Post a photo of the last thing you made

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Stigmorgan

Established Member
Joined
18 Aug 2019
Messages
924
Reaction score
1,516
Location
Ash Vale, Aldershot
Been looking at a crotch piece of Hawthorn for ages, wasn't sure it would turn as it had cracks all over the place but today I felt daring so decided to put it between centres and round it off, once rounded the cracks weren't so bad so I turned a tenon and got to work. Sanding was a painful nightmare but I got there and finished it with walnut oil, I absolutely love the warm glow Hawthorn gets when finished.
20220626_154427.jpg
20220626_154441.jpg
20220626_154448.jpg
20220626_154458.jpg
20220626_154508.jpg
20220626_154517.jpg
20220626_154525.jpg
 

David with splinters

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 May 2022
Messages
22
Reaction score
140
Location
Maidstone
My daughter is partially sighted and struggles to see where surfaces start and finish. It’s a problem when she’s cooking because she sometimes puts hot saucepans down a bit hard and splashes herself. Quite dangerous. There are various cooking aids you can buy from the RNIB and others but they’re pretty ugly so I have been experimenting with different colours and shapes to help her boundary definition. These trivets really work well and look pretty nice to. Not all disability aids need to look clunky and horrible.

took bloomin ages to make though!
 

Attachments

  • 28B788EF-8A2F-4830-A321-B069B33D0A60.jpeg
    28B788EF-8A2F-4830-A321-B069B33D0A60.jpeg
    135.1 KB · Views: 0

gog64

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
19 May 2018
Messages
296
Reaction score
202
Location
Nowhere
My daughter is partially sighted and struggles to see where surfaces start and finish. It’s a problem when she’s cooking because she sometimes puts hot saucepans down a bit hard and splashes herself. Quite dangerous. There are various cooking aids you can buy from the RNIB and others but they’re pretty ugly so I have been experimenting with different colours and shapes to help her boundary definition. These trivets really work well and look pretty nice to. Not all disability aids need to look clunky and horrible.

took bloomin ages to make though!

Very nice, I can see there’s a lot of work involved. A real labour of love!
 

gog64

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
19 May 2018
Messages
296
Reaction score
202
Location
Nowhere
Here’s my workbench. Beech with dowelled joints and darkwood inlay. I’ve another vice going spare if anyone might be interested.

That’s fantastic, but I’d be terrified to use it! Most of my recent “woodwork” has either been templates that have ended up very charred or has involved very many nails fired out of a gun. I suspect we’re at different ends of the woodworking spectrum!
 

Fred48

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2021
Messages
53
Reaction score
35
Location
Cheshire

Sirenity

Established Member
Joined
28 Jul 2021
Messages
27
Reaction score
28
Location
Coventry
My daughter is partially sighted and struggles to see where surfaces start and finish. It’s a problem when she’s cooking because she sometimes puts hot saucepans down a bit hard and splashes herself. Quite dangerous. There are various cooking aids you can buy from the RNIB and others but they’re pretty ugly so I have been experimenting with different colours and shapes to help her boundary definition. These trivets really work well and look pretty nice to. Not all disability aids need to look clunky and horrible.

took bloomin ages to make though!
Wow blooming beautiful. As a person with a disability I can’t agree more heartily re the asthetics of aids. I went a long time without bath handrails until I found some beautiful ones.
I’m about to mod my new wheelchair, I wouldn’t drive wheels that looked ugly on the road, why do so on the pavement?
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,961
Reaction score
1,051
Location
Aberdeen

dzj

Established Member
Joined
29 Jan 2013
Messages
1,502
Reaction score
1,641
Location
Serbia
Very nice!

What prep / finish did you use?

Cheers James
I'm guessing the original finish was BLO/ shellac... something of that sort.
It was easy to remove with a card scraper, particularly as it was non existent in many places.
And the parts were all disassembled easily and that made sanding very simple.
I was egging on the clients towards a similar finish, but they wouldn't be persuaded.
I ended up using a usual sanding sealer/ dye/ matt PU varnish.
The sealer and varnish I sprayed, while the dye was wiped on with a rag.
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
1,821
Reaction score
1,512
Location
Scotland
I've seen wooden guides, but this was another useful design on the 3D printer. I made a set of guides for sharpening my planer blades. I couldn't be bothered waiting years to print the maximum size on my printer, so I just tried 3off 10mm thick guides. I wasn't sure if they would be rigid enough, but it worked a lot better than I thought. I normally just hand sharpen on a diamond plate, but the clamp made it so much easier to take more material off where the blade is damaged. The blades now leave a lovely finish on the wood, so very pleased. I have blades with 40 deg. and 30 deg. angles, so I can make any angle I want. I could also put a micro bevel on the blade by using a different angle.

IMG_6066.JPG



IMG_6065.JPG
 

Latest posts

Top