.
It works to a certain point for cutting blanks, main point being you're restricted by the throat size for cutting anything much more than around 4-5" at best.

Still, so far I've had no issues with using it, other than the lack of maneouverability.
For smaller, thinner pieces I use a scrollsaw with a 3" throat on it and just take my time.

As for using it for general woodwork/boxmaking, I couldn't do without mine.

Hope this helps.

btw - nice piece of work on your competition bowl.
Looks really well made & finished.
 

jumps

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if you can fit one of those in working configuration, you can fit a bandsaw.............................................

so what's the real question?

they really do different jobs - or put another way they have different limiting factors - think about these; bandsaw cuts along the length as well as across, mitre only across. bandsaw can cut straight and curve, mitre straight only. depth of cut is machine specific - but I would expect the bandsaw to go deeper at any given price point. bandsaw needs to be tuned to get the best out of it - mitre comes out the box (normally).

I have a normal (250mm) mitre, table saw and (relatively small but powerfull) band saw - the latter gets all the general in small 'shop use as well as the bits only it can handle.
 

L2wis

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Thanks for both your replies chaps, the two wheel bandsaws are relatively tall in comparison to a mitre and the device which ever it be is going to be bench mounted in my shed so I've got limited head space. I have however spotted you can get 3 wheel bandsaws which are much smaller and might fit my shed better!

I guess i liked the idea of a sliding mitre for when I try my hand at some segment turning, which i know i can still do with care on a bandsaw but just not as easily.

Regarding 3 wheel bandsaws, does anyone have any recommendations or opinions on such devices?

Thanks for the compliments Gerry! I'm really impressed at how well yours is finished with beeswax, i've been struggling with beeswax for a while now... Can't seem to get a decent enough finish with the stuff.
 

gerrybhoy70

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Hi Lewis,

Thanks - to be honest it looks better in the photo's than in fron to of me. lol
The downside of beeswax is it messes up pretty easy with handling, so I'm going to coat it with a clear food-safe varnish as well just to protect it.

I had trouble getting to grips with beeswax to begin with, but found a way that works for me.
1. Once I've done all my sanding I apply 2 coats of shellac sanding sealer and cut them both back with 0000 wire wool.
2. I apply the beeswax with tissue with the lathe stopped, leave it a minute or two then buff it off with a clean piece of tissue while the lathe is running at approx 2500rpm.
3. Another 1-2 minute wait and cut back with 0000 and repeat 2 & 3 til I'm happy with it.
4. Apply clear food safe varnish with a brush while lathe is stopped, allow a few minutes to dry off, run lathe at high speed again and buff off with clean tissue.
5. Cut back with 0000, and repeat 4 & 5 til the overall finish is where I want it (remembering not to cut back the final coat!! lol)

If you find this works for you, great. If not, there's always a way for everyone and I'd be interested to know how you get there.
 

RogerP

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L2wis":35ud15op said:
.......
Regarding 3 wheel bandsaws, does anyone have any recommendations or opinions on such devices?
Compare to a two-wheel bandsaw: the throat is larger, depth of cut usually less and the blades are easier to break. Never, ever broken a two-wheeled saw blade but I did when I had a three-wheeler. :oops:
 

L2wis

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humm yeah I've read that having 3 wheels can place more stress on the blade. I'll do some measuring tonight to see what height I can have on my bench max, then i'll know what route to go down I guess!

Thanks for logging your beeswax application for me Gerry! I dislike the softness of the finish also as you mentioned once handled it's not so great.
 

Silverbirch

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I have a Record BS300 bandsaw, which I suppose would be classed as medium sized, and it only stands 5ft6 high on its stand. It cuts bowl blanks, small logs and spindles as well as being useful for many other general woodworking tasks. It's footprint is little bigger than that of my mitre saw, though admittedly, it wouldn't sit on a bench. I don't do segmented work, but if I am understanding the link in Chas's thread correctly, he is using a bandsaw before disc sanding to precise dimensions. Also, a mitre saw,as mentioned, is for cross grain cutting and much segmented work would involve cutting with the grain.
Just my thoughts.

Ian
 

gerrybhoy70

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No worries Lewis.

You're right about the finish being very soft. Can also sometimes feel a bit greasy if it's not been buffed quite long enough.
The addition of the varnish gives it a nice hard shell, with 3 or 4 coats normally being enough for my liking.

Others will have there own preferred ways of doing this, and I'm always looking for new ways to finish work.

Anyone with any suggestions, don't be shy - I need all the help I can get!! lol.
 

L2wis

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Thanks for the input silverbirch, I would like the ability to cut cross and along grain so another vote for the bandsaw.

@Gerry: Have you tried a friction polish? I believe I only did one or 2 coats on my competition bowl and it's dead simple to do! Pretty durable also!
 

tudormaker

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Got lost there two topics in one, still it dosn't take much to get me lost and in a spin, could be an age thing.

Terry
 

jumps

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whilst I have no doubt the Jet unit is excellent for what it is, I think these are quite different machines in terms of capability.

I am sure that between you and Devonwoody you would be able to resolve the transport somehow - it's what couriers do!

I have a similar sized machine, mounted on an old bedside table with locking casters - so I move it around as appropriate. Mind you my lathe is also on large lockable casters, as is flip saw...
 

L2wis

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I'd rather deal with someone in person, also I'm not sure I'd trust couriers with a band saw after my recent experiences with them!
 
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