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Mick p

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A good friend gave me 8 pieces of shapele 12 inch square x 3 thick really boring turning it as not much graining I finished it with 3 coats of danish oil left to dry then denibbed between coats and finished with 3 coats of Hampshire sheen gloss finishing wax that made the grain pop and happy with the results
 

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Terrytpot

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sorry to say but that seems like a really really bad idea beautifully exicuted.

There are good reasons why every bandsaw I ever seen or heard of has guide blocks under the table, they allow sawdust to drop through the table and for it to drop away or for a little to accumulate on the blocks without effecting the cut.

What problems are they going to solve?
You’ll not like this one either then?
 

TomW

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Weekend project.

Plant stand, oak, little dovetails and a half lap in the middle. Aim was to have it be all joinery and no fixings.

Made to match our living room furniture and the wax/linseed finish seems to have done a decent job.

Got the bits cut to do a second one as well to replace one out of shot I made out of pine and has some nails (shock horror) holding it together 😅

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TRITON

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Lots of workshop sorting out at the mo. After figuring out how to sharpen the chisels, and picking up a couple of extra sizes, the morticer is now firmly in service. Not a full rebuild but broken down into parts, derusted, degreased, and desawdusted, and rebuilt. Works well, and will do 19mm mortices in oak without too much effort.
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I'm sorry but you're never going to win any design awards with that skateboard ;)
 

Fitzroy

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I bought a dozen oak sleepers about 8 yrs ago to make raised beds. I made one and then realised we’re not really the gardening type. They are nice and dry now, and some rather split, but it’s not too hard to get some usable timber out of them. Going to turn them into some garden seating, first seat made. 28 mortices in one seat, morticer is going to earn its keep.
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Doug B

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You’ll not like this one either then?
That’s really nicely made thanks for sharing, I cut my support blocks so they aren’t in front of the gullet & the slot was milled with a 1/4” cutter so as to give plenty of clearance for debris.
Cutting the slot with the bandsaw blade like in the video & having the blocks either side of the gullet may cause a bit of restriction but to be fair I used a solid plywood disc with a bandsaw cut for the slot for years without problem.
 

D_W

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Someone on the US forums goes on at length about seaton chest chisels and the lack of a need for bevels because of how thin they are, so I figured I'd make some. Though I ended up so far not dead copying the seaton chest chisels, and I don't think I will (they have longer necks and bigger facets - I may change that later, and the all steel chisels are probably closer on average to a tip thickness of 0.5-0.7" - these are .08" at the top of the bevel. It doesn't sound like much, but .05 is lots thinner - I'm just a little lazy right now about grinding them, but my grinding setup is a post-heat-treat grind, so there's no reason these can't just be ground thinner as is.

I got the seaton chest book (Which wasn't available here, but thanks to wonderful Taths, I ignored the request to buy the book domestically and bought it anyway, and it took a little bit of time to get it and I figured I'd hear back that they figured out that I was in the US - but instead, the book arrived with a by no means needed apology that covid had made things a bit slow).

Long story short, there are some chisels in the book that do have small bevels ground on them, so these have the same (I just like them better with, no matter how thin they are).

The bevels will be cleaned up and they'll all be shallow in the end to take advantage of the buffer making a superior edge ahead of a shallow bevel.

The handles are apple, which isn't that easy to get here. A quick coat of linseed oil and wax. It's so close to the color of cherry, which is a color that I favor for some reason - it's a color with life in it, not gray and dead looking, not bright white with clear WB finish, not purple or blue, etc.

There will be six of these when I'm done. They are for me, as are a lot of the chisels that I post - this kind of obsessive chisel making would be less fun if it was a business.

Interestingly, the best way I've found to make these kinds of handles is to use the sander to do the rough work and then not the fine work (i hate sanding, but my grinding setup is two decent sanders and some wheel grinders - I noticed all of the nice guys do their rough shaping of handles - and some do finishing - with sanders). After the sander, just clean up and final size with a nicholson super shear and a mill file (no final sanding - I hate final sanding).

They are 26c3 steel like many of the recent chisels - a very classic feeling steel as there's no free alloying other than carbon roaming around in the iron (At least nothing noticeable). There's a small bit of manganese and chromium for hardenability but at least on the chromium side it's a fraction of a percent and it ends up in the iron carbides instead of becoming free roaming chromium carbides).

The small gap between the handle and bolster will close with not much use, and the pillowing filed on to the top of the handles could be more perfect, but it's nice to make things quick and not quite so prissy.

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Fanous

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I've made myself a bench! And I can confirm doing so without one is a challange...

Southern yellow pine for most of it, oak dowel and wedges, nothern poplar vice block (I grabbed the first suitable size wood I had at hand). Bench can be knocked down into smaller parts that would fit in a car. Later on, I will make the piece for tools that will fit in the top gap, and I have some orders on the way to drill holes for dogs and holdfasts.

Bench will remain untreated, as I don't see this as a beauty furniture, but a functional jig, so I'm going for high friction, low looks.

It's pretty much my first major wood build, and I'm pretty happy with the results! Started my woodworking journey a year ago. Many lessons learnt.
 

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D_W

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I'll have to get back to you on that. This discussion puts me in a pensive mood. And if that later changes to dismissive, does that mean that we change from pensive to expensive?
 

thetyreman

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Finished my Japanese style Sawhorses today,

it's all draw bore tenons and I had to make an Koshi-ire mechigai-zuki ari tsugi (half-lapped, half blind tenoned dovetail joint for the braces, because I didn't have pieces long enough, most of the wood is upcycled and re-used from my original sawhorses where the joints were beggining to weaken and fail, it was a fun build and will definitely outlast me.

I am not sure whether to burn it shou sugi ban style or just leave it as is, let me know what you think?
 

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Cabinetman

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I've made myself a bench! And I can confirm doing so without one is a challange...

Southern yellow pine for most of it, oak dowel and wedges, nothern poplar vice block (I grabbed the first suitable size wood I had at hand). Bench can be knocked down into smaller parts that would fit in a car. Later on, I will make the piece for tools that will fit in the top gap, and I have some orders on the way to drill holes for dogs and holdfasts.

Bench will remain untreated, as I don't see this as a beauty furniture, but a functional jig, so I'm going for high friction, low looks.

It's pretty much my first major wood build, and I'm pretty happy with the results! Started my woodworking journey a year ago. Many lessons learnt.
First major bit of work? That’s pretty damn good! Just would say that a toolrack in between might be what you have seen others do but I’m pretty sure you will find it gets in the way all the time, I would suggest that you replace it with a planing stop, much more useful. Ian
 

D_W

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Add one more to the group of 6 - it's funny when you do anything different, you find out how bad some of your ideas are (even if they're subtle). I like the look of the tapering corners on then handles of the first two more than a plain octagonal handle, but unless you snip the ends of the corners at the handle tops off in an ugly way, they really dig into the hand.

Handle three is octagonal, and a little bit blah, but the remaining three will be the same way. All will be ground thinner at the end bevel end later (no rush, all of the finish grinding is done after hardening, and it makes little difference if it's done before or after the handle is installed). All have significantly rounded over "pillow" shaped tops on the handle, even though you can't see it from this angle. even with that, the sharp-ish corners made by the taper are uncomfortable, and you can see the corners clipped off of the top chisel handle in the picture (it looks OK from this angle, but from the top of the handle, it looks like what it is - a last second fix to a poor idea - a cobble job)

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There aren't many handles of this style on bench chisels in the US (i don't know if I've ever seen one in person, but I could probably prove myself wrong pretty quickly by just looking at ebay listings). the sash chisels in another thread here appear to have a style more similar to the bottom (often fat at the bolster end with some excess, but I left the bolsters larger to accommodate) - it's funny how picky you can get about feel of things if you can just make something. the same thing happens with guitar necks. Once you can make a guitar neck, you will suddenly be less hesitant about stripping finish off of other guitars (even expensive ones) and fixing bits that you don't find that fantastic - often those bits are due to lack of labor to finish fairing curves vs. just sand something that comes off of a CNC leaving kind of ganky shoulders).
 
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