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Lefley

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My latest bass build.. Black Limba body (chambered) with English Walnut top, Maple neck and Ebony fretboard.






I'm no musician by any means, but aren’t guitars suppose to have 6 strings. Obviously I’m mistaken. What is the advantage to 5 strings. I can see one or two strings, then I could play it, but 5 vs 6 has me thinking!


I'm no musician by any means, but aren’t guitars suppose to have 6 strings. Obviously I’m mistaken. What is the advantage to 5 strings. I can see one or two strings, then I could play it, but 5 vs 6 has me thinking!

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I'm no musician by any means, but aren’t guitars suppose to have 6 strings. Obviously I’m mistaken. What is the advantage to 5 strings. I can see one or two strings, then I could play it, but 5 vs 6 has me thinking!
 

Stigmorgan

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The number of strings relates to the number of cords available, more strings = more cords/notes it can be as few as 3 or 4, or as many as 12, depends on the individual artists requirements, exactly the same as some pianos have more keys than others.
 

Sporky McGuffin

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Also that's a bass. They traditionally have four strings. Five usually goes lower, but can go higher for more chordal/melodic work. As a gross oversimplification.
 
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Simo

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As Sporky mentioned, it is indeed a bass.. so although the traditional 4 string is still the most popular choice, 5 (or more) strings are very common these days. This particular bass is tuned to standard, so the same as 4 string (E,A,D,G) but with a low B string added.
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
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First time making sliding dovetails with the router table... Not perfect, but the mistakes are hidden :cool:

It's a small (18 x 14 cm) shelf for a friend for her pot plant...

View attachment 126927View attachment 126928View attachment 126929View attachment 126930

Just needs a sanding, and she wants it stained white, so that's the next steps before installing on Sunday.
nice one. Always good to push yourself to try new things with the tools you have and add a useful feather to your hat or what ever the saying is . Did you use a straight bit first and then use the dovetail to refine the shape or just go with the dovetail bit in one go? I can't tell from the photo, does the dovetail narrow as it goes forward or is it parallel sides?
 

NickVanBeest

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nice one. Always good to push yourself to try new things with the tools you have and add a useful feather to your hat or what ever the saying is . Did you use a straight bit first and then use the dovetail to refine the shape or just go with the dovetail bit in one go? I can't tell from the photo, does the dovetail narrow as it goes forward or is it parallel sides?
Yes, straight bit first, and no, no tapering :cool:
 

kinverkid

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I've made quite a few of these drinks stands for fellow campers. This last two are made from what I think might be Douglas Fir. Reclaimed from stair treads from a Victorian house conversion. The third photograph is one I made last year. I added it because I didn't think to photograph the others with drinks props.P1070083.jpgP1070092.jpgP1000708 (2).JPG
 

Droogs

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well made @kinverkid Did you use metal hinges rather than make wooden ones just out of concerns over durability or for some other reason? And are the pointy bits just wood or do they have metal covers or pins?
 

kinverkid

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well made @kinverkid Did you use metal hinges rather than make wooden ones just out of concerns over durability or for some other reason? And are the pointy bits just wood or do they have metal covers or pins?
Thank you. It is because of durability. I now make the hinges from scratch with my cheap welder and brass rod for the peg. I know these often get left outside in all weathers so the metal ones stand up to the elements better. The one spike is a sharpening steel and the other is a long drill bit that had an extension braised to it by a previous owner. I sharpened them both to points and epoxy glued them in. The bottle openers I buy in packs of five.

Gary
 

Lefley

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Thank you. It is because of durability. I now make the hinges from scratch with my cheap welder and brass rod for the peg. I know these often get left outside in all weathers so the metal ones stand up to the elements better. The one spike is a sharpening steel and the other is a long drill bit that had an extension braised to it by a previous owner. I sharpened them both to points and epoxy glued them in. The bottle openers I buy in packs of five.

Gary
That's a beautiful salad bowl. What wood is it?
big leaf maple Burl
 

pulleyt

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I was asked by my son to hang a new dartboard in his flat. He'd also bought a surround to catch the odd stray dart and was hoping the two items could go on one of the doors in his hallway, the only choice of where to hang the board in the flat. However, this would have put it a good 200 mm below regulation height. So I offered to make a pack-away stand - with lighting.

In an effort to keep costs down it's made from 2 x 4 CLS that I converted into 38 x 25 mm battens, a piece of 9mm MDF and cheap piano hinges.
This is it packed away for storage (1350 × 750 x 80mm).

Resize_20220115_180524_4745.jpg


And unfolded it looks like this.

Resize_20220115_180524_4065.jpg


The lights are USB rechargeable as there isn't a convenient mains point in the hallway and are mounted on short battens that bolt into the top corners of the backing board.
 
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