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Padster

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What abrasives do you use? I don't use beyond 180g dry, from there on it's w&d. Fifteen grits, not much more than a wipe with each - by the time 12,000 is reached there isn't really that much to gain from buffing polishes. I use pads for all the fine ones (about £9 a set), and find that by the time I stop the lathe and look to see whether I could skip a grade it's quicker just to have done it, necessary or not. A recycled spray (kitchen cleaners etc.) full of water is useful.
I moved away from anything other than the micro mesh pads this time and it has worked much better, like you say I actually don't bother stopping between grades, but just run my fingers over them in between grades.

Padster
 

D_W

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Finished two of the first set of 8 chisels, more firmer in weight. Big bolsters forge welded as someone asked if I could make them chisels that would be used with 18th century style handles (so the bolsters are also kind of big and flat to leave some meat in place where there would otherwise have been a ferrule).

(chisels in the back are just old english parers). There's no huge significance with these chisels except they are the first set of chisels I've made playing with shop heat treatment techniques that will probably match old W&P chisels, and they're still plenty hard and not chippy).

They're made of a steel called 26c3, which is a 1.25% carbon steel that's by spec "almost as clean" as japanese white steel, but the batch that this bar stock came from is 20 times cleaner than the hitachi white steel spec (so the manufacturer's actual spec is almost meaningless - the sulfur trace is 1/30th of their allowed level). In short, it's really clean and the grain structure is very fine as long as you don't do something to increase the grain size (like overheating it and leaving it overheated for a while).

They're freehand bevel ground and then hand finished (glazed) with loose silicon carbide on a wood block. The two black patches are just my initials in one box and "26" in another so that I can remember what they're made of if anyone ever asks.
20210726_101325_copy_1616x980.jpg
 

Markwfish

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Out of interest, are the tangs forge welded to the chisel blade? Of the same material just normalised or are the tangs a different material? I think they look great!👍😊
 

D_W

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The tangs are straight through (all but the slid on bolster is one piece of steel). The bolster is just a piece of mild steel that's stretched on to the tang (at high heat, obviously - the bolster is heated and the tang not, or it would be like hammering spaghetti) and then heated high and forge welded on and then ground and filed to shape. With a good cutting torch, this is actually pretty easy. However, cutting torches seem to like cutting and brazing, but sitting in a high heat environment to supplement heat in a forge - they don't like that so much. Coal forge isn't going to happen with my spouse, but it's technically not legal where I live, anyway (we're not supposed to burn anything but clean wood).

The higher carbon steel is, the lower temperature it forge welds, but I have some concern over time that if the bolster isn't a bit pliable/stretchy that it may split. I can tolerate some of them moving a little and getting stuck further down the tang, but hope to never get anything back with a broken one!

(bevels a bit funny on the next two because they're not fully established yet. You can see that the bolster has been filed down to the tang better on this picture, but what looks like it may be a gap is actually just the result of safe cornering a file (like adding a safe edge and then removing the corner, too, as that will just cut into the tang and leave grooves). the bigger the bolster ,the flatter it is and my safe corners are a bit too big and leave a little scuzz at the transition there that I'll have to clean up.

20210726_183342_copy_1148x928.jpg
 

TRITON

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Have you tried or thought about sockets on the chisels. They are supposedly stronger.

I will add though I have a set of Lie Nielsen ones and do find the sockets to be a bit of a pain, in that they have a habit of having the handle easily loosen and fall on the floor. Can't think of how many times I've had to bend down and pick the darn things up :LOL: ,but I do see they're a better system and allow handles to be more easily changed and you can swap from short to longer handles for more control
 

D_W

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No, not a fan of sockets. They make chisels unnecessarily heavy in the center, and you can get the same strength (probably better) just starting with heavier stock and making a heavy tang.

I started with socket chisels, and made some long handles, etc, but I think there's a good reason you don't see push chisels made with long handles and short blades (vs. the English type in the picture above). Ultimately, I never used the long handles, and then sold all of the socket chisels. Just a preference.

No harm in light contact cement in your handle tenons to keep the chisels on the handles. The type of wood that LN uses is smooth and doesn't compress much, too, and there's no internal roughness like there is in a lot of older handles.

maybe you just need to put some salt water in them and get them to rust!
 

Hallelujahal

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Bench on a bench!

I’m a bit embarrassed to post this but would appreciate any further suggestions.

I have the woodworking skill set of a schoolboy at best and have recently started trying to make things in wood 🤪

So I want to make a workbench, and knowing the limit of my abilities I decided today to make up a small sized model of the sort of bench that I’d like. Using a few roofing battens I’ve made the bench pictured. I wanted to keep it simple, but able to allow me to plane and generally use hand tools to make some toys etc for the grandkids.
 

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Nigel Taylor

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enamel signs hot out of the kiln

enamel signs.jpg


I'm using WG Ball base coat for steel
 

WoodchipWilbur

If you've not failed you're not trying hard enough
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Bench on a bench!

I’m a bit embarrassed to post this but would appreciate any further suggestions.

I have the woodworking skill set of a schoolboy at best and have recently started trying to make things in wood 🤪

So I want to make a workbench, and knowing the limit of my abilities I decided today to make up a small sized model of the sort of bench that I’d like. Using a few roofing battens I’ve made the bench pictured. I wanted to keep it simple, but able to allow me to plane and generally use hand tools to make some toys etc for the grandkids.
My Dad (rest his soul) had a single word for work benches. Triangulation. However good your joinery skills (and especially if they aren't!) , the joints on a bench will work and move a bit - and lo! You have a wobbly bench. (Hands up those on here who like working on a wobbly bench...) He would always add trianulation pieces to the back and sides to stop that.

I don't think I have ever used triangulation pieces on any of my workbenches - but I have always screwed a piece of sheet material which does the same thing.

<Old man's ramble>

Even the little 3' long "traditional" joiners' bench I made for when I was doing exhibitions had the same - acted as a sort of modesty panel and was also excellent display space. On those little stands that cost an arm and a leg, you need to use whatever space you can! - but I digress... That 3' bench was hugely useful though. On retirement and a move to 10sqm of workspace, it was banished outdoors - where it rotted. Sadly missed though.

</Old man's ramble>
 

Hallelujahal

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My Dad (rest his soul) had a single word for work benches. Triangulation. However good your joinery skills (and especially if they aren't!) , the joints on a bench will work and move a bit - and lo! You have a wobbly bench. (Hands up those on here who like working on a wobbly bench...) He would always add trianulation pieces to the back and sides to stop that.

I don't think I have ever used triangulation pieces on any of my workbenches - but I have always screwed a piece of sheet material which does the same thing.

<Old man's ramble>

Even the little 3' long "traditional" joiners' bench I made for when I was doing exhibitions had the same - acted as a sort of modesty panel and was also excellent display space. On those little stands that cost an arm and a leg, you need to use whatever space you can! - but I digress... That 3' bench was hugely useful though. On retirement and a move to 10sqm of workspace, it was banished outdoors - where it rotted. Sadly missed though.

</Old man's ramble>
Dear Wilbur, yes! Triangulation is what it needs, many thanks for pointing out 👍
Al
 

sometimewoodworker

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My Dad (rest his soul) had a single word for work benches. Triangulation. However good your joinery skills (and especially if they aren't!) , the joints on a bench will work and move a bit - and lo! You have a wobbly bench. (Hands up those on here who like working on a wobbly bench...) He would always add trianulation pieces to the back and sides to stop that.

I don't think I have ever used triangulation pieces on any of my workbenches - but I have always screwed a piece of sheet material which does the same thing.
Humm. That is certainly a good way to get stability, but not the only one.
What I have is a bench that is a knockdown one but on steroids, the 2 end pieces have joints that will never work or move the glue surface is just too big (double M/T that are 10cm x 10cm each so 800sq cm per end) then the long rails are attached with 30cm coach bolts and the top held down with wall plate J bolts. The whole thing is probably over 100kg with storage underneath the top, it’s also on wheels so that reduces the racking forces.
image.jpg
 

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